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Lasserre Libellule, twin-boom 1946

Tophe

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In the Trait d'Union #244 (March-April 2009) is presented the Lasserre Libellule (dragonfly), revealed in "L'Aviation Française" of 1946. M. Lasserre was engineer at the SNCASO ('Sud-Ouest') company and wanted to create a fuel efficient airplane. It was being built in 1946 by the Pierre Trébod air-club but never finished it seems. Side by side two-seater with double commands. All in wood. Landing speed as low as 50km/h. Span 13m, Length 7.5m, Height 1.9m, Total weight 550kg, Max speed 130km/h."
I think I know it as "Aerosudouest Libellule" from another source. I have to check.
 

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Tophe

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Yes: in The Aeroplane Spotter Vol. VII No. 177 I found confirmation.
The reason of the twin-boom layout seems good visibility and easy access with a pusher propeller, like in many pre-war projects and prototypes.
 

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Grey Havoc

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Tophe said:
It was being built in 1946 by the Pierre Trébod air-club but never finished it seems. Side by side two-seater with double commands.

Would I be right in thinking that engine availability, or rather lack of it, is what killed off the Libellule? Quite a few French projects in the immediate post-war period fell by the wayside because of lack of suitable engines, or so I believe.
 

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Maybe. The type of engine is not mentionned. It is only explained that the goal was 10 liters of fuel for 100 kilometers at 100km/h (almost like a car of that time I think), a 4-hour flight should have been possible.
 

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The name "Libellule" was also used for a French aircraft designed "after-hours" by an engineer of a public company: Henri Brouard of SNCAM in 1937. It had tandem wings but was not of the "Pou du Ciel" principle, simply with classical controls.
(Source: Trait d'Union #164, Nov-Dec 1995)
 

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Jemiba

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Grey Havoc said:
Tophe said:
It was being built in 1946 by the Pierre Trébod air-club but never finished it seems. Side by side two-seater with double commands.

Would I be right in thinking that engine availability, or rather lack of it, is what killed off the Libellule? Quite a few French projects in the immediate post-war period fell by the wayside because of lack of suitable engines, or so I believe.

AFAIK, it was the lack of FRENCH engines, that could be obtained without the need for spending foreign currencies.
US engines would have been available, but only for payment in US $, which were in short supply in the European
countries during the early post-war years, not only in France.
 

hesham

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From JAWA 1947.
 

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hesham

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From Aviation Francaise 1946.
 

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hesham

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The name "Libellule" was also used for a French aircraft designed "after-hours" by an engineer of a public company: Henri Brouard of SNCAM in 1937. It had tandem wings but was not of the "Pou du Ciel" principle, simply with classical controls.
(Source: Trait d'Union #164, Nov-Dec 1995)
From Ailes.
 

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