ASW Chinook

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Reading 'Wings on my Sleeve' by Capt Eric 'Winkle' Brown later I discovered that the RN in the 1960s had shortlisted two new ASW helicopters to equip the CVA-01 to replace the Gannet.

The choice was either the Seaking or the Chinook. He saw advantages in the Chinook, it could use its dipping sonar better in stronger winds etc and with foldable rotors took up less hangar space.

Has anyone ever seen any details of an ASW variant? Did the USN trial one?
 
I would presume that any ASW efforts tested on CH-46s would read directly across to its larger sibling, the CH-47. The answer may lie there.
 
Did the Sea King not have folding rotor blades? I'm having trouble picturing a Chinook taking up less space than a Sea King, folding blades or not.
 
I thought the same thing, the Seaking does have folding blades and I can't believe a Chinook will take less space. Of course of destroyers it would have been far too big.

Capt. Eric Brown got as far as test flying a standard Chinook so some serious deisgn work must have begun if things got this far.
 
I thought the same thing, the Seaking does have folding blades and I can't believe a Chinook will take less space. Of course of destroyers it would have been far too big.

Capt. Eric Brown got as far as test flying a standard Chinook so some serious deisgn work must have begun if things got this far.
There's no record of the Royal Navy evaluating the Chinook, and because Eric Brown went to the Boeing-Vertol plant and flew the Chinook, not to mention his unease about the Chinook's mechanical complexity, it is possible that the Royal Navy found the Sea King less complex than the Chinook for the ASW role.
 
I thought the same thing, the Seaking does have folding blades and I can't believe a Chinook will take less space. Of course of destroyers it would have been far too big.

Capt. Eric Brown got as far as test flying a standard Chinook so some serious deisgn work must have begun if things got this far.
There's no record of the Royal Navy evaluating the Chinook, and because Eric Brown went to the Boeing-Vertol plant and flew the Chinook, not to mention his unease about the Chinook's mechanical complexity, it is possible that the Royal Navy found the Sea King less complex than the Chinook for the ASW role.

I think you need to read my book The Admiralty and the Helicopter. There is a whole chapter on the NASR.358 studies which included Chinook, and the reasons why it was abandoned in favour of the Sea King.
 
Indeed, why revisit decades-old threads when the latest research on these subjects is available from Blue Envoy Press? Our helicopter books are probably the most up to date information on British helicopters you can find.

Chris
 
Indeed, why revisit decades-old threads when the latest research on these subjects is available from Blue Envoy Press? Our helicopter books are probably the most up to date information on British helicopters you can find.

Chris

Fixed that for you, Chris :)
 
I think if V.D. spent some time in either the ProjectTech Profiles and the Bookshelf and Marketplace sections, he might be amazed to find just how many of the membership actually have the books he keeps mentioning ----
 

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