Dark Moon Rising: Archibald space TL

Justo Miranda

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Some fun with alt pop culture ITTL

Space station Zvezda is a techno-thriller written by Harry G. Stine under the nom de plume Lee Correy and published in 1985. The title is a reference to both novel and movie Ice Station Zebra of the 60's.


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Ilya Patchikov and Ivan Popov could have been the first Soviet citizens to the Moon in August 1974. They have trained very hard – for weeks they worked eighteen hours a day. But at the last moment and to their great dismay the Politburo decided the mission will be entirely automated; and by a fitting irony for the first time the Soviet Moon machines perfectly worked, including the very troublesome N-1 rocket. And then the Soviet lunar program is cancelled as too late and too backwards when compared to Apollo.

From 1973 onwards the two frustrated cosmonauts get involved with the Apollo – Soyuz test program, visiting the United States and befriending American astronauts Pruett and Johnson. They learn about the Apollo – Soyuz radio link; they visit mockups of the future American space station.

Within two years after the Apollo–Soyuz linking Popov and Patchikov hear of Sablin and Belenko mutiny and defection, both due to the Brezhnev era stagnation and corruption; and are troubled by it. Growing more and more disillusioned by the late Brezhnev era ramping corruption Popov and Patchikov patiently elaborate a plot. At some point in the early 80's they learn that Pruett and Johnson are to man Liberty, so they decide to go into action.

They are send to space station Zvezda, an advanced orbital facility with artificial gravity provided by spinning around Salyut-like modules. After some days they pretext a health emergency, and an hurried undocking; to be followed by a direct reentry. They then told ground controlled that the hurried undocking has consumed most of the Soyuz propellant, leaving them stranded in orbit. For a period they also shut contact with the ground. Meanwhile they use their Soyuz meagre propellant supply to get close from the American space station. But they can't dock – the rings are not compatible – so a sortie is needed. And of course the American crew may refuse to accept them onboard.

The Soviet crew then elaborates an outrageous scheme to twist arm of the American crew.

The Soyuz first gets as close as possible from the Liberty airlock. Then the crew don their space suits before opening the Soyuz docking ring, depressurizing their spaceship. Popov crawls through the docking tunnel into space, and extends his arms outside the Soyuz, with the aim of gripping the American space station external airlock hatch with his gloved hands. Patchikov has to carefully manoeuver the Soyuz in order not to crush his crewmate. The daring manoeuver ultimately succeeds. Standing halfway through the Soyuz docking ring Popov then secures his position with a rope, while Patchikov uses him like an human ladder until he grasp, too, the Liberty airlock external hatch. But the Soyuz is still very close from the two cosmonauts, and there is a real threat they might be crushed by a collision between their spaceship and Liberty. Popov and Patchikov then try a radical approach: they forcefully and repeatedly kick the Soyuz with their feet so that it moves away from them, an exhausting ordeal that ultimately works. The American crew watch the scene, startled, and report to the ground, expressedly asking to welcome the cosmonauts onboard.

With the Soviet suit providing only seven hours of life-support, the Americans have to take a difficult decision very fast. Under orders from the U.S government NASA order the Soviet cosmonauts to move back to their Soyuz and reenter Earth atmosphere. The space station crew will do his best to help the Soyuz desorbit, either with the robotic arm or using one of their Agena space tug.

But the Soviet crew refuse to comply. Ultimately Pruett and Johnson desobey orders and get the Soviets onboard, creating a dangerous situation. Once aboard space station Liberty Popov and Patchikov ask for political asylum in the United States.

The situation is made even more explosive considering the events happens late 1983, in an era of tension never seen since the Cuban crisis of 1962. Tension peaks as all of sudden Houston warns the Liberty crew that the Soviet have launched an I.S satellite killer near the American space station; they threaten to cripple the American space station. This prompt president Reagan to call Andropov on the red phone, with a heated exchange happening between the two men. Ultimately the Soviets desorbit the killer satellite as a gesture of goodwill.

