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Flying Wing projects

Maveric

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Hi all,

found this Flying wing project in Mittler FliegerKalender 1998.
Project by Dr.-Ing. Richard Vogt / Hamburger Flugzeugbau GmbH, ca.1936.
But I´ve no type-number.

Servus Maveric
 

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Maveric

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...the next project by Dipl.-Ing. Franz Villinger / Junkers ( same source ).
 

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Maveric

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...don´t forget a 3view drawing of the Villinger design, but also without Type number.

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Maveric

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...and the project by Donovan R. Berlin from the Curtiss-Wright Company in Delaware. ( same source )

Servus Maveric
 

Maveric

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Sorry, sorry, sorry!!!!!!!
 

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Maveric

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Hi all,

the Villinger project from 1938 and the Berlin project from 1940.
The Berlin design / patent a forunner for Curtiss P.244 and Curtiss P.249?

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Apophenia

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The Vogt project appears to be powered by twin Jumo 205 diesels.

But what might the (V12?) engine of the Villinger design be?
 

hesham

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A delayed question for Maveric,

what was the year of Junkers model and what was the meaning
of SF 95 ?.
 

Jemiba

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As there's the sign for copyright, "SF" probably are the initial
of the artist, who made the 3-view
 

Grey Havoc

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Came across the following at: http://fly.historicwings.com/2013/03/the-dunne-flying-wing/
 

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steelpillow

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There is something of a mix-up here over what should be classified as a "flying wing" and what is merely a "tailless" aeroplane.

Definitions of a "flying wing" go back at least to Hugo Junkers in 1910 - see http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1929/1929%20-%200258.html . Junkers' idea is contrasted to types like the Dunne (seen above) which were described as "tailless" but were not flying wings because they had fuselage nacelles. Opinions seem to differ as to whether a "flying wing" can have a tail - some early Northrop types sometimes described as such had a tail on twin booms - but one thing is certain, if the craft has an identifiable fuselage than it is not a flying wing.

As such, none of the types illustrated in this topic to date is a flying wing. They are more correctly classified as tailless aircraft and, by rights, this topic should be renamed.
 

Jemiba

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steelpillow said:
As such, none of the types illustrated in this topic to date is a flying wing. They are more correctly classified as tailless aircraft and, by rights, this topic should be renamed.

Correct, I think, and principally the only tailless designs are those Dunn types ! But those confusions
are frequent even in principally reliable sources. For example, the Northrop YB-35 was a true flying wing,
but already the YB-49 had vertical flying surfaces, so it wasn't.
Any suggestion for an appropriate title ?
 

steelpillow

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Generally, the term "tailless" refers to any horizontal auxiliary surface. A design such as the Avro Vulcan is regarded as "tailless" despite its fin but, because it still just has an identifiable fuselage, is not a flying wing. Even the Dunne tailless biplanes had stabilising fins or endplates between the wing tips (but, interestingly, no rudders).

Tailless aircraft projects would accurately describe the progress of this topic to date. [Update] No it wouldn't. See my later comment.
 

lark

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Flying Wings & Tailless aicraft projects perhaps..?
 

Jemiba

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Thought about something like this, too, but those designs
by Vogt, Villinger and Berlin to my opinion are more or less
twin boom aircraft with the booms widely separated. Is there
a special term for ?
 
J

joncarrfarrelly

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Tailless Aircraft and Sort-of Flying Wings with Vestigial Tail Surfaces

;D
 

steelpillow

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Jemiba said:
Thought about something like this, too, but those designs
by Vogt, Villinger and Berlin to my opinion are more or less
twin boom aircraft with the booms widely separated. Is there
a special term for ?

Generally speaking, twin-boom types have a tail and some sort of central nacelle that qualifies as a fuselage. As such they are simply classes as "twin-boom" types. There is no standard term for designs which have the booms far outboard.

There is a sense in which the Dunne biplane does have a tail, albeit just a pair of fins.

I was obviously wrong when I said that everything here was tailless.

How about calling this topic Wingtip tail projects?
 

Stargazer2006

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"Wintip tail" just doesn't make any sense to me. If we keep in mind the analogy between bird and aircraft, the two have to remain distinct units. Adding fins to the wing tips doesn't mean you add tails! Also remember that the early aviators called the Dunne designs "tailless" for a reason...
 

shedofdread

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The Dunne aeroplane is tailless because it has no horizontal stabiliser. The first four designs displayed in the thread are in no way tailless or flying wings - they are merely of unconventional layout but they do have fins AND tailplanes. A true 'flying wing' would be something like a Horten design (having no fuselage, vertical fins or horizontal stabiliser). I hope that helps.
 

lark

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The planes show in Maveric's inital post are described
as "Nurflügel mit Leitwerk" in the title of his article.

Could be translated as -all wing with rudder(s)

p.s. checked a some books and a lot of magazine articles about the theme.
Most have as main title "Flying Wings" with the subtitle "and talless aircraft"..
 

XP67_Moonbat

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I'm really digging those designs posted by Maverick and Justo at the begining of the thread. I never even knew those were there all this time! Nice!
 

Firebee

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The Dunne design in an earlier post was further developed in to a floatplane. It even made the cover of a book:

Winged Wonders: The Story of the Flying Wings
by E.T. Wooldridge
My copy is a paperback from 1984
ISBN: 0874749670
 

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XP67_Moonbat

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OMG! I miss that book! As a kid, I used to check mine outta the library so often, it was practically my copy.
 

steelpillow

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How deeply does Wooldridge go into the Dunne aircraft built in Britain and France, and the history of their development?
 

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