C-130 V/STOL modification projects

Jemiba

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This project probably fits into several other threads, too, a VTOL
version of the C-130 Hercules, designed by Rockwell.
It was intended to use the thrust-augmented concept, as in the
XFV-12, and my have failed in the same way !
(from Aviation Week 1975 14-21)
 

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elmayerle

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Jemiba said:
This project probably fits into several other threads, too, a VTOL
version of the C-130 Hercules, designed by Rockwell.
It was intended to use the thrust-augmented concept, as in the
XFV-12, and my have failed in the same way !
(from Aviation Week 1975 14-21)
It almost certainly would have failed the same way. There seems to be some "scale up" problem with thrust augmented ejector systems that prevents model and scale test results from being realized with full scale articles.
 

Antonio

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VTOL
version of the C-130 Hercules, designed by Rockwell.
That's the North American NA-382: A VSTOL Hercules Replacement with 4 GE F101


http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2140.msg601.html#msg601
 

flateric

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"Engine manufacturers are understandably eager to leverage their investment in new engine models by finding as
many airframe applications as possible, and this was no different for the XJ99. The launch application for the XJ99
was the US/FRG fighter. Although this aircraft development program was subsequently canceled, the XJ99
development continued,. The XJ99 had become an engine without an aircraft to use it. One idea put forward was to
turn the C-130 into a V/STOL transport. Figure [...] shows a model of the V/STOL C-130 and the details of the lift
engine pod."

AIAA 2007-5340
Rolls-Royce and Allison Lift Engines
Daniel T. Jensen1 and John M. Leonard2
Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust Allison Branch, Indianapolis, Indiana 46206
 

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stevoe

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flateric said:
...One idea put forward was to
turn the C-130 into a V/STOL transport. Figure [...] shows a model of the V/STOL C-130 and the details of the lift
engine pod...
Very interesting pictures, thank you!
Found this on my harddisc...
 

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Sentinel Chicken

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Were those lift engine pods designed to be removable so the Herk could be flown as a conventional CTOL aircraft if VSTOL wasn't needed?
 

flateric

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I think that you can remove/install everything per se, but no mention of it in my sources. I remember another paper on VSTOL C-130 but need to dig into terabytes tomorrow.
 

spectre

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flateric said:
I think that you can remove/install everything per se, but no mention of it in my sources. I remember another paper on VSTOL C-130 but need to dig into terabytes tomorrow.
I for one would love to see/read that...
 

flateric

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1987 P&W/DeHavilland study of modified C-130 using Three Stream Turbofan - variable cycle engine with integral turbo compressor

In support of DeHavilland Aircraft application studies (=Boeing/deHavilland Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft), Pratt & Whitney conducted a preliminary design study of
a three-stream turbofan engine to power an Augmentor-Wing, STOL transport based on a C-130 aircraft.
The study objective was to define a relatively inexpensive C-130 derivative with 1000 to 1500 foot takeoff and landing
capability as a demonstrator with the potential for special operations utility. DeHavilland completed Ihe preliminary design of the Augmentor-Wing for a C-130 and supplied the following propulsion system requirements to Pratt & Whitney for an engine candidate:

- Two engines, each producing 24000 Ib of thrust and the equivalent of 7000 Ib thrust at 2.5 pressure ratio for powered lift
- Total net thrust of each engine modulatable from 6000 Ib to 24000 Ib with bleed supply at constant momentum for low-speed approach during landing
- Cruise fuel consumption commensurate with matching or extending conventional C-130 range/payload.

AIAA-87-2104
Three Stream Turbofan-Variable Cycle Engine With Integral Turbo Compressor
G. M. Perkins
Pratt & Whitney
West Palm Beach, FL
 

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archipeppe

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This project seems to have some point of contacts with the original draft for the Aeritalia (now Alenia Aeronautica) G 222 "Cervino", eventually evoluted into G222 first and C27 then.