Another threat is the abandonned Soyuz that dangerously drift near Liberty; the American crew decides to to use the robotic arm to pick up the Soviet spaceship and keep it at a safe distance from Liberty. A major issue is that the Soyuz lacks a grapple fixture compatible with the arm end. Instead the Liberty crew tries to clamp the arm end on a Soyuz antenna but the manoeuver goes awfully wrong. The antenna bends and breaks, sending the Soyuz tumbling into a wild spin, hitting and breaking the robotic arm. The Soyuz then strike Liberty, causing a small fire and damaging a solar array. Ultimately the Liberty crew decide to fire an Agena space tug to move the space station away from the battered Soyuz, and the manoeuver successfully clear the american space station from any danger.

Meanwhile Andropov is bargaining with Reagan. He will let the crew goes to the United States if Reagan roll back his Strategic Defense Initiative. Reagan, striken by Soviet panick vis a vis the Able Archer excercice and “The day after” gloomy movie decides to make concessions, perhaps through a meeting with Andropov.

In the end Reagan asks Congress to enact a bill granting asylum to the Soviet crew. A trust fund will be set up for them, granting them a very comfortable living. The meeting between Reagan and a terminally ill Andropov never happens, but it paves the way to Gorbatchev perestroika and the end of Cold War – earlier than in our universe, in 1987.


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According to Stine himself “Well, Valery Sabline mutiny aboard a Soviet frigate in 1975 inspired Tom Clancy to write Hunt for Red October a decade later. Meanwhile the year after, in 1976 Viktor Belenko flew his MiG-25 to Japan and this inspired another techno-thriller – Craig Thomas Firefox, published in 1982. I felt another novel could be written on a similar subject, except this time in space.

In 1980 John Barron wrote a book about the Belenko case. According to Belenko himself when asked how long did he planned his escape, and what did it involve ?

“In terms of the evolution of my thoughts and making the conclusion to escape I do not have a precise time. I did make that decision based on my dissatisfaction with that country. I tried to do my best. I was one of their best fighter pilots. When I was young I was possessed by socialist and communist ideas which are very appealing because they promise full employment, free education, free medical care, good retirement, free child care, and so on. But later I discovered that those ideas were serving only a very small number of Communist nomenclatura, and the rest of the people were basically slaves. I made my conclusion that I could not change that system. The system is so big that there's no way I could change it or exist inside of it as a normal human being. For me, it was the best thing to divorce myself from that system. I was a fighter pilot, but that had nothing to do with my decision to escape. If I had not been a fighter pilot, I would still have found way to escape from that concentration camp. Even today, with all the slogans and all the freedoms, that country is still a closed society.

It took me a while to build the critical mass in my mind to make that decision, but the final decision I made a month before my escape, and when I made that decision I felt so good about myself! I felt like I was walking on the top of clouds. I felt free. But for me to achieve my objective I must have good weather in Japan and 100% fuel, and it took one month to have those two components in place. During that month I performed my duties so well that my commanding officers were ready to promote me. But on September 6, 1976 all components were in place. By the way, I did not steal the airplane. I had clearances. I just changed my flight plans slightly in the air.” Belenko concluded.

Stine later said “Barron's book about Belenko was fascinating. Then it occurred to me that, since 1978 NASA Liberty faced the OPSEK-Mir Soviet space station. The two were in very similar orbits, 51.6 degree inclined over the equator and 200 miles high. People were saying the situation was very similar to Berlin (before the wall), but in space. This stroke me – could a Soviet cosmonaut pull a Sablin or a Belenko, that is, flying his Soyuz to the American space station and asking for political asylum ? It was an exciting pitch for a novel or a movie script, and I decided to dug the concept further. It reminded me, somewhat, of Martin Caidin Marooned. When I started writing the novel late 1983 I could hardly imagine that the legendary Clint Eastwood would adapt it into a movie at the turn of the century, in 1999.

After the end of Cold War we learned, startled, that Soyuz contingency landing zones included the American prairies. There were landing points in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, North Dakota, Texas and, Oklahoma. The Texas (contingency !) landing point for Soyuz-33 at 33N, 97.6 W was actually quite close to Fort Worth.

