• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

U.S.S. America (LHA-6)

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
818
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
"SNA 2014: Heat From F-35, MV-22 Continue to Plague Big Deck Amphibs"
by Carlo Muñoz
Published: January 15, 2014 5:39 PM

Source:
http://news.usni.org/2014/01/15/sna-2014-heat-f-35-mv-22-continue-plague-big-deck-amphibs

The Navy is continuing to wrestle with landing deck issues aboard its amphibious ships, tied to flight operations with the F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and MV-22 Osprey.

Naval Sea Systems Command have drafted a plan to cope with the problem, using a combination of limited operations and deck modifications to allow the JSF and Osprey to fly off the service’s large deck amphibious warships.

Program leaders are working through 14 different ship modifications aboard the USS America (LHA-6), the first ship in the Navy’s new class of large-deck amphibs, designed to preserve the warship’s landing deck, Capt. Chris Mercer, head of Navy’s amphibious warfare shop, said Tuesday.

Along with those modifications, Navy leaders are also limiting the number of flight operations being conducted off of America, as part of deck preservation plan, Mercer said during a briefing at the Surface Navy Association’s annual symposium in Crystal City, Va.

But Mercer did note the strategy in place for the America will not be necessary for the next two of the LHAs in the class.

USS Tripoli (LHA-7) and the yet-unnamed LHA-8, “will be able to carry out “complete unrestricted operations” with the F-35 and MV-22, Mercer said.

The B variant of the F-35 is a short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft that produces much more heat when it lands and takes off than the current AV-8B Harrier fighters currently flown off of big decks. Likewise, the exhaust heat from the nacelles of the Osprey has damaged flight decks in the past.

Both warships will be able to handle the deck heat issues, based on the lessons learned from the strategy in place aboard the America, Mercer said.

Deck damage issues related to jet engine downwash from the Osprey and F-35 have long plagued the Navy’s efforts to get those aircraft aboard the amphib fleet.

That said, Navy leaders “fully understand . . . the stresses and failures that the flight deck can accept,” Mercer said.

But when pressed as to why service officials have yet to come up with an answer for the deck heat issue, he said program officials were still struggling with finding a “cost-effective solution” to the problem.

However, Mercer was adamant the operational restrictions aboard America would not affect the combat effectiveness of the ship, given its mission.

The caps “are not going to be a problem” since the primary mission for the Navy’s amphibs was quick assault operations, not sustained warfare missions carried out by the service’s aircraft carriers,” Mercer said.

Since the LHA is not designed to support a sustained air campaign, the deck modifications and operational caps will not affect deck reliability aboard the America“as long as we spread [combat sorties] out,” he said.
 

LowObservable

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2006
Messages
2,210
Reaction score
172
It is a real surprise that they should have problems with USS America. Laid down in July 2009, after the F-35B had flown.
 

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
818
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Published on Nov 13, 2013

The amphibious assault ship America (LHA 6), built by Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, MS, sails the Gulf of Mexico on builder's sea trials, Nov. 7-9, 2013.

http://youtu.be/WKDyvjek0BY
 

MrT

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Nov 28, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
So they've built a class of really good looking powerful ships that unfortunately can't embark most of the proposed air component? Sounds interesting. Well I suppose they can at least throw CH53, Huey's and Cobras off them?
 

F-14D

I really did change my personal text
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2007
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
170
The solution that I've heard of for the Osprey has been in place for a while. If the engines have to be run for an extended period prior to launch, they just change the tilt angle of the engines every so often.
 

helmutkohl

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Nov 29, 2010
Messages
550
Reaction score
753
A random question.
a lot of these LHDs the USMC operates, will operate or already operate STOVL aircraft, namely the harrier or F-35.
Was there no interest in adding ski-jumps to them? like say on the Canberra or Juan Carlos which are also LHDs with ski jumps?
 

TomS

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
4,686
Reaction score
1,895
A random question.
a lot of these LHDs the USMC operates, will operate or already operate STOVL aircraft, namely the harrier or F-35.
Was there no interest in adding ski-jumps to them? like say on the Canberra or Juan Carlos which are also LHDs with ski jumps?

1) The USMC does not operate these ships, the USN does.

2) No, there is no serious interest in putting ski-jumps on them. Their primary mission is launching an assault wave of helicopters/tiltrotors, and a ski jump would reduce the number of aircraft that can be spotted for launch.
 

Similar threads

Top