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Focke Wulf Fw 190/Ta 152 Projects & Variants

newsdeskdan

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Was that a Drawing number or serial number (670007) ?.
it's the Werk Nummer of this Fw 190 (top of the page)View attachment 644504

I don't think Werk-Nr. 670007 was the sole Fw 190 tested with Doppelreiter tanks. The initial design and testing does seem to have been carried out by FGZ and E-Stelle Travemuende with JGr. 10 but it would appear that Focke-Wulf carried out its own tests on the tanks in January 1945 with Fw 190 A-8 Werk-Nr. 380394.
 

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fightingirish

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Just for your information,
as an answer by the editor to a customer letter, published on page 97 in the latest issue of the German magazine "FliegerRevue X Magazine Nr 87 2020", it is mentioned, that a British aviation historian (better known to us as Dan Sharp) recently discovered a report from 1944-02-01, that Focke Wulf planned to marry a Ta 152 airframe with a British Napier Sabre engine.
That engineering drawing, which is originally published in Dan's bookazine "Luftwaffe: Secret Projects of the Third Reich profiles", is also shown.
But the source of that drawing published on page 97 in FliegerRevue X #87 is from a collection of Mr. Uwe. W. Jack.
 

newsdeskdan

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Just for your information,
as an answer by the editor to a customer letter, published on page 97 in the latest issue of the German magazine "FliegerRevue X Magazine Nr 87 2020", it is mentioned, that a British aviation historian (better known to us as Dan Sharp) recently discovered a report from 1944-02-01, that Focke Wulf planned to marry a Ta 152 airframe with a British Napier Sabre engine.
That engineering drawing, which is originally published in Dan's bookazine "Luftwaffe: Secret Projects of the Third Reich profiles", is also shown.
But the source of that drawing published on page 97 in FliegerRevue X #87 is from a collection of Mr. Uwe. W. Jack.

Thanks for alerting me to this fightingirish. It is very curious. I went and bought a copy of FliegerRevue X #87 from the magazine website. The drawing is indeed credited to Uwe W. Jack's collection.
I discovered the report in September 2017 but didn't publish anything on it at that time. Luftwaffe: Secret Projects of the Third Reich, detailing the Focke-Wulf report and including the drawing in question, came out in August 2019. It did not include a reference for exactly where the original report could be found.
FliegerRevue X acknowledges that I discovered the Focke-Wulf report - it was never mentioned by anyone else, as far as I can tell, during the 73 years between the point at which the report was produced and the point at which I found it. And there have been a lot of people who have written about the Ta 152 in the interim. None of them discovered the report, or if they did they kept it to themselves, which seems unlikely to me.
The first moment that FliegerRevue could have reasonably become aware of my discovery was August 2019. But they couldn't reasonably have known where I found the report. I didn't tell anyone.
Even if you knew which of the 2000 or so T-2 microfilm reels it was on, it would have been difficult to get hold of a copy before NASM stopped processing microfilm orders in early 2020.
The drawing printed by FliegerRevue is clearly from the same source as 'my' drawing (see the unedited raw image below, which appears exactly as it was scanned). Note the lighter areas above the engine and just in front of the cockpit. These are also present in the FliegerRevue drawing. Different settings on a different scanner might have eliminated these 'white spots'.
When the drawing was originally photographed for microfilming, it was placed on a black background to make the details stand out better. This resulted in a black area visible above the uppermost edge of the drawing. I edited most of this black border out for inclusion in the bookazine, so no one would have been aware of it if they hadn't seen the original. The FliegerRevue drawing has a white area extending above the drawing. The lower and right hand edges of the FliegerRevue drawing have been edited to chop off the line which runs through the centre of the aircraft to the right and also to remove the upper part of the cockpit canopy from the design below, which ought to intrude into the view they show, but doesn't.
It would be interesting to know whether Mr Jack can cite the source of the drawing in his collection. Surely, if he had the report before me then he ought to be acknowledged as its discoverer. Acquiring the report after I published it, without knowing the file reference, would have been... very difficult.

Ta 152.jpg
 
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