Imagine the situation: at the height of Cold War, a Soyuz lands on goddam Texas, kingdom of anti-communism feelings in America. It would make for one hell of a culture clash !​
Roswell Mk.II ???
 

Michel Van

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Archibald

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Not only TOWN HALL and B-58: the CIA did the same, same time (spring 1962) with their A-12 OXCART. Both studies with Lockheed Polaris missiles but no Lockheed Agena. I just had a smartass engineer getting that idea and starting a frenzy.
Somewhat ironically, I do know proposals were made OTL of XB-70 + solid fuel booster + Agena. According to my calculations it could have lifted 2000 to 3000 pounds to orbit.
 
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Archibald

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A small nugget I wrote this morning - and it was rather funny.

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The Stickney society was co-founded in 1978 by Brian O'Leary and Fred S. Singer with Richard Hoagland enthusiast backing.

In the spring of 1977 O'Leary and Singer were at JPL for Viking 1 flyby of Phobos and found they shared a deep fascination for the small martian moon. Notably at the next logical step, delta-v wise, after the Moon. "Well in fact its surface is easier to go, energy-wise, than the Moon." O'Leary noted.

Stickney is the largest crater on Phobos, which is a satellite of Mars. It is 9 km in diameter, taking up a substantial proportion of the moon's surface. The crater is named after Chloe Angeline Stickney Hall, wife of Phobos's discoverer, Asaph Hall. In 1878 Hall wrote that he "might have abandoned the search [for Martian satellites] had it not been for the encouragement of [his] wife." The crater was named in 1973, based on Mariner 9 images, by an IAU nomenclature committee chaired by Carl Sagan, an accointance of O'Leary now teaching at Cornell after a fall-out with Gerard O'Neill.

In 1977 O'Leary mind was blown by Viking 1 repeated flybys of Phobos, notably the huge crater called Stickney. He drew from his mentor Gerard O'Neill work on lunar caves to propose an underground Phobos base as the next logical step, delta-v wise. He created a space enthusiast group to promote the idea.

Singer joined because of a Soviet friend of Carl Sagan - Iosif Samuilovich Shklovsky - who was pretending that Phobos was hollow and artificial. He had thoroughly rebutted that theory back in 1962 and wanted to use the debate as a way of embarrassing Sagan, his polar opposite and nemesis, including in the medias.

Hoagland joined in the wake of a very successfull public campaign to name Space Station Liberty first module Enterprise, rather than Constitution. Hoagland was also intrigued, if not fascinated, by Shklovsky theory of Phobos being hollow and potentially artificial. He was later expelled by Singer and O'Leary when he crossed into conspiracy and fringe science territory.

The two co-founders reputations in the 80's ended nonetheless tainted by their association with Hoagland. "That's true, and we suffered a lot from it." O'Leary later said. "Particularly for Singer, who ended rather bitting about the whole thing. In my case, watching that Hoagland guy being so nut and accordingly, so humiliated, was kind of a welcome warning in a troubled period of my life. Don't go fringe science and conspiracy nut; or pay for the consequences on your reputation." And indeed in the early 80's Singer reputation among his peers – people like Bill Nierenberg and Fred Seitz – took a serious blow.

Led by a galvanized Hoagland, the society early on rapidly grew in size; its most notable feat in 1979 was a phone and letters public campaign to pressure NASA in landing one of the Viking orbiters on Phobos. Because of that Moon diminutive size, its gravity pull is so low that a landing is more akin to a docking. Singer argued that since Viking 1 was already in a trajectory that met Phobos yet it was running out of attitude control gas, landing it on Phobos may stabilize it and allow the mission to last a little longer. He was heard and in the summer of 1980 the landing was a major success – only for Hoagland to go out of control soon thereafter, and being fired in 1981. The Society fortunes took a nose dive afterwards, although O'LEary fought for it and it still exists.​
 

Archibald

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Another day, another tidbit.

