• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

Replacing the British Army rifle

TomS

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
3,631
Reaction score
520
Eliminating cookoff is certainly desirable, but this seems like a very heavy and bulky way to do it (they claim to be comparable in weight to conventional cartridges, which even if true is pretty unfortunate as we are moving to lightweight polymer or alloy cases). Polymer case telescoped ammunition (CTA) seems to be similarly cookoff-proof, based on experimental results from LSAT, and is a good deal lighter. Keeping the chamber from heating up in the first place seems like a better bet than throwing away a lot of heated mass every few shots.

Very high ROF is not necessarily desirable, since it means recoil will be quite stout (5 x .243 all at once!), especially without any mechanical action to soak it up. I suppose you could float the whole action and get some really fast burst action as in the G11 but suddenly complexity is creeping back in. I've seen the claim that rapid shots would crack ceramic plates in heavy body armor, but that's asking for an awful lot of repeatability in a rifle where all five barrels are by design not zeroed on the same point. It also means single-shot accuracy at range is anyone's guess, since you may not even know which barrel you're firing, much less where that barrel is zeroed.
 

Kadija_Man

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
2,014
Reaction score
96
As for using Motars, they are held at company or battalion level. What conversation do they need with "higher ups" other than their own battalion or company CO? They are there to used, why not use them. Same for LMG/GPMGs. Infantry sections are meant to be supported. They do not operate alone on a battlefield.
You're talking about how things would work in theory on a general war battlefield. The actual practice of Afghanistan was that for large periods of the conflict, anything that had the potential to cause civilian casualties needed approval up to brigade HQ at least. That included basically any fragmenting warhead other than 40mm grenades. Far, far from ideal for the infantry, but that's the way it was. And the way it might well be again in a future COIN fight.
That is a change of ROEs. The Australian Army was operating in the same environment and only took artillery out of the mix. Mortars remained at battalion level though.
 

Foo Fighter

I came, I saw, I drank some tea (and had a bun).
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
1,261
Reaction score
334
I thought the SLR was OK but if we moved about in the back of a shortie LR, van drivers behind us got in a bit of a tizzy, I suppose gun barrels waving all over the place right under your nose is a guaranteed motion lotion. They should not have been so close in fairness.
 
Top