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Author Topic: Lockheed L-133 A & B  (Read 29925 times)

Offline Justo Miranda

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Lockheed L-133 A & B
« on: February 09, 2008, 05:38:02 pm »
From Air Enthusiast /Eleven

Offline FarSight

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Lockheed L-1000
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2008, 01:38:36 am »
There is at least one L-1000 turbojet still intact:

http://hyperscale.com/features/2002/l133tc_1.htm

Nathan Price did quite a job!

Offline red admiral

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2008, 04:55:41 am »
It is doubtful the L-1000 turbojet ever worked and the stats convince me that it couldn't have ever worked. Theres more chance of Griffith's CR.1/2 32 (IIRC) spool double reverse flow turbofan working.

The L-1000 has a pressure ratio of 25(or 17?) from a two spool compressor with 32 stages. Driving this is a four stage turbine. Somehow the engine weighs 1543lb. Starting the thing up would be awful when you consider the problems RR had with the Avon of 6.5 p.r. The pressure ratio itself means that aluminium is out so the compressor would have to be made from steel or inconel - for a weight of 1543lb?

Offline amsci99

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2008, 04:28:42 am »
It is doubtful the L-1000 turbojet ever worked and the stats convince me that it couldn't have ever worked. Theres more chance of Griffith's CR.1/2 32 (IIRC) spool double reverse flow turbofan working.

red admiral,

Never heard of the Griffith, other than Metreo-Vickers. Could you tell us more?

Offline red admiral

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2008, 10:24:57 am »
Never heard of the Griffith, other than Metreo-Vickers. Could you tell us more?

I thought I had a picture but I can't find it unfortunately. If you have Jet Aircraft Engines by Bill Gunston, its in there. The scheme is difficult to explain without a pictures but lets try;

There area bunch of individual compressor stages connect to a central shaft, outside of the compressor stage and directly connected to it is the turbine stage. Every compressor stage is driven by its own turbine stage. The air flows through the compressor along the axis and into the combustor where it is turned through 180 and exits through the periphery driving the turbine stages.

The RR Historical Society at Derby has the original, which they actually managed to get running in 1942 or 43.

Offline KJ_Lesnick

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2008, 06:12:28 pm »
How did they get 5,000 lbs of power out of 1,543 lbs of weight with early-1940's era technology?

KJ Lesnick

Offline amsci99

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2008, 11:58:16 pm »
Never heard of the Griffith, other than Metreo-Vickers. Could you tell us more?

I thought I had a picture but I can't find it unfortunately. If you have Jet Aircraft Engines by Bill Gunston, its in there. The scheme is difficult to explain without a pictures but lets try;

There area bunch of individual compressor stages connect to a central shaft, outside of the compressor stage and directly connected to it is the turbine stage. Every compressor stage is driven by its own turbine stage. The air flows through the compressor along the axis and into the combustor where it is turned through 180 and exits through the periphery driving the turbine stages.

The RR Historical Society at Derby has the original, which they actually managed to get running in 1942 or 43.

Information on Griffith's CR.1/2 32 is suprisingly hard to find unlike the Metropolitan-Vickers F.1 & F.2 axial flow turbines. Are we referring to Griffith's work on 'contraflow' jet engines when he was at the RAE and before Metropolitan Vickers took over the project?

Offline AF

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Offline FarSight

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Lockheed L-1000
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2008, 05:21:54 am »
How did they get 5,000 lbs of power out of 1,543 lbs of weight with early-1940's era technology?

KJ Lesnick

I think they never did. There seems to have been at least three different versions of this engine and only one (last design) was completed after the war by Menasco.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_J37

Wikipedia also mentions that Wright XT35 turboprop was based on L-1000/J37.

Offline KJ_Lesnick

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2008, 04:19:41 pm »
Why would it use a clutching mechanism, did it have any weight reduction benefits on that particular design?  Is that why the rear of the engine was so small (small turbines, through gearing driving a large compressor)?

The T-35 which it evolved into, did that evolve into the T-45 which ultimately evolved into the J-57? 


-Kendra



Offline KJ_Lesnick

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 03:13:10 pm »
Does anybody know if the T-35 and T-45 were related to each other, or if one evolved into the other?

KJ

Offline flateric

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2008, 11:40:45 am »
Original Lockheed's cutaway of L-133 ca.1941
Lockheed Horizons, Issue 8
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Online Orionblamblam

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2008, 01:41:57 pm »
I am compelled by Federal Law to point out that issue V1N4 of Aerospace Projects Review has a nice big fat article on the L-133 design...

http://www.up-ship.com/eAPR/ev1n4.htm



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Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2008, 01:55:18 pm »
I am compelled to add eAPR is criminally cheap, and should be mandatory for all members.

So there.

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Online Orionblamblam

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Re: Lockheed L-133 A & B
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2008, 02:03:42 pm »
I am compelled to add eAPR is criminally cheap,

Anbd soon to get cheaper. And more expensive. Figure THAT one out....
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And so the endless circle of life comes to an end, meaningless and grim. Why did they live, and why did they die? No reason. Two hundred million years of evolution snuffed out, for in the end Nature is horrific and teaches us nothing