Reagan, SDI, Star wars and Edward "Strangelove" Teller takes a vastly different shape than OTL.

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February 1981

Owen Gordon was horrified.

General Shoemaker, now his implacable foe, had done it. Sensing that the election of Reagan would be a welcome change, he got authorized to brief Maxwell Hunter about the incredible breakthrough that was pulsed-NTR.

Many years before in the late 60's Gordon had welcomed Hunter at Lockheed and presented him to Shoemaker: how stupid he had been ! These two of course had not forgotten each other. In turn, Hunter carefully leaked it to the varied factions trying to get Reagan involved in a new, spaceborne ABM defense.

Ted Taylor (and Freeman Dyson to a lesser level) had expressly avoided to tell Teller about pulsed-NTR; all too aware he would be as excited as a kid being handled matches and firecrackers. Back then (between 1964 and 1972) they had bet instead on Bussard and ASPEN, but Teller simply brushed them aside. The lure of giganormous payload to orbit was too strong, and Teller finally got wind of the revolutionary engine, too. Hunter for his part dusted off his old RITA nuclear single-stage-to-orbit vehicle, and did the maths, and his mind was blown.

In a nod to Intel and their famous microchip, MAxwell Hunter called it "the 8000 rocket" for a simple reason: with 8000 seconds of specific impulse, it could lift 8000 metric tons into orbit. It was a very preliminary calculation, but a rather spectacular one: 9.81*8000*ln(1000+8000)/(10+8000) = 9145 m/s.

This send Teller to the roof.

And High frontier, too.

And then, just like bank robbers flushed in dollars after the break-in of the century, they split. Soon were four factions fighting for its own ABM system. Somewhat remarquably, pulsed-NTR fit all of them like a glove. It was rebranded PUNTER, which stood for PUlsed Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket.

Hunter, Senator Malcolm Wallop and his aide Codevilla wanted, quite simply, to split those 8000 tons into 80 spaceborne chemical lasers battlestations, a hundred tons each. Once in orbit, they would be manoeuvered by pulsed-NTR Orbital Transfer Vehicles. As a matter of fact, chemical lasers power was in the 1 to 2 MW range; when a TRIGA could briefly pulse to 22 000 MW and PUNTER, 33 000 MW.

And then was General Harold Shoemak, who semingly had found a soul mate in the person of Daniel O. Graham.
Once again, starting from the 8000 metric tons, they wanted to boost 80 000 kinetic interceptors, two-hundreds pound each: that old Random Barrage System canard. Only a SINGLE vehicle could lift the whole enormous system into orbit: it was Tommy Power & Mixson 1961's Orion ABM scheme come true - with a much more practical vehicle.
Alternatively, the interceptors could be made much heavier - 1 metric ton or 10 metric tons - and launched by some dozen pulsed-NTR lifters. This radically solved miniaturization and autonomy issues; no need for "orbital garages". Or the said orbital garages could be rapidly and efficiently manoeuvered in orbit by more pulsed-NTR vehicles: the same Orbital Transfer Vehicles dragging the chemical lasers.

Another faction - linked to the US Army - reasoned that, with such enormous payload to orbit, why not try its chance and lift SPARTAN and SPRINT existing ABM missiles into suborbital flight and fire them at incoming Soviet missiles. They had been deployed on the ground in 1975 only to be retired months after.

And finally come Teller, with his usual minions - Lowell Wood and Roderick Hyde.

He had an even more grandiose vision. He wanted to use pulsed-NTR to power his Excalibur laser.

Teller's Excalibur was a nuclear pumped laser: pumped with the energy of fission fragments. The lasing medium is enclosed in a tube lined with uranium-235 and subjected to high neutron flux in a nuclear reactor core. The fission fragments of the uranium create excited plasma with inverse population of energy levels, which then lases.

When Teller married PUNTER and EXCALIBUR, he got all excited.