The original G222 project foresee a VTOL cargo aircraft with two turboprops, squared fuselage section and vertical jet pods designed to provide logistic support to FIAT G95 V/STOL supersonic fighters.

When the G95 family vanished, the G222 lose its VTOL capability remaining a pure STOL cargo.
 

flateric

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Fiat G 55/4 VTOL and Fiat G 222 VTOL variants thread http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3466.0.html
 

hesham

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Hi,

a tilt-wing C-130.
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19930001553_1993001553.pdf
 

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Grzesio

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chemnitzer27kb.blogspot.com
By the way - I've once seen a film of a STOL modification of the C-130, equipped with a number of powerful solid fuelled take-off and braking rockets mounted on fuselage sides. This aircraft was tested in 1970s if I remember correctly?

Regards

Grzesio
 

frank

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IIRC, that was the design used in the ill-fated Iranian hostage rescue attempt in 1980.

Grzesio said:
By the way - I've once seen a film of a STOL modification of the C-130, equipped with a number of powerful solid fuelled take-off and braking rockets mounted on fuselage sides. This aircraft was tested in 1970s if I remember correctly?

Regards

Grzesio
 

Skybolt

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Let's not forget the C-130 BLC, an extreme STOL tested in late '50s with two jet under the outer wings that provided air to blow the upper wing and the flaps. Lockheed promoted it as a possibile submission to NMBR.4. The company offered it for license construction in Europe, and even ran ad on the trade press explicitly offering it.
 
M

McColm

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Hi there,
Lockheed developed a "float plane" convertion kit known as the CL-130 for the Herk to land on water. They tested their design on a third scale model and found that the payload and range was cut by 30% due to the weight and drag.
The C-130J has improved range and payload. If a one-step hull was bolted on to the fuselage with mid sponsors the engines would be raised high enough so that no floats would be deployed. A podded jet engine on each wing would give the Herk the extra boost on takeoff.
The hull could be designed to scoop fresh water from lakes as a water bomber or be deployed by the Navy or Coast Guard in Search & Rescue missions. Even the option of a commercial airline might make this idea seem viable.
Has this idea been tested?
 

flateric

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http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2860.msg22915/highlight,c-130+float.html#msg22915
 

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hesham

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hesham said:
Hi,

a tilt-wing C-130.
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19930001553_1993001553.pdf
Also from Popular Science magazine;

http://books.google.com.eg/books?id=oEq7DfCg8v0C&pg=PA26&dq=tilt-wing+transport+C-130&hl=ar&ei=A5ykTPfuApTNjAfV_-CjDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=true
 

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Stargazer2006

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Hesham, this is nowhere near a Herc!!!
 

Antonio

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Hesham, this is nowhere near a Herc!!!
It's a McDD proposal for a C-130 replacement as noted in the text
 

hesham

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Sorry for this mistake.
 

Batman10

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frank said:
IIRC, that was the design used in the ill-fated Iranian hostage rescue attempt in 1980.

Grzesio said:
By the way - I've once seen a film of a STOL modification of the C-130, equipped with a number of powerful solid fuelled take-off and braking rockets mounted on fuselage sides. This aircraft was tested in 1970s if I remember correctly?

Regards

Grzesio
I happen to own the rights to the Credible Sport Footage.
I also have hundreds of documents related to teh project and have interviewed many of the principles involved in the program.
The "CREDIBLE SPORT" or XSC-130 H, YMC-130 H, YSC-130 H, etc. SUPER STOL PROGRAM. Defined on Lockheed top drawing No. 3319810. This program was declassified according to the Secretary of the Air Force and the DOD in 1986.

