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Tempest - UK Future fighter programme

Flyaway

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Seeing that reminds me Is the Tempest meant to use Fluidic Thrust Vectoring as the Taranis was developing?
 

Ejajjs

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BAE Systems has revealed images of the UK’s Tempest future combat aircraft undergoing windtunnel testing at its Warton site in Lancashire earlier this year.


BAE identifies the Tempest platform’s battery, power and energy management characteristics as key to supporting the use of future technologies such as laser directed-energy weapons. “There’s a huge requirement to dissipate heat”, the company notes, describing onboard power requirements as “comparable to a Boeing 787”.

Source:flightglobal
 

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stealthflanker

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I'm curious on what they had in mind for Laser.

250 KW of power with 20 cm of "laser head" would allow engagement of aircraft target ("hardness" of about :25 KJ/sqcm) at 5 km for 10 seconds of engagement time. It would require about 625 KW or about 937.5 Hp shaft power from the engine, and generator capacity of 781.25 KVA. If 90% of the heat have to be dissipated one could easily look on requirement of at least 560 KW of cooling capacity.
 

Flyaway

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Because of how much this project will likely cost how many more international partners at a minimum does the U.K. need to sign up to make it more likely to progress to reality?
 

flateric

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and even bigger
 

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Reaction Engines Ltd and Rolls-Royce plc today announced a new strategic partnership agreement to develop high-speed aircraft propulsion systems and explore applications for Reaction Engines’ thermal management technology within civil and defence aerospace gas turbine engines and hybrid-electric systems.

“This strategic partnership is about developing market ready applications for Reaction Engines’ technology in next generation engines and is a significant step forward for our technology commercialisation plans,” said Mark Thomas, Chief Executive of Reaction Engines. Our proprietary heat exchanger technology delivers incredible heat transfer capabilities at extremely low weight and a compact size. We look forward to expanding our international collaboration with Rolls-Royce, a global leader in power systems, to bring to market a range of applications that will transform the performance and efficiency of aircraft engines, enable high speed – supersonic and hypersonic – flight and support the drive towards more sustainable aviation through innovative new technologies.”
twitter_flyerv1.jpg 6a00d8341c4fbe53ef0240a494c367200b-550wi.jpg
 

red admiral

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Because of how much this project will likely cost how many more international partners at a minimum does the U.K. need to sign up to make it more likely to progress to reality?

Why does adding more partners necessarily make it cost less?
 

zen

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I don't read Japanese, can we have translation please?
 

kaiserd

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Because of how much this project will likely cost how many more international partners at a minimum does the U.K. need to sign up to make it more likely to progress to reality?

Why does adding more partners necessarily make it cost less?
It doesn’t necessarily but probably makes such a programme more affordable and realistically achievable for a country like the UK.
Sharing of development costs and greater economies of scale upfront and throughout the service life; not all are necessarily fully realised but they and political costs (and financial penalties) also make it less attractive for one particular government to bail on/ cancel such a project.
Notable in this context that France and Dassault have chosen not to continue on the “national” program track but are partnering with Airbus and Germany. While other countries are actively forgetting lessons they learned decades ago....
 

Flyaway

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In addition to detection, the Tempest fighter will likely also be able to use its radar for electronic attack. Once a mission reserved for special mission aircraft, thanks to AESA radars, modern fighters can often perform their own electronic attack (EA) missions.

The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, for example, can already perform electronic attack missions with its radar, including “false targets, network attack, advanced jamming, and algorithm-packed data streams.” Tempest will likely be able to perform even more sophisticated EA missions with an even more powerful radar system.

 

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[...] while the French and German governments have already launched the demonstrator phase of their FCAS and aim to begin flight tests in 2026.


By contrast, Team Tempest is in no rush to fly a demonstrator, or even to lock down the design. “The sooner you lock down the design, the sooner it’s obsolete,” observed Andrew Kennedy, Strategic Campaigns Director for BAE Systems Air.

“Traditionally, the capabilities we could bring to the battlespace were restricted at an early stage by the decisions made in designing a platform,” explained Bancroft. “An aircraft would be designed and built, and then companies like Leonardo would work to equip it with useful technology. If you wanted a specific capability, but it wouldn't fit on the aircraft, then straight away you've got a costly and time-consuming problem to solve. We, as Team Tempest have recognized that this model is no longer fit for purpose.”

Instead, Team Tempest initially aims to concentrate on the technologies and capabilities required, compressing platform development by making extensive and unparalleled use of model-based systems engineering and design.
 

kaiserd

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Hood

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No surprises there.
But then 2035 or 2040 is a long ways off. Back in 2005 or 2000 could we have predicted what the situation in 2020 would be like?
All it takes is for Sweden or Italy to jump ship and Tempest is more or less dead. But at this point convergence seems ever more likely the more resources that get pumped in.
Its not even inconceivable that BAE Systems would do what it did to its civilian aircraft programmes and shut up shop and get as far away from airframes as it can once Typhoon production is over if the financial situation gets bleak. Building a third-share of two hundred fighters over three decades doesn't sound like a great long-term business plan.
Will Dassault even still be independent from Airbus in 2040?
 

TomcatViP

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Sweden MoD just announced the doubling of their budgets in the future, also mentioning the pressure from Russian fighter jets.
Among all their priorities, this could reflect a willingness to increase their momentum in a joint FCAS endeavor.

Since IADS and far north can only translates in longer range, they might found easily a middle ground with their other partners (UK & Italia).
 