It happened that Dyson and Taylor had created PUNTER in the first place to correct NASA NERVA deadly flaw. Which was: it heated hydrogen fuel using those very same fission fragments, because they represented no less than 94% of the reactor energy output. Now, how about the 6% left ? They were neutron kinetic energy. Taylor stroke of genius was to use that to heat the hydrogen, and he had a very good reason. Unlike fission fragments, neutron kinetic energy could heat hydrogen fuel without the huge, irritating constraints of the laws of thermodynamics. And that was paramount, because it solved NERVA materials temperature issue (2700 K !) that in turn impacted head-on specific impulse and kept it well below 1000 seconds; too close from chemical rockets to make a significant gain, considering many others issues that plagued solid-core NTR. Sticking with fission fragments, NASA had tried to solve the materials temperature, laws-of-thermodynamics issue by changing the reactor core shape; all the way from solid-core to gaseous core: GCNR, the mythical but unpractical "nuclear lightbulb". Taylor got a little smarter and shifted the hydrogen fuel "heater" from fission fragments to neutron kinetic energy and in passing, he worked its way around the laws of thermodynamics without violating them.

What Teller instantly grasped was that, well, with the "hydrogen fuel heater" now being those mere 6% of energy, then the 94% related to fission fragments were readily available. And by some happy coincidence, his nuclear-pumped Excalibur exactly needed THAT: fission fragments energy ! And thus, the PUNTER / EXCALIBUR hybrid vehicle ended perfectly symbiotic: 6% of the energy to be used for propulsion, 94% for the laser: it was just too good to be true !

Another rather exciting development related to one of Teller disciples with the name of George Chapline. Just like Teller – and Dyson before them – he just couldn't stand the vision of 94% of the reactor output energy going to waste.

Fundamentally, Ted Taylor had kicked fission fragments out of the "hydrogen fuel heater for propulsion" business, replacing them with neutron kinetic energy NOT constrained by the laws of thermodynamics. All right then, said Chapline. We need to do something with the fission fragments. Teller of course would use them for Excalibur and lasering Soviet ICBMs. But Chapline wondered if he could not use them again for propulsion – except this time, without heating hydrogen fuel for expansion in a rocket nozzle, since Taylor neutrons were already doing that job, thank you.

Nope: Chapline come with the fantastic idea of shooting the fission fragments THEMSELVES in a nozzle, for direct propulsion. Dyson then stepped in and told him, he had had a similar idea when Taylor had got the PUNTER breakthrough circa 1964. It was in the vaning days of Orion and nuclear pulse: they were trying to pass both concepts to NASA only for the space agency nuclear czars Harold Finger and Milton Klein to refuse, in the name of NERVA, their own baby.

Taylor and Dyson answer was to dissecate NERVA and picks glaring holes in it. Their fundamental breakthrough come when they switched "hydrogen fuel heating" from fission fragments to neutron kinetic energy, in the process bypassing the irritating laws of thermodynamics with stupendous results: a specific impulse of 5000 to 13 000 seconds, rather than NERVA paltry 800 to 1000.

Taylor instantly embraced the cause of neutron kinetic energy yet Dyson pondered about the abandoned fission fragments. Twenty years later Chapline got the exact same reasoning; and from there, was born the FIssion Fragment Rocket Engine (FIFRE), with a whopping 1 million seconds specific impulse (!): 100 times higher than PUNTER, itself 10 times better than NERVA. A startled Chapline realized a FIFRE rocket could reach 5% of the speed of light !

As for pulsed-NTR, it was also the son of TRIGA, and TRIGA had been one of Teller many babies back in 1956. These reactors could be pulsed to 33 000 megawatts (!) without melting, - and this was just perfect to power a laser. They were also extremely safe, cheap, and plentiful: 66 had been build and deployed across the Western world universities, including in Africa.

All the above was music to the ears of Teller. The many pieces in the puzzle just gently fell into place. SDI technology – PUNTER – could be used to greatly energize NASA with extremely exciting spaceborne nuclear propulsion systems; which also happened to be closer from present state-of-the-art than the impossible gas-core-nuclear-rocket, in limbo since 1973 just like NERVA. It didn't took long for Teller henchmen Roderick Hyde and Lowell Wood to jump on that bandwagon. They touted a reborn space exploration program led, not by NASA or even the military but the nuclear laboratories : such as their own, Livermore.