Some Individuals involved with the program were. Ray C. Doyle, TSgt Kenneth L. Bancroft, Mr. Klenke, O. C. Brockington was program manager, Capt McCommon, Capt Crombie, Mr Walt Dunn, Mr. Henson Contracting Officer, Mr. Mullins, Mr. Stauble, Mr. Sweeny Capt. Collins, Mike Engel, Leo Cambone, Bob Harper, Tom Pinkerton, Tom Craves, Rich Engel, Dirk Prather, Bouie Kendal, Col Karl Jones, Capt. Jack Brooks, Ken Paddin, Col. Joe Birt Lt. Col Raddin, Mr. Jim Brinkley, Mr. Buford Toole, Mr. Davidson, Mr. Schott, Mr. Elgin Werbeck, Mr. Schniral, Mr. Decker, Mr. Allan Coates, Mr. Dave Carpenter, Mr. Lou Renner, Mr. Ken Thorsted, Joseph A. Losier. W. E. Carven. Contract F33657-81-C-2154

Statement of Work, LG 81ERO 196, Revised 29 July 1981

Colonel Ronald W. Terry Lessons Learned Project Credible Sport January 1981 paper. QSD Memorandum to SAF, 8 Aug 80 (S) HQ USAF/PA/XO/RD Msg. 072230Z Aug 80 (S) Lockheed Georgia Top Drawing # 3319810

Many organizations participated in CREDIBLE SPORT and directly contributed to its success. They are:

Department of the Army, White Sands Missile Range. Headquarters Department of the Navy, Naval Ordnance Station, Indian Head Maryland. Naval Surface Weapons Center Dahlgren Virginia Naval Weapons Center, China Lake California. Patuxtent River NAS, Maryland. Naval Air Test Center Headquarters, United States Air Force Headquarters Air Force Systems Command Armament Division Aeronautical Systems Division Air Force Wright-Aeronautical Laboratories Air Force Rocket Propulsion laboratory Air Force Human Resources Laboratory Air Force Logistics Command. Tactical Air Command

Jane's published some information regarding these aircraft in 1997 or 1998.

History of the program:

The "CREDIBLE SPORT" PROGRAM.

After the failure of the hostage rescue mission in Iran on April 24, 1980. The Office of the Secretary of Defense Directorate approached Lockheed Georgia to modify 3 C-130 H aircraft for a planned second Hostage Rescue mission to Iran.

In July of 1980 the Air Force was given the task of providing a quick reaction force response team to manage the OSD program. The QRF Team included the following individuals: General Bart Krawetz, Lt. Col. Terry, Major Pete W. Moates or Coates and Colonel Ken Belden. Who went to Lockheed Georgia and hand picked an engineering team for the "Credible Sport" program. A multi-service Special Operations Forces program.

The "Credible Sport" phase I program was initiated by the OSD directorate and was designed to validate S.T.O.L. approach configuration and associated avionics.

The airframes for CS Phase I were tested in September and October 1980.

The "Credible Sport" I program was a response to a quick reaction force requirement for heavyweight aircraft, modified for short field, takeoff and landing capability.

The original CS I aircraft was a single point design and only explored a limited portion of the flying envelope. The CS I aircraft were designed for a specific, limited mission.

The Phase I program did not possess the normal margins of safety required for peace time operations.

The following 3 C-130 H airframes were pulled out of active Air Force service inventory and were considered expendable. These airframes were modified from April to August 1980 as follows: To Y M C-130 H configuration.

LOCKHEED # CS, Phase I [C.n.] # 4658 382 c-41 d A.F. Serial Number 74-1683, Airframe #1 Assigned to the 463 Tactical Air Wing Oct 1977 to Sept 1980. Modified to a YMC-130 H configuration for a rescue operation in Iran. With a C-141 in-flight refueling pod, DC-130 type radome. 30 Rockets total (ASROC engines provided by the Navy) pointing Forward and downward on the forward and rear fuselage. This was the first airframe modified. It was tested at Duke field Eglin AFB. It flew approximately 4 test flights there. This aircraft crashed at a demonstration on Oct 29, 1980 with, I believe Col. Belden as pilot in command. The airframe was buried at Duke field Eglin AFB after the crash.

