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Soviet Naval SAM Projects

Hood

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Some time ago I posted some material on abortive Soviet nuclear cruisers; the Project 63, 81 and 1126 designs which never left the drawing boards owing to the abandonment of the large ship under Khrushchev.

I've been going back over what information I have and I want to see if anyone here has any more information on the proposed long-range SAM systems that were to be developed for these ships but cancelled in 1961.

One proposal for Project 63 is armed with two twin SM-68 or SM-69 twin launchers for the M-3 system firing the V-800 missile. Normal missile load for this massive design was to be 10 missiles per launcher. I believe the missile probably would have been command guided like the M-1 (SA-N-1) and M-2 (SA-N-2) systems with the ability to guide 2 or 3 missiles at the same target. Guidance would to be provided by two 'Fregat' fire control directors and the system's range was to be approximately 55 kilometres. As for the missile itself it was about 20m long and probably armed with a blast-fragmentation warhead. See below for a scanned picture.

Another competing weapon system was the M-31 system firing a modified 2K11'Krug' missile, again using two twin launchers (type unknown but modified SM-68 or -69 launchers seem likely for the size of the missile). The missile, like its ground counterpart, would be a beam rider for mid-course control with semi-active radar homing in the terminal phase. The liquid-fuelled ramjet with four strap-on wrap-around solid-fuel boosters probably wouldn't be altered but I'd expect some changes to the fins to allow for vertical relaoding and easier stowage below decks and to better fit a twin-rail launcher. It would probably share the same 150 kilogram blast-fragmentation warhead and have a range of 50 kilometres. Given the Krug-A (the second main production variant of this missile) had much better low-altitude performance than that expected of M-3 this might have been the better weapon and has the better guidance system. As was the V-800, this is a bulky missile and 10 rounds per launcher is probably a reasonable expected load. One fire control radar could guide two missiles at the same target but some designs have four radars and four rails which enables a much more flexible system.
Either of these long-range missiles would be supported by two M-11 'Shtorm' systems using the V-611 missile (SA-N-3 'Goblet').
 

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Abingdon

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The Fakel history from 2003 by Vladimir Korovin (Rakety Fakela) had a water-color illustration of the missile on its launcher, here below. Not a lot of detail on the system as presumably Altair or one of the other bureaus was assigned to that task. I don't think Altair has ever published a bureau history.
 

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robunos

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interesting that the boosters are wrapped around the forward end of the missile, Seaslug style...

cheers,
Robin.
 

JohnR

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How would the missile have been stored? With the apparent positioning of the boosters I would guess it would have to be stored inverted - a la SAN4.

Regards
 

Abingdon

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The big Shirokorad book on Soviet missiles and his Tekhnika i Vooruzhenie special on Soviet naval missiles state that the launcher was designated as SM-68 and developed by TsKB-34. The Project 63 and 64 warships were supposed to be fit with 2 launch systems, 20 V-800 missiles and 2 Fregat fire control systems; Project 81 was supposed to have 40 V-800 missiles. There are no descriptions of the missile stowage and no illustrations. The Nevskiy Bastion booklet on the S-300 system provides rough cross-sections of the ships, but the detail is not especially good so it's not possible to figure out the stowage. This website has those drawings along with some of the sketches of other early naval SAMs:

http://pvo.guns.ru/naval/nb_navy.htm
 

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