Rocket Lab Launcher

Michel Van

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looking into concept
it makes sense that they use carbon fibre to build Neutron
Neutron is much smaller as Starship/Superheavy, who build for cheap Steel.
So the construction cost will not be so high.
the Neutron empty mass will be very low, this allow interesting Aerodynamic glide on return.
it's more of a Lifting Body, in contrast of the ballistic returning Falcon 9 stage
This could allow grater cross range glide for return to Launch site compare to a Falcon 9.
 

TomcatViP

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There is one point in their presentation subject to caution: achieving a vertical landing without much ground clearance. As we are able to guess now, judging from their cinematic display, the landing is not realistic without cutting engine power from a certain height (inferior to a dozen meters). I understand that their intend is for absorbing all the shock and accelerations involved with shock absorbers but that doesn't take into account any asymmetry in the landing attitude or wind gusts.

For something that should be refurbished in 24hr, they might get some surprises there.

Also the nose cone petal opening need a cautious design to be perfectly symmetrical and reliable.
 
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sferrin

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There is one point in their presentation subject to caution: achieving a vertical landing without much ground clearance. As we are able to guess now, judging from their cinematic display, the landing is not realistic without cutting engine power from a certain height (inferior to a dozen meters). I understand that their intend is for absorbing all the shock and accelerations involved with shock absorbers but that doesn't take into account any asymmetry in the landing attitude or wing gusts.

For something that should be refurbished in 24hr, they might get some surprises there.

Also the nose cone petal opening need a cautious design to be perfectly symmetrical and reliable.
They wouldn't be opening it until they were in, effectively, no atmosphere. At that point, whether symmetrical or not, it really wouldn't matter.
 

TomcatViP

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Roll and yaw ;) (think at the speed and the effect of a momentum change)
Explosive bolts give you an instantaneous separation where then both objects have their independent momentum conservation law (but for any impacts). Here, it is not the case and every variation involves thrust correction and trajectory alterations.
 
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Grey Havoc

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Flyaway

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Update on the Rocket Lab private mission to Venus. It will be a Venus Life Finder mission:


Second mission for 2026 is already being planned.

 
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Michel Van

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Three interviews in a Week !
What is Peter Beck up too ?
 

Michel Van

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the Company got new logo

FL1IXxNVkAAOl5H
 

Flyaway

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LONG BEACH, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Rocket Lab USA, Inc (Nasdaq: RKLB) (“Rocket Lab”), a leading launch and space systems company, has announced today that during its next Electron launch, a commercial rideshare mission currently scheduled in April 2022, the company will attempt a mid-air helicopter capture of the Electron launch vehicle for the first time.
 

TomS

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Not quite. They got the grab but then dropped it due to "unexpected load characteristics" whatever that means.
 

Flyaway

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Shows that even now you cannot simulate every eventuality over reality.

Rocket Lab declared success in its effort to catch an Electron booster in midair after launch May 2, even though the helicopter had to release the booster moments later.

The Electron rocket lifted off from the company’s Launch Complex 1 in New Zealand at 6:49 p.m. Eastern after a brief hold in the countdown. The rocket’s ascent went as planned, with the kick stage, carrying a payload of 34 smallsats, reaching orbit about 10 minutes later.
 

Flyaway

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A NASA lunar cubesat mission is now scheduled to launch in late May on a Rocket Lab Electron after resolving issues with the rocket’s kick stage.

In a call with reporters after the May 2 launch of an Electron rocket carrying 34 smallsats, Peter Beck, chief executive of Rocket Lab, said that the next Electron mission will be of the Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) cubesat for NASA. He did not give a date for the launch.
Once launched, CAPSTONE will take four months to go into a near-rectilinear halo orbit around the moon, the same orbit NASA plans to use for the lunar Gateway. Its primary mission of testing the stability of the orbit and conducting navigation experiments with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will last six months, followed by an extended or “enhanced” mission of up to 11 months with additional tests.

 

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