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The Secret Horsepower Race - book by Calum Douglas

steelpillow

So many projects, so little time...
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Unfortunately there are no flightworthy Sabres. I know of only one which is being restored, a painfully slow and delicate process.
 

Pasoleati

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Dagger: AHT=America's Hundred Thousand by Francis H. Dean (Schiffer Publishing).
 

Pasoleati

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Dagger: I did note the subtitle, but the book has a capsule bio of Mikulin at least.
 

Calum Douglas

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Dagger: I did note the subtitle, but the book has a capsule bio of Mikulin at least.
Mikulins inclusion in the form of a brief bio may seem odd given the title, however, given how much the Germans
studied the Mikulin swirl throttle, I judged he had a genuine role in the activites of the western front.

Three years ago I wanted to make the book about all engines from all fronts, but it became clear that to cover Russian
and Japanese engines to the same degree of depth as the German activities (which would be very justified considering
how little is written about them), would have required at least 2 more years and about £20,000 in research costs. I
did actually do a lot of studying on where Russian documents were, and was in quite advanced discusssion with
some Russian researchers about a trip. However, it became apparent that the cost would be prohibative, as
I would have needed to hire a local "fixer", and probably a technical translator, the Russian stuff is also
strewn across many unconnected archives, each of which have arcane access requirements. The main
archive of interest required they recieve a personal letter of recommendation from a senior Russian
civil servant... it all just got incredibly complicated. In Japan, none of the manufacturers answered my letters
requesting archive access, so I had to re-designate the book "western front", and get on with it.
 

Wurger

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Finally I had the time to grasp Calum`s book. I confess I was afraid that it would be more like a british perspective, but the author proved I was wrong, making it an unbiased abridging to this particular subject, just what I would love to see in such a book. I find it a superb work, packed with most useful information. Although much of the information he used is available (IWM Duxford cross my mind), no one before cared to compile this enormous ammount of data, fortunatelly organised in a timely sequence and with an engineers insight. I enjoyed checking the extensive "Notes and References", making this book a departure from everything else I`ve seen on aircraft engines. Kudos!
I am now looking forward to see Calum`s next work on turbochargers and, after that, I urge him to unite and further develop his massive archival stuff and come up with the definitive work on Luftwaffe aircraft piston engines, amassing serial, prototype and projected types. It would be a huge success.
 

Calum Douglas

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Finally I had the time to grasp Calum`s book. I confess I was afraid that it would be more like a british perspective, but the author proved I was wrong, making it an unbiased abridging to this particular subject, just what I would love to see in such a book. I find it a superb work, packed with most useful information. Although much of the information he used is available (IWM Duxford cross my mind), no one before cared to compile this enormous ammount of data, fortunatelly organised in a timely sequence and with an engineers insight. I enjoyed checking the extensive "Notes and References", making this book a departure from everything else I`ve seen on aircraft engines. Kudos!
I am now looking forward to see Calum`s next work on turbochargers and, after that, I urge him to unite and further develop his massive archival stuff and come up with the definitive work on Luftwaffe aircraft piston engines, amassing serial, prototype and projected types. It would be a huge success.

Thanks, I put in a lot of effort to trying to show that it wasnt about "British this... or Germans that..." but about how you manage engineers and resource them properly - and what goes wrong when those things dont work. Of course the culture of the nationalities do have some impact on how the try to work, but I think ultimately its about different groups of broadly-equally capable people in very different circumstances trying to do the same thing with different problems.

I was very worried that British would be angry with me for saying I thought it was a huge mistake to use carburettors and for other comments, or Germans upset with me for saying their engines were unreliable, and have angry americans after me for saying they didnt get things like controls right. I`m glad that (so far) people seem to be getting the argument that its not about countries, its about engineers under different circumstances.

I`m pleased you found the reference section useful, it was a gigantic effort to organize that during the writing process, and also the editing process.
 

Calum Douglas

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Finally I had the time to grasp Calum`s book. I confess I was afraid that it would be more like a british perspective, but the author proved I was wrong, making it an unbiased abridging to this particular subject, just what I would love to see in such a book. I find it a superb work, packed with most useful information. Although much of the information he used is available (IWM Duxford cross my mind), no one before cared to compile this enormous ammount of data, fortunatelly organised in a timely sequence and with an engineers insight. I enjoyed checking the extensive "Notes and References", making this book a departure from everything else I`ve seen on aircraft engines. Kudos!
I am now looking forward to see Calum`s next work on turbochargers and, after that, I urge him to unite and further develop his massive archival stuff and come up with the definitive work on Luftwaffe aircraft piston engines, amassing serial, prototype and projected types. It would be a huge success.