Teller for his part come with the vision of what he called "the pop-up laser SSTO". Dozens or hundreds or thousands pulsed-NTR vehicles would jump out of Earth atmosphere - in suborbital or orbital flights - and zap Soviets missiles firing a variant of Excalibur X-ray laser powered by PUNTER fission fragments. In fact pulsed-NTR outstanding performance wiped out a more modest but extremely similar concept called TIMBERWIND, which had a 1000 seconds specific impulse, nuclear thermal pebble bed reactor as its centerpiece.
At 5000 to 13 000 seconds however, PUNTER simply buried it.

From TIMBERWIND, the pulsed-NTR faction borrowed a very smart concept.

They would create a rocket upper stage with such a fantastic specific impulse (5000 to 13 000 seconds !): not only could it haul itself in orbit; but it could do that with a giganormous payload, hundred if not thousands tons; and even dragging that, it could still make huge maneuvers in space and in orbit to dodge any Soviet interceptor.
And so PUNTER could ride a Minuteman, a Poseidon, a Peacekeeper or any existing NASA / USAF rocket – Delta – Atlas – Titan – as an upper stage. And such was its performance, the said rockets could now lift colossal payloads into Earth orbit with only the little finger and without breaking a sweat. In fact their existence and use to lift PUNTER in suborbital flight was only tolerated to avoid public fears of a nuclear rocket firing from Earth solid ground. Teller in passing was prompt to argue that PUNTER was an offspring of TRIGA, the safest reactor ever build.

...

When Gordon learned of this whacky schemes he felt more depressed than ever. His only consolation was that nobody thought of using his Agena or suborbital refueling vehicles for SDI - not with pulsed-NTR stratospheric promises inflated even further by Teller. He noted however that Graham himself worried about public opinion feelings about some hundreds nuclear SSTOs flying inside Earth atmosphere. Even if TRIGA was the epithome of safety, as joyfully noted by Teller, that beast was different.

The NERVA side of it was much less reassuring. Hans Bethe Union of Concerned Scientists lost no time underlying that point and picking holes in the system vaunted breathtaking performance numbers. Soon a murderous "science war" raged, Robert Jastrow and Teller leading the charge and taking a lot of flak from other nuclear scientists. At least he wouldn't be part of this, and neither would Gerald Bull, his gun-launched system being another collateral victim of pulsed-NTR launch vehicle advent. It didn't bothered him. There was still a need for a non-nuclear lifter to Earth orbit for NASA - roles for Agena and his suborbital refueling rocketplane. And there were still some technical doubts over pulsed-NTR safety and radiators.
Teller, of course, did not cared: he was drummming the hype like crazy.
 

Archibald

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Folks, I've discovered that NASA administrator in the late 70's (Robert Frosch) had been manager of VELA at ARPA in the early 60's; and then, Under Secretary for USN at the Pentagon between 1966 and 1973.

As such, he was involved in the XVF-12 versus Convair 200 decision in 1972. In fact he was manipulated by lower ranking USN officers to endorse the XFV-12 which proved unworkable.

Very well explained here.


So just for the fun of it... ITTL I have VELA (and thus Frosch) being taken "hostages" by Shoemaker and Teller for their own political agendas - a USAF lunar base.
Frosch ends rather burned and pissed-off, a lesson he won't forget. Including in 1972... he will uncover XVF-12 supporters shenanigans earlier, blast them, and endorse Convair 200 as a more reasonable solution.

And this (through GD Convair) will impact head-on F-16, YF-17, F-18 and F-20 - because Convair 201 and 218...
 

Archibald

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The Soviet counter-attack !
In the mid-70's I have NASA going suborbital docking, the FLOC way - enlisting Boeing.
As for the Air Force, they have put DARPA and Lockheed's Skunk Works on the suborbital refueling case.

