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RLM acquisition standards

Bodmas

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i'm kind of curious as to how the (WWII) RLM posted design concepts. What was "standard practice"? i know that a "P - number" was issued; and thence, possibly, a "Designation". However, beyond that, i'm "blind".
Any "Beginner's Guides"?
 

Meteorit

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Well, maybe you have seen this already: http://www.designation-systems.net/non-us/germany.html.

As to the manufacturer's internal designations, there wasn't a standardized system, but the companies were free to designate their projects as they wished. However the majority used the P (Projekt) prefix with exceptions being Arado with E (Entwurf - Design) and Junkers with EF (Entwicklungs Flugzeug - Development Aircraft). With few exceptions an RLM designation was assigned only after it had been decided to actually build a prototype.

Source: Jet Planes of the Third Reich vol.1 by Manfred Griehl, Monogram 1998. (A highly recommended book btw. if you can get it somewhere.)
 

Bodmas

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Thanks Meteorit... i hadn't seen that link before ;D

So, to test my understanding of the links and stuff...

The RLM postulated a specification [eg. "single engined fighter" with dimensions a, powerplant b and performance c], giving it a designation [Company prefix]XX, 108, 109, 209, 309, 409 (for example) etc. Hence, if an example were to be ordered, an "in house" "P-" designation would be issued by the manufacturer (eg. P-1101, 1102, 1103 - relatively arbitrarily)... a bit i'm not clear upon [the main reason for the post]... which after initial design - and (possibly) some [windtunnel] models & testing -would be instantiated in the prototype; XX yyy V-1, V-2, V-3... V-n.
Does that - in a nutshell - sound about right?
Anybody?

Cheers
 

Meteorit

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I'm not sure if I'm interpreting your post correctly, but if I am, yes that sounds about right, however the RLM designation would be assigned after the manufacturer's one (P., EF...) at a point when there already was a concrete design that had been selected for construction (obviously there could be some exceptions).
 

Bodmas

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Thanks for the reply, Meteorit

So, i guess that the reasons for my confusion lies in the differences between the RLM pitching a speculative design versus the manufacturer pitching a design... perhaps?
i was always under the impression that the RLM issued specifications first - rather than the manufacturers (ie. the "other way around")
Sorry, i misunderstood your post the first time around :-[
 

Meteorit

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Don't confuse specification with designation ;)
In reality it could be both the RLM asking for a design or an aircraft company coming up with a proposal. But when RLM asked for designs the program could be called "Bomber B" or "Volksjäger" for example, not 8-123 or He 123 or whatever.
 

Artie Bob

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I think it was a lot more complicated than your comments indicate, just look at the number of projects compared to RLM designations. Arado alone numbers in the hundreds as does B&V, etc. In some instances designs were a response to RLM requirements. Many more designs were probably the results of applying aerodynamic, powerplant, weaponry, structural, and other developments to improve performance and mission capabilities resulting in paper studies. There are still many gaps in the known sequence and to my knowledge none of the primary documents summarizing these assignments (which surely must have existed at one time) have come to light. One last comment, the scope of the RLM was much greater than it’s contemporaries in the USA and GB, it was a combination of NACA, Air Force and Navy procurement, industry planning board plus the airlines and CAA. Much of the financing of the German aircraft industry was received from the government, so the RLM had a considerable oversight in day to day operations. Private ventures were as a result , the exception not the rule. IIRC, there were some company developed designs that ultimately received RLM 8-nummer assignments and ultimately hardware, but these were the exceptions

Best Regards,

Artie Bob
 

Bodmas

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Meteorit said:
Don't confuse specification with designation ;)
In reality it could be both the RLM asking for a design or an aircraft company coming up with a proposal. But when RLM asked for designs the program could be called "Bomber B" or "Volksjäger" for example, not 8-123 or He 123 or whatever.

I'm on to it... this was precisely the reason for my original confusion: Designation v specification...
and the reason for the "Other way round" impression was the Bomber-B & Volksjager programmes. Mind you, i agree with Artie Bob... the whole beaurocracy was hellishly complicated.

Thanks guys. This is proving to be awfully stimulating and enlightening B)

A whole "Economy-sized" Can of Worms maybe?
 

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