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Lockheed Martin F-35: News ONLY topic

jeffb

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Something which isn't mentioned with the tech transfer aspects of the F35 is the changes regularly required to client state intellectual property policies. These can be surprisingly onerous and far reaching, especially where F35 parts manufacturing or maintenance is involved.
This is based on what exactly?

Something which isn't mentioned with the tech transfer aspects of the F35 is the changes regularly required to client state intellectual property policies. These can be surprisingly onerous and far reaching, especially where F35 parts manufacturing or maintenance is involved.
This is based on what exactly?
Actually nothing. I'm confusing dual use export controls with IP restrictions. My bad.
 

Acatomic

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When you understand that F-35s can fly anywhere un-impaired in the M.E, a region only limited by access to technology in their weapons acquisition policies, you've to wonder if anyone has a real sense of the awe power yet in the hands of those gifted to get their buy flying.

The F-35 program is not only a weapon, it's a change of era in the military akin to the Renaissance in arts.
Yeah, lets just hope it hits FRP in '21.
 

Bhurki

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When you understand that F-35s can fly anywhere un-impaired in the M.E, a region only limited by access to technology in their weapons acquisition policies, you've to wonder if anyone has a real sense of the awe power yet in the hands of those gifted to get their buy flying.

The F-35 program is not only a weapon, it's a change of era in the military akin to the Renaissance in arts.
Yeah, lets just hope it hits FRP in '21.
Oh, darn.. I guess i jinxed it.
 

TomcatViP

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A change in doctrine that could bear some importance here:
In a statement issued on 29th December, the Swiss military announced the round-the-clock quick-reaction availability of two F-18s for protection of the nation’s airspace.

“From now on, the air police service will be on call 24 hours a day to guarantee the security and the sovereignty over Swiss airspace,” the statement said.

Also noted by the Aviationist:
 

TomcatViP

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Israel MoD declares to be in favor of an immediate acquisition of 20+ F-35:
 
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TomcatViP

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An expert believes this legislation benefits the USAF because it may be able to modify and use these aircraft in situations where using new, operational F-35As would be cost-prohibitive. A retired USAF pilot, who was given anonymity because he is not authorised to speak to reporters, told Janes on 4 January that these situations include exercises and maintenance training.

They also include using the aircraft to experiment with new technologies or to train new test pilots. Using test aircraft in these situations would be much cheaper than using “full-up” F-35As, the retired pilot said.

These original test aircraft are in long-term storage because they are the oldest version of the F-35 and do not resemble the current A-model versions. These test assets have older avionics and test instrumentation, for example, and thus have very limited utility in their current configuration.
 

helmutkohl

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hooray something slightly less boring!

but don't some US Navy F-35s have some color too?
f-35-c-.com__main.jpg
 

archipeppe

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AN/AWW-14(V)

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ISR_F-35I.jpeg


Maariv, a the second largest and trustful newspaper published in Israel, reported that some Israeli F-35I Adirs will participate for the very first time in an international military exercise outside Israel. The Adirs will be flown over from Nevatim air base (Israel) to Italy.

The Heyl Ha'Avir (IAF, Israeli Air Force) said that the aim of the exercise is to enhance cooperation and relations between the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) and the Aeronautica Militare (AMI, Italian Air Force). It is expected that other allies will take part in the exercise too. Together they will conduct flights in an unfamiliar field that examines the ability to deploy stealth aircraft and the required systems.

The IAF stated that despite the coronavirus crisis, they see great importance in continuing international military exercises, and at this stage there is no change in the programmes to implement many maneuvers this year outside Israel.

There has been no confirmation about the exercise from the Italian side yet. If the exercise will take place, Scramble assesses that it will take place from Amendola / Luigi Rovelli air base where the AMI with 32° Stormo / 13° Gruppo is operating the F-35As. The tough security measures required for Lightning and Adir operations are already integrated in the infrastructure of that air base. It is very well possible that Decimomannu air base at the isle of Sardinia will be involved as well, as earlier the IAF participated in combined exercises with the AMI from that location. Israel is currently operating with three Adir squadrons: 116sq "The Southern Lions Squadron", "The Mighty Squadron" and 140sq "The Golden Eagle Squadron". The trio is under command of the Adir Divison.