(NASA and USAF are each others throats after the KH-9 spysat sunk the Shuttle all by itself, late 1971.
OTL it was the main reason why the Orbiter ended with a 60 ft long payload bay... and a lot of related issues of size and weight and cost over the next four decades.
Only for the NRO to decides, right from 1975, to NEVER launch ANY KH-9 with the Shuttle. Go figure ! ITTL, that issue sinks the Shuttle program... and NASA is quite pissed off at both USAF and NRO.)

You guess, that makes the Soviets a little nervous.

And this is their answer...

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Moscow, 1981

“First, a reminder about tripropellant basic rule: we want dense kerosene to burn first at takeoff, and then be gradually replaced by pure energy hydrogen during the difficult ascent to orbit.” Despite the heavy pressure, Lozino Lozinskiy was calm. “In our post-Spiral studies from 1975 we identified five distinct ways of reaping the benefits of kerosene high density and hydrogen pure energy.

The first two are well known: separate stages with separate fuels, Saturn V style; or just one stage with both fuels and thus three propellant tanks if liquid oxygen is included. We explored such tradeoffs with System 49, 49M and Bizan: we tried to find the best mix of kerosene NK-33 and hydrogen RD-57 engines, both developed for advanced N-1 variants. Our conclusions were clear enough: these two solutions are easy to implement but definitively not efficient at all.

The three others go a step further and very much integrate the hydrogen and kerosene engines together.

Solution 1 is two separate engines – hence, two separate turbopumps and combustion chambers - sharing the same nozzle; basically firing in the same hole and mixing their exhausts. That's what Rudi Beichel proposes at Aerojet.

Solution 2 integrates the two engines even further: through very sophisticated fuel injection and injectors, it manages to burn both kerosene and hydrogen into the same combustion chamber. A notable engineering feat considering how these two fuels are polar opposites, temperatures and density wise. That was our initial objective; we tentatively called that engine RD-701.

Both engines work in similar ways during ascent: kerosene first, then a gradual switch toward hydrogen. The only difference is where the switch happens, and how. Beichel gradually shuts down the kerosene engine in favor of the hydrogen one. We more or less do the same, but at the injectors level: we gradually shut the kerosene flow into the common combustion chamber while augmenting the hydrogen one. The tricky thing is that, not only their temperatures and densities are worlds apart; so are their respective mixture ratios. I mean: it takes a bit less than 3 oxygen to burn 1 kerosene; but as far as hydrogen is concerned, its 6 to 8 oxygen. Hence the liquid oxygen injectors must be carefully monitored; because reversing the ratios would instantly destroy performance, if not the engine itself.

And then there is solution 3, which is a compromise of both 1 and 2. Let me explain this. A common aspect of 1 and 2 is that both fire through the same nozzle with their combustion hot gases mixing together. That last point is all-important, because that's how you get the best of both fuels. Since both engines are in operation the effective area ratio has an efficient low value – and that's better when at sea level and in the lower atmosphere. Later in the ascent when the kerosene engine is shut down, it leaves the hydrogen engine alone to expand its gases to a higher area ratio – perfect when firing in the vacuum of space.

All right then, so we were laboring on these siamese engines, including their combustion chambers. In the case of 1, they remain separate but as a result, the engine is quite heavy. In the case of 2, the chambers are kind of fused together, but that make the common one a daunting engineering challenge; we had our metallurgists rather worried about it.

So we were discussing the matter with Lyulka and Kuznetsov when their aircraft side took over. They said “how about an afterburner then ?” And guess what an afterburner is ? It is kind of second combustion chamber - except in the nozzle, not in the engine core.

Lyulka and Kuznetsov then said: burn the kerosene into a dedicated combustion chamber, NK-33 style; then turn the nozzle into the hydrogen very own combustion chamber. By injecting the said hydrogen and its LOX, near the throat and in the supersonic section of the nozzle. That's paramount; and there, we had our breakthrough.

