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Vertical launch Sea Dart

PMN1

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Sea Dart is stored vertically on the Type 42's as it was on the Type 82 in rotating drums (presumably 11 Sea Dart per drum on the Type 42 if the figures on magazine capacity are correct).

Does anyone know why when they had the missle in the 'correct' orientation it was decided to throw that away and use a trainalble launcher?

What was there to stop the RN using the rotating drum as a VLS similar to the Soviet SA-N-9 with the rotating drum firing out of a single apeture rather than feeding them to the trainable launcher or even making the whole drum a VLS equivalent to the Mk41 or Sylver but in service far sooner than any of these.
 

JohnR

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I believe that the choice of launcher was more to do with the technology of the time. The missile technology of the time limited the missiles ability to "tip" and enter the guidance waves of the FC radar, in the same way as thrust vector control allows missile such as the later versions of SM2 and Sea Wolf. The American Mk11 & 13 launchers operate in the same way as GWS30. Also Russian/Soviet missiles of the same era as SD SAN 1 & 3 use the same method and the SAN 4 actually lowered the entire launcher into the magazine to reload.

It was therefore necessary to point the missile in the general direction of the target.

Also the design of the missiles magazine for Sea Dart would not allow the arrangement suggested. The actual magazine is two deck down, the area immediately below the launcher is an intermediate stage where the booster has its fins connected and the missile is warmed up. Remember that Sea Dart was a Valve/Vacuum Tube technology missile.

Also IIRC at least some if not all Russia/Soviet VLS missiles are "cold" launched. That is they are ejected from their launch tube under pressure and the missile motor only ignites when the missile has cleared the tube. This allowed for the revolver type launcher, rather than the fixed launchers as used in the west, which require exhuast arrangement for the missiles.
 

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