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tequilashooter

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Tempest drives forward as Leonardo unveils new radar sensing technology - Leonardo - Aerospace, Defence and Security (leonardocompany.com)

"The reduced size and weight of Leonardo’s new receiver technology, as well as reduced power requirements, means that it will be possible to integrate the sensor into a multi-function array. This concept, one of a number of innovative ideas being considered for Tempest, could see a number of multi-purpose sensors spread around the aircraft, simultaneously sensing and tracking enemy aircraft, incoming missiles and other threats from all directions, while being fully integrated with a forward-facing radar."

Basically every news report is telling me that they are going for a all awareness AESA kind of design for the aircraft. Any news about the aircraft having infrared or UV missile warning sensors?
 

steelpillow

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Any news about the aircraft having infrared or UV missile warning sensors?

Apologies for my ancient knowledge base, but what possible value would IR or UV have as a warning sensor? Do missiles use these ranges for target tracking these days, or something?
 

Trident

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Both detect & track the missile not by seeker emissions but (primarily) propulsion signature.

UV: low probability of false alarm, as (barring the sun) there aren't many sources of UV radiation other than missile exhaust plumes around. Can't track missiles after motor burn-out however, and are hence more aptly classed as MLDs ( Missile Launch Detectors).

IR: Potentially more susceptible to false triggers by other thermal sources, but can continue to track missiles after burn-out by aerodynamic heating of the airframe - i.e. proper MAWS (Missile Approach Warning Sensors).

Of course, a dual band system might combine the advantages of both.
 

TomcatViP

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And here we go (I am deeply sorry that this slipped through our net until now) :
The Italian Minister of Defense Lorenzo Guerini, the British Secretary of State for Defence Ben Wallace and the Swedish Minister for Defence Peter Hultkvist signed a trilateral Future Combat Air System Cooperation Memorandum of Understanding on Dec. 21, 2020. The news was disclosed by the Italian Government only few days ago.

 

FighterJock

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And here we go (I am deeply sorry that this slipped through our net until now) :
The Italian Minister of Defense Lorenzo Guerini, the British Secretary of State for Defence Ben Wallace and the Swedish Minister for Defence Peter Hultkvist signed a trilateral Future Combat Air System Cooperation Memorandum of Understanding on Dec. 21, 2020. The news was disclosed by the Italian Government only few days ago.


Good news for Team Tempest.
 

steelpillow

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"machine learning used to combine and process the overall situational awareness picture"

Oh, dear:

"So why did it fly into the side of a truck?"
"It couldn't tell the white surface from the sky, Ma'am."
"And who did we buy the machine-learning software from?"
"Tesla."
"Oh, I thought it was Uber."
"No, that was the previous contractor, when it ran the batsman down on the aircraft carrier because it didn't recognise the dark human behind the bright bats."
"OK let's change the subject. Why are all the Russian and Chinese jets sporting arbitrary patches of gaffer tape?"
"Because it pulls the pixel-changes which create spurious recognition events by our AI. LIke pasting a sheet of paper on the road to make a self-driving car think it's a road marking and change lanes."
"And the high IFF (Identification Friend or Foe - Ed.) failure rate?"
"The IFF ML subsystem was sourced overseas and turns out to have been trained on the wrong ethnic groups, Ma'am."
"So, what do you suggest as the way forward, young man?"
"What we need right now is a secondary situational awareness system reporting on the primary situational awareness systems!" o_O

Not suggesting these particular features of ML will still be there, but their more sophisticated brethren surely will.
 
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starviking

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"machine learning used to combine and process the overall situational awareness picture"

Oh, dear:

"So why did it fly into the side of a truck?"
"It couldn't tell the white surface from the sky, Ma'am."
"And who did we buy the machine-learning software from?"
"Tesla."
"Oh, I thought it was Uber"
"No, that was the previous contractor, when it ran the batsman down on the aircraft carrier because it didn't recognise the dark human behind the bright bats."
"OK let's change the subject. Why are all the Russian and Chinese jets wearing arbitrary strips of gaffer tape?"
"Because it pulls the pixel-changes which create spurious recognition events by our AI. LIke pasting a sheet of paper on the road to make a self-driving car think it's a road marking and change lanes."
"Got it! So what we need is a secondary situational awareness system reporting on the primary situational awareness systems!" o_O

Not suggesting these particular features of ML will still be there, but their more sophisticated brethren surely will.

Reminds me of a story on machine learning in Physics World. Researchers used pictures of wolves from the net to teach the program to find wolves. It failed because many pictures of wolves occur with snowy backgrounds... so the program was actually trained to look for snow.
 

galgot

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"machine learning used to combine and process the overall situational awareness picture"

Oh, dear:

"So why did it fly into the side of a truck?"
"It couldn't tell the white surface from the sky, Ma'am."
"And who did we buy the machine-learning software from?"
"Tesla."
"Oh, I thought it was Uber"
"No, that was the previous contractor, when it ran the batsman down on the aircraft carrier because it didn't recognise the dark human behind the bright bats."
"OK let's change the subject. Why are all the Russian and Chinese jets wearing arbitrary strips of gaffer tape?"
"Because it pulls the pixel-changes which create spurious recognition events by our AI. LIke pasting a sheet of paper on the road to make a self-driving car think it's a road marking and change lanes."
"Got it! So what we need is a secondary situational awareness system reporting on the primary situational awareness systems!" o_O

Not suggesting these particular features of ML will still be there, but their more sophisticated brethren surely will.
Stealth automatic terrain following software by Tesla ?

ideesnoires.jpg
Translation :" To escape the radars, this one attacks by flying so low that we had to equip it with turn signals to turn at crossroads ... better: he stops at red lights and does not pretend anything. ... electronically ..."
 

Forest Green

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There's a story about an AI that was tasked with landing a plane with the minimum force on a simulator. It nose-dived the plane into the ground and the resulting force was so large that it overflowed the register in the computer where the force value was stored causing it to default to a zero. The AI felt this was a success.
 

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