Sorry I forgot to fully answer your question. Until the world rights-itelf again I dont think I`ll be able to write anything much as all the archives are shut. I am also not much of an expert on serial numbers and so on. However, I note your interest and will consider it in future. I need to spend another 2months in Germany to complete my activities there, at present this is not possible.
 

Wurger

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Although I am not an engineer, only an History teacher with a penchant towards engines, I would be more than happy to help pointing some blurred aspects regarding obscure German aircraft engine programs from Bramo, liquid cooled BMW's, KHD, Sachsenbergh, Auto-union, M. A. N.or KHD, as well as sources. I guess you will cover all German efforts in turbochargers in your upcoming book. BTW, do you confirm having those reports on Rheinmetall's Turbocharger? This is only mentioned in "Flugmotoren...", stating nothing else is known about it.
 

Calum Douglas

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Although I am not an engineer, only an History teacher with a penchant towards engines, I would be more than happy to help pointing some blurred aspects regarding obscure German aircraft engine programs from Bramo, liquid cooled BMW's, KHD, Sachsenbergh, Auto-union, M. A. N.or KHD, as well as sources. I guess you will cover all German efforts in turbochargers in your upcoming book. BTW, do you confirm having those reports on Rheinmetall's Turbocharger? This is only mentioned in "Flugmotoren...", stating nothing else is known about it.

I have a tiny amount on the Rheinmetall stuff, to be honest my tactic there if I were to write something else would be to approach Rheinemetall-AG and inspect their archives. Being defence, this would be, I would say, most unlikely to be possible... but you never know (also I always wanted to see how main battle tank guns are machined...haha). Also, perhaps having one book "out" already might make future research applications in difficult areas easier.


Please be aware that the 2nd book isnt really about German turbochargers, althought some of the preview material I have made available gives that impression (my fault). I will have one chapter on German turbochargers, but it is an academic engineering textbook, it has a lot of mathematics, and only a small proportion of historical information. Its for engineers really. If you bought it I would say you might only find 15% of it useful. However, since it is a translation of Prof. Dr-Ing Kollmann's writings, a few people might I suppose consider it interesting just to read what he wrote.

I think the book you are wishing for, requires me to write a new one (i.e. a 3rd one)
 

Wurger

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Although I am not an engineer, only an History teacher with a penchant towards engines, I would be more than happy to help pointing some blurred aspects regarding obscure German aircraft engine programs from Bramo, liquid cooled BMW's, KHD, Sachsenbergh, Auto-union, M. A. N.or KHD, as well as sources. I guess you will cover all German efforts in turbochargers in your upcoming book. BTW, do you confirm having those reports on Rheinmetall's Turbocharger? This is only mentioned in "Flugmotoren...", stating nothing else is known about it.

I have a tiny amount on the Rheinmetall stuff, to be honest my tactic there if I were to write something else would be to approach Rheinemetall-AG and inspect their archives. Being defence, this would be, I would say, most unlikely to be possible... but you never know (also I always wanted to see how main battle tank guns are machined...haha). Also, perhaps having one book "out" already might make future research applications in difficult areas easier.


Please be aware that the 2nd book isnt really about German turbochargers, althought some of the preview material I have made available gives that impression (my fault). I will have one chapter on German turbochargers, but it is an academic engineering textbook, it has a lot of mathematics, and only a small proportion of historical information. Its for engineers really. If you bought it I would say you might only find 15% of it useful. However, since it is a translation of Prof. Dr-Ing Kollmann's writings, a few people might I suppose consider it interesting just to read what he wrote.

I think the book you are wishing for, requires me to write a new one (i.e. a 3rd one)
Good luck on Rheinmetall`s archive, they do not have much to show on weapons development, and it was their most important department. I do not know more on this, but Dr. Leitzbach should help you.
On your upcoming book, do you intend to include photos? That would do the trick on me!
About your 3rd book, an hypothetical "Luftwaffe Piston Aircraft Engines 1933-1945", I take that Mortons would be more than happy to support you on this. Dan, what do you think?
 

Foo Fighter

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"I think the book you are wishing for, requires me to write a new one (i.e. a 3rd one)".

Sounds luvvly jubbly, myself. I suppose it would depend on the numbers involved but partial crowd funding might be an additional revenue stream/river.
 
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