CS Phase II [C.n.] # 4669 382 c-41 d 74-1686 Airframe #2 Assigned to the 463 T A W September 1976 to 1980. Modified to Y M C-130 H. 4950 Tactical Air Wing November 1982 to October 1987. Modified for a rescue operation in Iran. Modified as 74-1683. This airframe was used for experimental testing purposes at Warner Robins AFB. These test provided the foundation and prototype testing for the Combat Talon II aircraft. This airframe was DE-modified and given to the Warner Robins museum in March 1988.

[C.n.] # 4667 382 c-41 d 74-2065, Airframe #3 was Assigned to the 463 T A W Oct 1977 to Sept 1980. This airframe was never completely modified to YMC-130H configuration and was used as a test platform for form fit and function of parts. The Rockets were never fitted. This Airframe was DE-modified in November 1984 at Lockheed Ontario. Painted in Lizard Camouflage scheme February 1988. Oct. 1991 assigned to the 773AS to present day.

THE MISSION

These aircraft were to take off from Eglin AFB in Florida; and refuel in-flight on the way to Iran; then land in the Amjadien soccer stadium across the street from the U. S. Embassy in Teheran Iran; with the intention of extracting the American Hostages from the Embassy in Tehran Iran. After rescuing the Hostage these aircraft were to land on a Nimitz size carrier in the Persian Gulf.

These airframes were specially modified to take off and land in a very short distance (specifically the Amjadien or Amjadieh soccer stadium across the street from the U. S. Embassy in Teheran Iran).

Airframe modification included but were not limited to the following modifications:

Take off and landing capability was as follows to make a ground clearance of 90 feet at 600 feet from the starting point as was the case for testing in 1980. The airframe was fitted with an array of 30 Rockets on the airframe. 8 ASROC (Zenith) engines pointing forward in fairings on the fuselage side 8 pointing straight down along the forward fuselage at the wheel wells to cushion the landing and fire approximately 6 inches from the ground for reverse thrust augmentation.

For takeoff 8 ASROC engines provided lift pointing back and down on rear fuselage and 6 smaller rocket engines (Platypus) 2 on each wing pylon mount and 2 on the rear fuselage forward of the beaver tail to prevent over rotation of the airframe.

Horsal (Horsals) fins were installed forward of the Horizontal stabilizers, a Dorsal fin was fitted on the rudder spine, the flaps were double slotted, and the ailerons were extended. An In-flight refueling pod from a C-141, was installed on the fuselage center line. A tail hook was fitted forward of the rear cargo door; for the planned carrier landing.

Avionics modifications were as follows: A DC-130 type radome with a F.L.I.R. turret was installed on the nose. This F.L.I.R. turret was slaved to the on board computer and in combination with the F.L.I.R. telemetry and mission avionics fired the forward pointing rockets 20 feet above the ground. 30 Rockets were installed on the airframe. 8 ASROC (Zenith) engines pointing forward in fairings on the fuselage side; 8 pointing straight down to cushion the landing by the wheel wells and fire approx. 6 to 12 inches above the ground. For takeoff 8 ASROC engines provided lift pointing backwards and down on the side of the fuselage, with 6 smaller rocket engines (Platypus) 2 on each wing pylon mount and 2 on the rear fuselage under the beaver tail to prevent over rotation of the airframe.

Credible Sport II Phase I 24 August to 11 November 1981. The purpose of CS II was to satisfy prototype test requirements for Combat Talon II avionics and unique airframe modifications. The vehicle being tested for CS II program is configured as the end configuration from the CS I project.

The STOL capability would allow CT II aircraft to operate from landing zones of 1500 feet or less (over a 50-ft obstacle) at 140,000 gross weight.

To provide 1500 foot landing capability, CT-II would be configured with aerodynamic modifications including horsal and dorsal fins, double slotted flaps, and extended ailerons -- no reverse thrust augmentation is required to meet the 1500-ft criteria. The 1500-ft takeoff capability would require some thrust augmentation. The thrust augmentation would entail a proven low-risk development effort.