 

TomcatViP

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UAE deal on inauguration day:
the agreement was signed about an hour before Biden was sworn into office. The document gave the United Arab Emirates the chance to accept the negotiated schedule and configuration of the jets while also making the purchase request official.
[...]
The final in-country delivery date for the F-35 jets could not immediately be confirmed, but the initial proposal sent to UAE said 2027, the people said.

 
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TomcatViP

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The Lockheed Martin-made F-35′s mission capable rate — which describes the percentage of aircraft that can meet at least one of its assigned missions — currently sits at 69 percent, falling short of the military’s longstanding 80 percent goal, said Ellen Lord,
I don't think it's too bad. That number is an above average for many NATO air forces for example.

Regarding the parts that break often, I do think that the change in materials from Aluminum to CFRP might have a play into that with storage and handling tools probably not adapted to parts being more susceptibles to impacts and more bulky (complex shapes). Think also at moisture level that might degrade material on the long term.
 

Arjen

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That's a bit rose-tinted view of the situation.
Those 69% include 33% of the fleet that cannot perform all assigned missions.
The Lockheed Martin-made F-35′s mission capable rate — which describes the percentage of aircraft that can meet at least one of its assigned missions — currently sits at 69 percent
[...]
When looking at fully mission capable aircraft able to perform all of the F-35′s assigned missions, “we’re currently at 36 percent fully mission capable, and we are striving to be at 50 percent for the fleet,” she added.

Lord attributed the low percentage of fully mission capable jets to ongoing issues with the F-35′s canopy and the F135 engine’s power module.
 
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TomcatViP

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Well, stats can be discussed at length but let's not go head-butt on this number.
 
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GTX

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Such articles are meaningless without some context. For instance, if one took the recent GAO report on Mission Capable Rates for Selected Department of Defense Aircraft (GAO-21-101SP) one would see things such as the following chart which shows to a degree how the F-35 compares to other platforms in this context.

GAO Pic.png
Now, this is not to say that the F-35 doesn't have issues. It certainly does though at the same time it is still in the process of entering service so these should be expected. But again, how does that compare against other platforms??
 

marauder2048

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FMC is "all required missions" not "all assigned missions" which gives a hint
as to its origin: the requirements docs.

Which in turn makes FMC of limited operational utility because no
commander has a fighter simultaneously tasked for say CAS and DCA.

And modern mission planning software that will run on laptops can take
fine-grain aircraft configurations and predict mission outcomes.

FMC goals are haphazardly devised and assigned, may not be in ORDs
or maintenance contracts. Example: OSD rescinded the 80% MC
directive for FY20 and beyond which apparently the author of that
article doesn't know about.

FMC reporting dramatically under-predicted GW1 fighter performance and
the operational side within DOD has been trying to move away from it ever since.
 

RavenOne

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The mistake is mine obviously. I should have correctly written starboard to name the side of the damaged engines and pod.
Regarding the damages on port side (hence left and right on the photo), don't forget the massive fuel leak (photo and probably comms - mentioned by the pilot in his mayday call). I won't be surprised if he flew through debris. That could also explain the single prop blade missing on engine #1 as the pod.

damaged-kc-130-png.641803

I saw same airframe Over fortnight earlier here at RAF Mildenhall.

0BB07BAD-38AE-4070-8ACD-ADCAE2BFB6FF.jpeg

As it had gone Tech week or so earlier. Anyhow if you remember my post with my photos of VMFA-211 Wake Island Avengers arriving here at RAF Marham, for their work up on QE carrier well this KC-130J turned up few days later to Marham carrying more support kit etc. It took off and headed to RAF Brize Norton way then went tech and ended up being at Mildenhall for week or so, did s couple of maintenance test flights after be8ng fixed then went back home to Cherry Point

45FF3711-2515-48A8-8357-0C08321F8302.jpeg

I took this when At RAF Lakenheath when it Finally left ..

cheers
 

Bhurki

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Next F-35 Contracts Under Negotiation, Deal Expected by Late September

The contracting strategy is to negotiate a “base year” contract for Lot 15, with “two single-year options (Lots 16 and 17),” a JPO spokeswoman said. While the air vehicles are under negotiation, the “propulsion Lot 15-17 proposal is currently in technical evaluation,” the spokeswoman said. Although Lockheed quotes prices publicly for F-35s with engines included, the government negotiates with the engine maker separately. The Lightning II is powered by Pratt’s F135 turbofan.

