Europa Clipper

Flyaway

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TomcatViP

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So this...
the torsional loads were about three times higher than comparable rockets."
is factually incorrect.
Let's hope that this would not be the basis of any decision.
 
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Flyaway

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So this...
the torsional loads were about three times higher than comparable rockets."
is factually incorrect.
Let's hope that this would be not the basis of any decision.
I suppose it will be interesting to see the report though how a politician and his staff will be able to interpret what is no doubt a highly technical analysis requiring specialist knowledge to understand.
 

Flyaway

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You really should take a look at the letter that Rep. Babin sent to Steve Jurczyk on this whole Europa Clipper/SLS launch decision thing. I gotta tell you, I have neen reading letters between Congress and NASA for 25 years. Some have been rather pointed, confrontational, and snarky. And I have certainly written more than my fair share of snarky gotcha PAO and FOIA requests to NASA designed to make sure that no stone is left unturned. But I have to say that in all the time I have been editing NASAWatch I have never seen a letter from Congress to NASA requesting formation wherein the quasi-legalistic definitions of what constitutes the requested information - and how it is to be identified, sourced, and transmitted to Congress - that uses three times the words of what information is actually being asked for.

Rep. Babin is in the minority, so there is only so much mischief that he can do with whatever NASA provides. But he clearly has some legal eagle on his staff who is trying use their law degree to catch NASA in the act of doing something bad or not being responsive - however trivial the infraction may be.

Letter on the link below.

 

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I take it that there will be no surface lander or submersible on Europa Clipper?
Correct.

I hope that NASA does a follow on mission that carries either a submersible or a lander, only then will we know for sure that Europa has some form of life in it’s ocean.
 

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I take it that there will be no surface lander or submersible on Europa Clipper?
Correct.

I hope that NASA does a follow on mission that carries either a submersible or a lander, only then will we know for sure that Europa has some form of life in it’s ocean.
There was proposals for a Europa lander but last I read it was very much on the back burner due to cost and complexity.
 

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Flyaway

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The launch of Europa Clipper has been awarded to Space X and the Falcon Heavy in an announcement that absolutely everyone expected once it was freed from SLS.

 

Flyaway

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View: https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1418666356619218946


This is an absolute bargain. According to the White House OMB, launching on the Space Launch System rocket would have cost "over $2 billion." So SpaceX just saved the federal government $2 billion.

View: https://twitter.com/brickmack/status/1418673761977442307


OIG says the marginal cost of a block 1 SLS is 886 million. That doesn't include the billion a year in operating costs for the facilities it uses, or ongoing development work
 

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The mission cadence is reported as follows:

Launch in October 2024
Mars in February 2025
Earth in December 2026
Arriving at Europa in April 2030.
 

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Astronomers Get Ready to Probe Europa’s Hidden Ocean for Life

Planetary scientists are discovering more about Jupiter’s fourth-largest moon, one of Earth’s nearest ocean worlds—places like Saturn’s moons Titan and Enceladus that have bodies of salty water and other liquids that could be amenable to the emergence of life. They’re presenting new findings this week about Europa’s cracked surface, hidden ocean, and geological activity at the biggest annual planetary conference in the United States, organized by the American Astronomical Society, held virtually for the second year in a row. The research serves as a prelude to tantalizing opportunities for new observations by upcoming missions being dispatched by NASA and the European Space Agency.

“Europa is fantastic. Of anywhere in the solar system, outside the Earth, it has the greatest potential, I think, for maintaining a habitable environment that could support microbial life,” says Michael Bland, a US Geological Survey space scientist in Flagstaff, Arizona. After modeling the moon’s dynamic, rocky interior, Bland believes the conditions on its deep seafloor could be amenable to life, according to new work that he and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Catherine Elder presented at the conference on Monday.

After that, Bland, Babcock, and their colleagues look forward to NASA’s Europa Clipper, a mission years in the making that’s planned for launch in 2024. “The Europa Clipper will assess Europa’s habitability and how we might be able to use these investigations for other ocean worlds, thinking about the potential for life there as well,” says Kathleen Craft, a planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Baltimore, who will be presenting at the conference on Thursday.

The car-sized orbiter, with 100-foot solar panels unfurled on each side, will use radar, radio signals, and gravity science to study the structure of the moon, including measuring the thickness of the ice shell and the depth of the underground ocean. It will also try to snag samples from its plumes, which could include droplets from the ocean itself that might reveal information about how conducive to life it really is, Craft says. A baguette-sized instrument will ingest gas and vapor, analyze and classify the contents, and then beam the crucial data back to scientists at home.

Its mission also includes conducting aerial surveillance for a potential lander mission to Europa, which could scoop up material on the surface, or drill down for it, looking for that coveted evidence of extraterrestrial lifeforms.

 

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Astronomers Get Ready to Probe Europa’s Hidden Ocean for Life

Planetary scientists are discovering more about Jupiter’s fourth-largest moon, one of Earth’s nearest ocean worlds—places like Saturn’s moons Titan and Enceladus that have bodies of salty water and other liquids that could be amenable to the emergence of life. They’re presenting new findings this week about Europa’s cracked surface, hidden ocean, and geological activity at the biggest annual planetary conference in the United States, organized by the American Astronomical Society, held virtually for the second year in a row. The research serves as a prelude to tantalizing opportunities for new observations by upcoming missions being dispatched by NASA and the European Space Agency.

“Europa is fantastic. Of anywhere in the solar system, outside the Earth, it has the greatest potential, I think, for maintaining a habitable environment that could support microbial life,” says Michael Bland, a US Geological Survey space scientist in Flagstaff, Arizona. After modeling the moon’s dynamic, rocky interior, Bland believes the conditions on its deep seafloor could be amenable to life, according to new work that he and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Catherine Elder presented at the conference on Monday.

After that, Bland, Babcock, and their colleagues look forward to NASA’s Europa Clipper, a mission years in the making that’s planned for launch in 2024. “The Europa Clipper will assess Europa’s habitability and how we might be able to use these investigations for other ocean worlds, thinking about the potential for life there as well,” says Kathleen Craft, a planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Baltimore, who will be presenting at the conference on Thursday.

The car-sized orbiter, with 100-foot solar panels unfurled on each side, will use radar, radio signals, and gravity science to study the structure of the moon, including measuring the thickness of the ice shell and the depth of the underground ocean. It will also try to snag samples from its plumes, which could include droplets from the ocean itself that might reveal information about how conducive to life it really is, Craft says. A baguette-sized instrument will ingest gas and vapor, analyze and classify the contents, and then beam the crucial data back to scientists at home.

Its mission also includes conducting aerial surveillance for a potential lander mission to Europa, which could scoop up material on the surface, or drill down for it, looking for that coveted evidence of extraterrestrial lifeforms.


I cannot wait for Europa Clipper to launch, I have been wanting a dedicated Europa mission ever since the Voyager
missions and of course the Galileo probe. There is so much that we do not know about Europa and the potential for life bellow the frozen surface.
 

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That may be among the least surprising discoveries in Jovian exploration history but hopefully it will lend more weight to the case for a Europa lander mission. The monolith can go suck a Trojan.
 

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That may be among the least surprising discoveries in Jovian exploration history but hopefully it will lend more weight to the case for a Europa lander mission. The monolith can go suck a Trojan.

Hopefully NASA will get the necessary funding for a future Europa lander mission after the Europa Clipper has finished its mission, so I would think that a lander will be ready for launch sometime next decade.
 

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