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Author Topic: German AGLT  (Read 2660 times)

Offline Würger

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German AGLT
« on: October 15, 2008, 08:00:48 am »
Hi ;),

do you know about "Village Inn"? It was a Automatic Gun-Laying Turret, laid by radar and developed by the british since 1943.

What about a german AGLT?

Please notice the second aircraft profile. That late model tail turret has yagi antennae, and that bulge isn`t a periscopic head as in the early models. Could this be the first attempt at this subject? Image from Heinz Nowarra`s "Die Deutsche Luftrustung", 2º volume.

Hopping to know from you, guys.

Offline Basil

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2019, 11:14:21 am »
Your question is a few days old  ;) but I am curious if you have found out something in the meantime. As you certainly know there were German developments in blind firing weapon turrets (Heckenrose, etc.). However I had no luck in finding a useful technical description of such systems.

Offline Würger

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2019, 02:46:16 pm »
Hi Basil, I do have something more on German AGLT but give me some time, I'm out for the moment.

Offline lastdingo

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2019, 02:54:11 pm »
The only German automatic gunlaying development was AFAIK not advanced in development and about a weapon of 55 mm calibre (medium AAA).
http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNGER_55_Gerat58.php

The rear antennas on German multi-engine aircraft are warning radars (Neptun R2 and R3 versions, for example).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptun_(radar)

Night fighters did have automatic fire modes (automated trigger pulling) for fixed forward-firing guns (using their main radar).



Offline lastdingo

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2019, 02:57:27 pm »
https://weaponsandwarfare.com/2017/04/27/5-cm-flak-41-5-5-cm-gerat-58/

Quote
5.5 cm Gerät 58

Was designed as part of an integrated weapons system which included radar and fire control equipment. The development started in 1943 but not concluded before the end of the war.

Offline Basil

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2019, 11:16:58 am »
@ Würger,

thx. Detailed information would be highly appreciated.

@ lastdingo,

thx for the link. Yes, Gerät 58 with its computerized aiming would have been an advanced mobile medium altitude flak. There was also a planned version for fighter aircrafts for attacking bombers outside the reach of its defensive armament (it was calculated that a bomber would be shot down with a 95 % probability at a distance of 2000 m in 7,9 sec firing duration, and from 1500 m in 4,8 sec).

Just for info concerning the aglt for aircrafts - many of the German 1945 nightfighter projects had a blindfiring tail gun connected to a parabolic radar dish.

Offline Basil

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2019, 07:43:43 am »
Würger,

just asking - any chance of getting some additional info in German AGLTs?

Thx in advance.

Offline Würger

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2019, 03:23:09 pm »
In CIOS File report XXX-118", Radio & Radar Research Establishments of the German Services Ministries", page 33, we can know that the british AGLT "Village Inn" was captured and "quite efficiently" analised by FFO, most probably the best scientific institution devoted to airborne electronics in Germany, by the end of 1944. I recall the americans were quite surprised to know that FFO had understood and started to jam the "Loran" navigation system within two weeks.
In the same report, page 58, a Dr. Krüger from the TAL (Technische Akademie der Luftwaffe) in Bad Blankenburg, when interrogated by allied officers said he had worked with AGLT using first yagi aerials, later changing to dieletric antennae.
The Heinkel P.1061 Ia with Jumo 222 above seems to have a radar similar to the Pauke-A, but please see this image, taken from US Naval Technical Mission in Europe, Technical Report 349-45, German Aicraft Armament - Turrets & Remote Control Mounts
It shows a set of yagi antennae, coupled to the remote control mount. The contents relate to Rheinmetall-Borsig, unfortunatelly not taking in consideration the electronic part of the subsystem, but it should be a range only radar, used in conjunction with the EZ44 gyro sight, which it fed.
According Leo Brandt the germans were working at the 1st of July of 1944 in the "Schwenk-Pauke", a centimetric (3,1-3,2 cm) gun-laying radar for swiveling gun mounts, a work undertaken by Telefunken and Loewe-Opta. They had under study the use of auto-tracking coupled to a computer (AEG, LGW and FFO) and, at the same date, were considering using PPI screens to allocate targets to battle stations, e.g. in a heavy bomber.
Finally, the Heckenrose, a tail radar controlling rear gun mounts. I recall a post-war report by Brunolf Baade stating the Heckenrose was a Junkers idea, but we can see it in other companies projects as well. Leo Brandt also mentions it, not as a radar per se but as the installations name.

Offline Basil

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2019, 05:36:49 am »
Würger,

these are highly interesting pieces of information. Are any of these sources available?

Offline Würger

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Re: German AGLT
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2019, 07:54:34 am »
Quote
these are highly interesting pieces of information. Are any of these sources available?

No, I bought copies from NARA and the IWM. Do not rely on Internet informations repeated/copied over and over again and most usually posted by someone with a scant knowledge of the subjects. Primary (and secundary) sources are the only ones you should consider, and even those must be abridged, crossed with other sources and put in context. My experience tells that british post-war reports tend to be biased and performed by unprofessional personnel, with some masterly exceptions. To grasp this reason please read Tom Bower`s "The Paperclip Conspiracy" and, to a lesser degree, Sean Longden`s "T-Force, the Forgotten Hero`s of 1945". Also this website, where Arthur Bauer deconstructs many myths:

http://www.cdvandt.org/index.htm

Take your time browsing this website, which is packed with excellent information on german electronics, although is isn`t by far complete. And resort to archives whenever possible.