The program office expects to conclude both the air vehicle and propulsion talks within fiscal 2021, the spokeswoman said. Lot 15 air vehicles “are planned to be fully funded and awarded in FY’21,” but the Lot 16 and 17 options would be exercised in fiscal year 2022 and 2023, respectively, “when funding becomes available.”
 

TomcatViP

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Amazing picture of an F-35 spotted low over Lebanon (notice the missile rails) :

EslVWhsW8AA8Zg5


 

Arjen

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Available here:
Original link had one ']' too many.
Discussion of several aircraft - Harrier GR.7/9 AV-8B, F/A-18A/C, F-35. The gist of it on the F-35: situational awareness like nothing he experienced before, voice-control not much use, on helmet-mounted display:
The technology of the helmet is great, but I’d take a HUD any day. It all comes down to physics – you can only shrink things so much before they start to become degraded, and HUDs have bigger optics than helmets…currently.

Some trouble with touch screens, I would think not specific to the F-35:
the cockpit is beautiful to look at – nothing analogue, all digital with about 10 actual switches in the cockpit. Notice I say beautiful to look at, not necessarily beautiful to interact with! In theory the all-glass display is great. It’s touchscreen, you can set it up to show pretty much anything you want in any layout you want. Take, for example, a fuel display. You can have it in a large window that shows you everything you could possibly want to know about the aircraft’s fuel system; the contents of each tank, which pumps are operating, fuel temperature, centre of gravity etc. Or you can shrink it into a smaller window that only shows more basic info. Or you don’t even display it at all because the Function Access Buttons (FAB) along the top of the display always has a small fuel section with the essential info visible at all times. That’s the beauty of the display – size and customisation. The drawback is in the complete lack of tactile response. It can be challenging to press the correct ‘button’ on the display whenever the jet is in motion as it is quite a bumpy ride at times. At present I am pressing the wrong part of the screen about 20% of the time in flight due to either mis-identification, or more commonly by my finger getting jostled around in turbulence or under G. One of the biggest drawbacks is that you can’t brace your hand against anything whilst typing – think how much easier it is to type on a smartphone with your thumbs versus trying to stab at a virtual keyboard on a large tablet with just your index finger.
 
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TomcatViP

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I don't see how someone would be embarrassed by the feeling of a 30+ years old experienced pilots expressing its feelings regarding the practicality of new technologies like the touchscreen that need from time to time double typing or the fact that there's isn't anymore a HUD.

The rest of the post was rather positive for the F-35 vanting the superior SA that its systems provide to the pilot (better than F-22 was the word), the improved helmet and so on..
 

starviking

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Some trouble with touch-screens, I would think not specific to the F-35:
the cockpit is beautiful to look at – nothing analogue, all digital with about 10 actual switches in the cockpit. Notice I say beautiful to look at, not necessarily beautiful to interact with! In theory the all-glass display is great. It’s touchscreen, you can set it up to show pretty much anything you want in any layout you want. Take, for example, a fuel display. You can have it in a large window that shows you everything you could possibly want to know about the aircraft’s fuel system; the contents of each tank, which pumps are operating, fuel temperature, centre of gravity etc. Or you can shrink it into a smaller window that only shows more basic info. Or you don’t even display it at all because the Function Access Buttons (FAB) along the top of the display always has a small fuel section with the essential info visible at all times. That’s the beauty of the display – size and customisation. The drawback is in the complete lack of tactile response. It can be challenging to press the correct ‘button’ on the display whenever the jet is in motion as it is quite a bumpy ride at times. At present I am pressing the wrong part of the screen about 20% of the time in flight due to either mis-identification, or more commonly by my finger getting jostled around in turbulence or under G. One of the biggest drawbacks is that you can’t brace your hand against anything whilst typing – think how much easier it is to type on a smartphone with your thumbs versus trying to stab at a virtual keyboard on a large tablet with just your index finger.

The USN decided to revert to more physical controls after the Fitzgerald incident

 

Josh_TN

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It sounds like the F-35's cockpit has trade offs. A much greater ability to view information combined with a decreased ability to interact with it reliably. A much more informative helmet view but with more limitations of how much info can be viewed compared to a HUD. The touch screen was always going to be a bit of gamble I feel. I wonder if the stick/throttle controls can interact with it for more basic commands?
 

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