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Soviet Aircraft Manteinance philosophy

Pit

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On Keymags forum, MrDetonator posted a very interesting series of messages about this topic, can you my friend post some of your basic ideas here?

I think this is an interesting topic, and I have found this on Easy Tartar's analysis of MiG-29

MiG-29 Maintenance Servicing:

The MiG-29 has two 3000 psi hydraulic systems that back each other up as in the MiG-23, but no third system as in Western aircraft. There seems to be a real sacrifice in survivability doing things this way, but it is consistent with the Russian mentality towards aircraft life during war.

Aircraft and Engine "CHECK CYCLES" are categorized by "HOUR-LEVEL" Checks, however the engines get scheduled monthly calendar checks and inspections regardless. Remember, in the Indian Air Force, 74% (139) of the 188 failed prematurely before the 300 hour cycle level. Of those that failed, 40% (56) did not achieve half the predicted 300 hour cycle life. Hence the Indian maintenance cycle was dropped to 50 hours.

Operational maintenance is categorized according to:
1. pre flight checks
2. through flight checks
3. post flight checks

Aircraft and Engine "Checks" are organized according to "Hour-Level" Inspections and Actions. Engines however, get monthly calendar inspections, whether they need them or not.

1. Every 60 days there is an inspection cycle that is done on the aircraft without test equipment but utilizing the on-board built in test (BIT) system and a visual inspection of all systems. The BIT check takes 1/2 a man day, or four man hours.

2. The 100 HOUR LEVEL CHECK
- at 45 min per sortie, i.e., after 133 flights or every two months
- takes 5-6 days
- BIT check plus everything short of component removal
- Engine uses tester unit run against special chart

3. The 200 HOUR LEVEL CHECK
- Equipment removal and failure replacements
- same volume of items on 100 Hr Check for engine
- "other" maintenance not explained
- engine oil samples are taken every 100 & 150 hours

4. The 300 HOUR LEVEL CHECK
- engine-only checks
- Intermediate level (JEIM) inspection
- TBO not yet determined

5. The 400 HOUR LEVEL CHECK
- Includes all systems

Ground Test Equipment: Squadron Breakout for 20 Aircraft

Test Equipment
(6) Mk-912 Tester Units for onboard equipment checks at the 100 Hour Level
(1) Engine Tester Unit
(1) INS Tester Unit
(2) Sighting Systems Tester Units
(1) Armaments Systems Tester Unit
(1) Manual Tester unit for miscellaneous equipment
(1 ) BIT check adapters
Ground Support Equipment
(1) Power supply
(1) Hydraulic stand
(1) Vehicle with oxygen bottles
(1) Vehicles with air bottles
(1) Pressurization/air conditioning unit
(1) R27 missile Tester unit
(1) R60 missile Tester unit
(1) R73 missile Testerunit
(1) Rockets and Bomb Tester Unit
(1) Gun system Tester

No support requirements or maintenance tasks were mentioned for the Chaff and Flare dispensers that are located on the above wing structure extending forward from the vertical tails. There are weather guards that crew on to the dispensers and must be removed before flight.


Source -
http://www.saunalahti.fi/fta/MiG-29-2b.htm

Thanks for any comments!
 

Schorsch

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Is it right that western MILITARY aircraft have 3 hydraulic cycles? I thought that only civil aircraft have three? The survivability need not to be reduced by a reduced number of hydraulic cycles.

Further, which engine exactly did the Indians test? Was it that of the Su-27 or the RD-33 of the MiG-29?
 

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