• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

Global Military Spending - NEWS ONLY

totoro

ACCESS: Secret
Joined
Jan 11, 2011
Messages
395
Reaction score
128

Chinese defense spending for 2021 projected at 1350 trillion Yuan. Which would constitute a 6.8% rise up from previous year. If using current dollar to yuan rate, one gets 208 billion dollars.

Trying to adjust that figure for differences in costs is harder. One could go about it two ways. Using just the purchasing power parity ratio, as defined by IMF. Or using anecdotal living costs / average wave differences. The latter is certainly less precise but it perhaps is worth mentioning as using that the Chinese budget blooms to a few times its size.

Using PPP, Chinese budget may translate to 312 billion USD, trying for an apples to apples comparison with US budget.
Using average wage difference, Chinese budget may translate to as much as 416 to 520 billion USD.

While the later set of figures may very well be exaggerated, it's plausible the actual difference is at least at the level of the PPP difference,
meaning the actual Chinese defense spending is comparable to over 300 billion dollars.
 
Last edited:

In_A_Dream

ACCESS: Secret
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
253
Reaction score
111
Given that China's military spending is more shrouded within their commercial (state-owned) sectors than the US, I believe the best way to pragmatically understand their budget & intentions is to measure pure output. We know their defense manufacturing infrastructure is increasing every single year, their production capacity is increasing every single year, they are working hard to modernize their military across the board, taking huge strides to do so. They are clearly developing their military to be an expeditionary force with the emphasis on aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, & aerial refueling.

The actual number value is inconsequential.
 

totoro

ACCESS: Secret
Joined
Jan 11, 2011
Messages
395
Reaction score
128
Given that China's military spending is more shrouded within their commercial (state-owned) sectors than the US, I believe the best way to pragmatically understand their budget & intentions is to measure pure output. We know their defense manufacturing infrastructure is increasing every single year, their production capacity is increasing every single year, they are working hard to modernize their military across the board, taking huge strides to do so. They are clearly developing their military to be an expeditionary force with the emphasis on aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, & aerial refueling.

The actual number value is inconsequential.

Problem is, trying to measure and count just the theoretically countable stuff (number of vehicles, planes, ships, missiles etc) they put out is extremely hard to do.

For example, one can sort of do it for the big items. Ships for sure. And even combat aircraft to a fairly precise degree. But when one gets to less sexy systems which aren't really photographed often - like various special mission planes- then it already becomes much harder to track what China has procured.

Imagine trying to make up a list of what China got in the last 5 years.
Special mission planes?
Helicopters of various kinds?
Ballistic/Cruise missiles?
Tanks?
IFVs and APCs?
Artillery pieces?
SAMs?

all those items are so hard to track that the estimate value could easily be X or 3X for each of those items on the list.

Without those figures, it's not really any more precise than just using the defense spending figure over the last 5 years and going with that.
 

In_A_Dream

ACCESS: Secret
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
253
Reaction score
111
Problem is, trying to measure and count just the theoretically countable stuff (number of vehicles, planes, ships, missiles etc) they put out is extremely hard to do.

For example, one can sort of do it for the big items. Ships for sure. And even combat aircraft to a fairly precise degree. But when one gets to less sexy systems which aren't really photographed often - like various special mission planes- then it already becomes much harder to track what China has procured.

Imagine trying to make up a list of what China got in the last 5 years.
Special mission planes?
Helicopters of various kinds?
Ballistic/Cruise missiles?
Tanks?
IFVs and APCs?
Artillery pieces?
SAMs?

all those items are so hard to track that the estimate value could easily be X or 3X for each of those items on the list.

Without those figures, it's not really any more precise than just using the defense spending figure over the last 5 years and going with that.
Welcome to the wonderful world of Covert ISR & Espionage.
 

bobbymike

ACCESS: USAP
Joined
Apr 21, 2009
Messages
10,726
Reaction score
1,801

TomcatViP

Hellcat
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
3,363
Reaction score
2,148
International deliveries of arms were flat in the period 2016-2020, ending more than a decade of increases, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) said in a report on Monday.


The United States, France and Germany - three of the world's biggest exporters - increased deliveries, but falls in exports from Russian and China offset the rise, SIPRI said.


It was the first time since 2001–2005 that the volume of deliveries of major arms between countries - an indicator of demand - did not increase from the previous five year period, SIPRI said.
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
14,044
Reaction score
3,854
On a somewhat amusing note:

The United States has been pushing its European allies to invest more in defense. How might it facilitate that? Help establish a new financial institution, suggested a new think tank report.

NATO’s renewed focus on modernization is being spurred by Russia’s resurgence. However, the alliance has not fully leveraged one of its potentially most powerful assets — the collective financial clout of its members, said a study by the Center for American Progress, “NATO’s Financing Gap: Why NATO Should Create Its Own Bank.”
 

bobbymike

ACCESS: USAP
Joined
Apr 21, 2009
Messages
10,726
Reaction score
1,801

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
14,044
Reaction score
3,854
 

Similar threads

Top