Phase II testing ended in 1986 or 87.

The HTTB Program

As a result of the Data gathered from the Credible Sport program, in February 1984 the HTTB program was established. In June 1984 a L-100-20 N130X was modified as the HTTB. Some of the engineering and experience gained from the CS Phase 1,2 programs were incorporated into the design of the HTTB; I.E. enlarged ailerons Horsal (Horsals) fins a Dorsal fin and double slotted-flaps, and S.T.O.L. telemetry and avionics instrumentation. On February 3, 1993 the HTTB Crashed at Dobbins AFB GA. During a high speed ground test run, it lifted off, veered left and crashed.
 

flateric

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Batman, thank you!
 

Batman10

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Your Welcome to all.

Here are some Drawings of the Credible Sport YMC-130 Hercules.
Next drawings of the HTTB.


















 

Batman10

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The Genesis of the Hercules Stol modifications began in the 1960's. However it was not until the 1970's, when Lockheed was

contracted by the USAF to propose a C-130 with a wider and higher fuselage to compete with the C-17. Thus was the C-130SS

Stretched Stol idea born. This idea would later Result in the Credible Sport YMC-130H and the HTTB or High Technology Testbed.

Now Lockheed is proposing a Wide body C-130.
Lockheed Martin confirms studies are under way for a new version of the C-130 featuring a wider fuselage to accommodate a

proposed class of US Army ground vehicles entering service after 2015. The enlarged airlifter would compete against the Airbus

Military A400M and Boeing's proposed C-17B to support the army's Future Combat System.
So this design has been around since the 1970s or for 40 years.

So Feast your eyes upon the HTTB. I had the pleasure to work at Lockheed Ontario from 1986 to 1990 and obtained many of these

Drawings there. I had a personal tour of the HTTB by one of the Pilots, I climbed all over the airplane and measured nearly every

special modified part of the airplane.








































In memory of those who Perished in February 1993.

 

AeroFranz

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I did feast!
excellent stuff, thanks!
 

taildragger

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Interesting that some of the drawings revert to a lower profile radome not much bigger that those fitted to the prototypes and initial production examples. I suspect that Lockheed could package the radar in a significantly smaller volume than was required in the mid-1950's but that the Hercules' nose profile has become a trademark that's left unchanged for commercial reasons.
Also, does anyone know what a tiperon is?

Taildragger
 

Stargazer2006

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taildragger said:
Also, does anyone know what a tiperon is?
Considering the picture this term appeared in, I would guess it's a combination "tip" and "aileron" and thus refers to the extensions at the wingtips...
 

flateric

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Batman, Credible Sport stuff is incredible - I thought I will never see something like this. thank you again for your priceless input!
 

AeroFranz

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Stargazer2006 said:
taildragger said:
Also, does anyone know what a tiperon is?
Considering the picture this term appeared in, I would guess it's a combination "tip" and "aileron" and thus refers to the extensions at the wingtips...
That sounds right. The tiperon appears in only one picture, so maybe it wasn't that effective or worth the expense to test it out. Interesting concept though! Some other pictures mention an increased chord/span aileron, that's probably the easiest/cheapest way of increasing slow speed roll authority.

As a side note, the tiperon reminds me of something seen on the Martin Kitten III of 1918-1919. I attached a picture from the aerofiles website. NOtice partially retractable landing gear. The only Kitten remaining is hanging from the ceiling in one of the Garber hangars.
 

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AeroFranz

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I think it's a Groen Gyrolifter thing (as in Groen bros. gyroplane)
 

Stargazer2006

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AeroFranz said:
I think it's a Groen Gyrolifter thing (as in Groen bros. gyroplane)
Yeah! I just KNEW I had this somewhere. It's the Groen Gyrolifter. Thanks for the reminder, AeroFranz.
 

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Batman10

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Can you imagine the engine needed to lift the C-130 and how much Cargo area the Engine and gear box would use up?

Amazing to think about. I like the idea.
 
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