We keep the most important aspect of 1 and 2 engines, remember: kerosene-lox-combustion-gases and hydrogen-lox-combustion-gases mixing and exiting through the same nozzle : getting the best of both fuels. Except we achieve that a) without the weight burden of either separated engines and combustion chambers; and b) without the metallurgy big headache of a common LH2 / RP-1 combustion chamber. Maybe not as efficient, but far lighter and easier to build.

So, where do we go from there ?

Ideally we would go, first, with that smart workaround. And then, we would ask Kuznetsov and Lyulka to pull a Beichel by getting their NK-33 and RD-57 firing through a common nozzle, mixing their hot gases. And finally, they would literally merge the NK-33 and RD-57 separate combustion chambers into one; with only the LOX / LH2 / RP-1 respective injectors remaining apart; back to the RD-701 initial plan.

But we are in a hurry, because of that rather unexpected breakthrough on the American side. Suborbital refueling or docking: nobody would have bet a dime on this only five years ago. The only clue was Aerospaceplane HIRES brief discussion of refueling at Mach 6 and testing that with the X-15s. A good case could make they come tantalizing close from the breakthrough back then, but somewhat picked the wrong X-15 record and flight profile. Don't refuel at Mach 6 and 100 000 feet, well inside the turbulent atmosphere and hypersonic shockwave; pick instead that 354 000 ft height record. To refuel high there; safely out of the atmosphere and on a short segment of orbit: four minutes of zero-G parabola. No hypersonic shockwave, heat barrier nor turbulence there.

Whatever, those smart Americans have put our backs against a wall. That's why I think we should go all out for the two lowest risk approaches, in parallel: the Beichel and nozzle ones; while refining the RD-701 “ideal” one over the long term.

What we need exactly is a joint Kuznestsov / Lyulka team working on the two approaches the following way. First, getting a NK-33 and RD-57 firing together into a common nozzle. And in parallel: Lyulka adding their RD-57 LOX& LH2 propellant injectors into a NK-33 nozzle. That's how we should proceed.

As for the RD-701 “common combustion chamber” I suggest we put Glushko's Energomash on the case, in cooperation with Lyulka and Kuznetsov; borrowing from their experience. This way we have the cream of our rocket engine industry; the best brains trying to crack the case of tripropellant engines and their variations."​

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Variation on OTL MAKS and its RD-701 smart but complicated engine. Without Buran and Glushko, Lozino has a free hand to improve Spiral (49, 49M, Bizan), in a way that diverges from our universe.

 
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Archibald

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Some called it a bestiary or a zoo of names. Fact was that General Shoemaker methodically created a nomenclature related to that whole new combination: of one bomber, one booster and one Agena spysat.
Unlike NASA he had a real talent - a knack to pull names out of dry accronyms.

Air Launched Agena was ALA: the spanish word for "wing".

The spysats, then.

Air Launch would rather logically add "AL", in front of
the spysat familiar codename.
And thus he got:
ALAMOS for Air Launch SAMOS
ALCOR for CORONA
ALGA for GAMBIT (and flying FROG later)
ALLAN for LANYARD
ALGO for ARGON
ALQUIL for the radarsat.

And then came the boosters & Agena combinations

CAGE with a Scout's Castor.
PAGE for Polaris
SAGE for Skybolt
MAGE for Minuteman

The latter prevailed and thereafter MAGE combined with the three
bombers carrying it: Stratofortress, Hustler and Valkyrie.

And thus were born VALMA, SALMA and HUMA.
 
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Michel Van

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we tried to find the best mix of kerosene NK-33 and hydrogen RD-57 engines, both developed for advanced N-1 variants.
i already see the scene were Military explain to Glushko and Kuznetsov, their demands and go for the Lozino proposal.
and how Glushko and Kuznetsov "disliked" each other as competitor, that will be nasty catfight...
 

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The Soviet space program was like that memorable TV show of the 80's: DALLAS.
Glushko was J.R. Ewings (machiavellian)
Mishin was Sue Ellen (often drunk)
Chelomei was Bobby Ewings... (the unhappy one)
 

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Glushko is not working with Kuznetsov - Lyulka is. Glushko work is only a long term bonus, if it ever made to work.
 

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