What new materials are there?

GruntFox

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How does it behave against repeated hits? This kind of material can see a drastic decrease in their ballistic property after the first impact.
Funny thing is, this is just the v0.1 version. Something that some people threw together to see if it works and oh boy does it work. Remember, modern ceramic inserts only work once (or, at best, twice) anyway.

Remember, everyone thought Battletech armor was impossible, once upon a time, and it looks like it isn't impossible now with this.

Remember, Battletech armor is fluffed to be a sandwich of perfect-crystal steel, Cubic Boron Nitride ceramic, what sounds suspiciously like titanium foam, and a backplate with what sounds like a CNT weave woven throughout the composite. There is a metal foam that is great against neutrons, surprisingly enough (read up on High-Z Steel Metal Foams, basically balls of tungsten in the air pockets of a steel foam).
 

drejr

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Funny thing is, this is just the v0.1 version. Something that some people threw together to see if it works and oh boy does it work. Remember, modern ceramic inserts only work once (or, at best, twice) anyway.

Remember, everyone thought Battletech armor was impossible, once upon a time

Yes, I'm sure the dozens of people who've pondered BattleTech armor thought it was impossible. As written it's pretty nonsensical.

Composite metal foams are older than BattleTech, and Afsaneh Rabiei herself has been working on them for at least 15 years, so I'm not sure this is something "some people threw together to see if it works."
 
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GruntFox

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Funny thing is, this is just the v0.1 version. Something that some people threw together to see if it works and oh boy does it work. Remember, modern ceramic inserts only work once (or, at best, twice) anyway.

Remember, everyone thought Battletech armor was impossible, once upon a time

Yes, I'm sure the dozens of people who've pondered BattleTech armor thought it was impossible. As written it's pretty nonsensical.

Composite metal foams are older than BattleTech, and Afsaneh Rabiei herself has been working on them for at least 15 years, so I'm not sure this is something "some people threw together to see if it works."
Battletech started out in the 1980s, mind you, well before the idea of metal foams became a thing. Metal foams, as far as I can tell, are fairly recent in terms of discovery.

Now we're seeing something right out of the books working similarly to how it was described, which has some major implications on material science.
 

drejr

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The idea of metal foams "became a thing" in the 1920s, and they were produced at scale starting in the 1950s.

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Syntactic (or composite) metal foams like in the video were experimented with in the early 1980s. Dr. Rabiei has certainly made some innovations, but it's hardly a super-material. As armor her foam has an MER of about 1.5, similar to titanium or AR500 and about half that of a typical ceramic plate, so it's not going to revolutionize personal armor. It may be good for certain types of vehicle armor, but it has low compressive strength so it would be a remarkably bad choice for a giant robot skeleton.

Endosteel doesn't make much sense and generic BattleTech armor seems to be a garbled futuristic hodgepodge of metal matrix composites and honeycomb sandwiches, both of which were well-known at the time.

Note that saying something is stronger or better than steel is fairly meaningless since there are thousands of steels out there. For example this metal foam is better at stopping bullets than RHA, but equal to or worse than contemporary ballistic steels depending on the threat.
 
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publiusr

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I remember a styrofoam looking metal I got some thought to insert in steel tubing. There is wood like metal…from phys.org and an article on a new “shock absorber”…now don’t think tube. Think of something that can break but be reset . AM III carbon looks good IIRC

I wonder if people put car type shocks as part of ship frames to deal with wave action and preserve hull life by being a mechanical fuse box as it were.
 

Hobbes

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I don't think that would help. The hull itself is subjected to bending and torsion stresses. To relieve those, you'd have to divide the hull into sections and have flexible links between them.
 

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Maine’s ban on ‘forever chemicals’ marks a big win for some scientists


”Last month, a group of scientists scored an unexpected win in chemical regulation: The state of Maine became the world’s first jurisdiction to ban the sale of products containing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). The controversial chemicals are common in consumer goods such as nonstick cookware. By 2030, Maine will forbid selling products that use PFASs unless regulators determine their use is “currently unavoidable.”
 

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