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American Aerospace Archive - The B-52 Competition of 1946…and Dark Horses from Douglas, 1947-1950

Greetings All,

The third issue of The American Aerospace Archive is now available:


3329528305_ba273f7597.jpg


In this issue, we examine proposals submitted to the Army Air Force heavy bombardment competition of 1946, which ultimately yielded the legendary Boeing B-52. Though Boeing won the initial competition, it struggled to keep the contract as changing Air Force requirements and rival companies put intense pressure on the program. One of its most aggressive competitors was Douglas Aircraft, which submitted scores of strategic bomber studies from 1947-50 in an effort to reopen the contract to competition. The magazine covers the following studies:

- Boeing Model 462 (the winner - 3 variants)
- Convair Long Range Heavy Bombardment Airplane (forward swept wing bomber depicted on cover)
- Martin Model 216 (”flying aircraft carrier” - 2 variants)
- Martin Model 232 (description only)
- Douglas Very Long Range Bomber C (VLRB-C - 2 variants)
- Douglas Model 1112 (heavy bomber derivative of XB-42 - 3 variants)
- Douglas Model 1155 (interim jet bomber derived from DC-6 - 2 variants)
- Douglas Model 1211 (giant swept wing turboprop bomber - 40 variants)
- Bonus drawings of Douglas X-3 Stiletto photo reconnaissance aircraft mounted under a B-36 and Douglas impressions of the Boeing B-52 (2 variants)

Notable Model 1211 configurations include the Model 1211-J “mother ship,” which was designed to carry photo reconnaissance versions of the Douglas X-3 Stiletto and the XF4D-1 Skyray; the Model 1211-J missile carrier, which featured a large air-to-surface missile mounted on top of the fuselage (possible an early version of the NAA Navaho); and the Model 1211T-55, a truly giant aircraft with a span of 262′ and a length of 207′ 2″. This 60 page magazine features 77 illustrations, photos and artist’s impressions, the majority published here for the first time. It is printed in full color on high quality 80 lb semi-gloss paper with saddle-stitched covers.

For a full preview of the magazine, please visit MagCloud. The magazine, which is almost twice as thick as the last two, is priced at a reasonable $14.95. US, UK and Canadian customers should order the magazine directly through MagCloud.

Best Regards,

Jared Zichek
 
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jzichek

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Yes, you were absolutely right, robunos. I hesitated to update the issue till I had solid documentary confirmation from the Douglas report on the Model 1211R-45 through 1211X-55 studies, (a full summary of which can be found on pp. 17-21 of "Mother Ships, Parasites and More..."). I'm still not 100% certain of which exact engines were used for the early Model 1211 studies; the nacelle contours changed as the series evolved, which may imply changes in power plants. Hopefully concrete info will eventually emerge.
 

robunos

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Well, I have 'Motherships' downloaded as well, looking forward to reading it in due course...


cheers,
Robin.
 

blackkite

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When I saw Martin model 216-1 flying wing drawing, I had following impression.
(1)Each wing four engine propeller thrust line direction are different. Outer two engine propeller thrust line are almost horizontal, but inner two engine propeller thrust line directed upward.
(2)Engin cooling is by skin cooler? I see many steam cooling channel at wing cross section upper surface.
(3)Engine side round device is turbo supercharger?
(4)Engine intake air outlet nozzle is located wing under surface.
(5)Engine air intake size is very large. Engine is liquid cooling type, but located in air flow. Why?
 

starviking

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blackkite said:
When I saw Martin model 216-1 flying wing drawing, I had following impression.
(1)Each wing four engine propeller thrust line direction are different. Outer two engine propeller thrust line are almost horizontal, but inner two engine propeller thrust line directed upward.
(2)Engin cooling is by skin cooler? I see many steam cooling channel at wing cross section upper surface.
(3)Engine side round device is turbo supercharger?
(4)Engine intake air outlet nozzle is located wing under surface.
(5)Engine air intake size is very large. Engine is liquid cooling type, but located in air flow. Why?

On (1), could this have been an attempt to deal with CG bombload issues? It would seem that altering the power for the inner, upward-inclined engines could add extra pitch control.
 

blackkite

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starviking said:
blackkite said:
When I saw Martin model 216-1 flying wing drawing, I had following impression.
(1)Each wing four engine propeller thrust line direction are different. Outer two engine propeller thrust line are almost horizontal, but inner two engine propeller thrust line directed upward.
(2)Engin cooling is by skin cooler? I see many steam cooling channel at wing cross section upper surface.
(3)Engine side round device is turbo supercharger?
(4)Engine intake air outlet nozzle is located wing under surface.
(5)Engine air intake size is very large. Engine is liquid cooling type, but located in air flow. Why?

On (1), could this have been an attempt to deal with CG bombload issues? It would seem that altering the power for the inner, upward-inclined engines could add extra pitch control.
HmHmHm.......Thanks a lot. :D I confirm that engine is liquid cooling turbocharged R-7755 by Jared-san's book.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lycoming_XR-7755

XR-7755 restoration.
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjr/engines/x7restored/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lry0f21aPZI
Slide.
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjr/engines/Engineweb_files/v3_document.htm
 

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