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LARA (Light Armed Reconnaissance Aircraft)

Pioneer

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Nice contribution thanks RAP

Can't help but notice in meeting the 'six troop transportion requirements', that Beech located one of the soldiers in the rear most of the cockpit? But alas I only count five troop's....wonder where the sixth is located?
Regardless, it doesn't look overly comfortable - especially after two weeks in the bush, when living on ratpacks/MRE's

Regards
Pioneer
 

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kenfalzon

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Hi,

Also for LARA program,the Grumman G-340,a tandem two
seat Mohawk.
Hesham are you sure about the G-340 designation? Because the Grumman designation for the Mohawk is G-134.

Can someone ID the following supposedely LARA contender?
616220
 

hesham

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Yes I am sure,but we can say it's a different or a developed version of G-134A.
 

famvburg

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About 30+ years ago, my first dealings with resin display models was with Rick’s Models out of Ohio, I think. He sold basic blank kits and finished models. Nearly all of his models were 1/48, and since my scale is 1/72, I asked if there was any hope for us 1/72 fans. He said “No, the preferred scale for display models is 1/48”. Of course, the would custom-build anything in any scale, for a price. In 1989, I did buy a solid resin 1/72 B-2 and XF-12 Rainbow from him tho.
 

allysonca

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Rick bought a lot of models from Al Parker over the years. You may recall the yellow resin with the stinky smell. We've come a long way since then with newer materials that are lighter, sandable, and stable.
 

Basil

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An interesting feature of this Martin proposal with its inverted v tail is the use of exhaust gases for tail plane steering augmentation at low flight speeds. The turboprop's exhaust gases are rooted within the tailbooms and exhausted over the rudders. It was developed and patented by Hans Multhopp, chief designer of the Ta-183, during his time at Martin.
 

Valfour

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It would be a very interesting book as the LARA project was basically devised by two USMC aviators at China Lake - Col. K.P. Rice (who designed the triple ejector rack) and Maj. William Beckett - who even started building their own prototype before the project was turned into a major quad service acquisition. Of course USAF managed to destroy the projects intent from inside as it would have undermined much of their air concept and perceived monopoly. The main idea of the LARA being a short wingspan and highly simple to fly and maintain aircraft that can be attached to infantry battalions and other units like a jeep or a small boat. The OV-10 is a great plane but it’s no LARA.
K.P. Rice passed away on December 26, 2019
 

hesham

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Hi boys,
searching the previous posts about the LARA/COIN requirement (one of my favourite matters, for various and complex reasons) I found that some pictures I Have were never enclosed.
Two of them are particularly intriguing as I cannot say if are pure fiction or some real projetcs. The pictures are clipping (without any note about the subject) from two different advertisings; i think from an aircraft engine manifacturer and published on 'Aviation Week' circa 1967.
One other is the full scale mock-up of the Martin entry (rarely seen and still without known designation, I think).
The last is a cutaway drawing of the transport version of North American Na-300 (NA-301?).
Hoping you enjoy all
My dear Nico,

maybe they were from Garrett company,that is from Aviation magazine 1964,and this firm
designed some aircraft;

 

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riggerrob

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Yes
An interesting feature of this Martin proposal with its inverted v tail is the use of exhaust gases for tail plane steering augmentation at low flight speeds. The turboprop's exhaust gases are rooted within the tailbooms and exhausted over the rudders. It was developed and patented by Hans Multhopp, chief designer of the Ta-183, during his time at Martin.
[/QUOTE

Yes Basil,
Blown flaps were all the rage for heavily-loaded jets back during the 1960s. Bristol Buccaneer and Lockheed F-104 both had blown flaps to improve landing performance.
Blown control surfaces were needed to compensate for the short tail moment arm on LARA.
A disadvantage is that blowing hot air through tail booms vastly increases their heat signature at the same time that heat-sealing missiles were becoming fashionable.
The concept is being revived for the next generation of stealthy fighters to help reduce radar signature of aileron hinges.
 

riggerrob

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It would be a very interesting book as the LARA project was basically devised by two USMC aviators at China Lake - Col. K.P. Rice (who designed the triple ejector rack) and Maj. William Beckett - who even started building their own prototype before the project was turned into a major quad service acquisition. Of course USAF managed to destroy the projects intent from inside as it would have undermined much of their air concept and perceived monopoly. The main idea of the LARA being a short wingspan and highly simple to fly and maintain aircraft that can be attached to infantry battalions and other units like a jeep or a small boat. The OV-10 is a great plane but it’s no LARA.
Does anyone have sketches or photos of the first LARA prototype built at China Lake by Rice and Beckett?
It will amusing to compare their concept with what finally entered service.
I just watched “Pentagon Wars” about how the U S Army procured the M2 Bradley armoured infanytry fighting vehicle.
 

yasotay

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Pentagon Wars - a primer for anyone going into the Byzantine dungeon that is DoD acquisition.
 

Arjen

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Or read the book of the same title by James G Burton.
 
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Basil

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Riggerrob,
yes, passing turbine gases through long fuselage pipes would probably need serious heat isolation of the ducts for the Martin concept - besides the loss of room for fuel. However when the gases reach the exhaust slot at the rudders they would have perhaps cooled off enough to provide no relevant heat signature for missiles.
Interesting - I did not know about the radar masking ability via hot gases.
 

jmspeedfreak

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In terms of heat isolation as long as there is a reasonable flow of air over the transfer ducts they potentially wouldn't need much more than some basic heat-shielding. Lot of mixing at the rudder so potentially not the end of the world either - in any case the two engines would make a much more dominant target for an IR sensor surely?
 

jmspeedfreak

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Really liked that Martin design, similar to the Charger but the exhaust blown tail would have helped a lot with some of the issues of the latter. Deep cambered flaps would drive a big nose down pitching moment so pitch authority at low speed to maintain positive AoA control would have made the handling a lot more direct (maybe, possibly, perhaps!)
 

jmspeedfreak

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I realised this morning that it (looks like) the whole engine mass flow was going down the booms so definitely not just bleed air. I had an automotive program where close coupled catalysts at 900deg only required coated steel heatshield spaced less than 10mm off the cat to drop temps to under 180deg.C but I imagine inside the confines of the boom structure it could get pretty warm. I would expect they intended to have some cooling flow ducted in around the jetpipe to keep temperatures down. Actually ejecting the flow through the tail plane slots looks like a sensible way to reduce IR signature if anything.

Does anyone know if I could find a copy of the Martin proposal anywhere? I think some of the hardcore here ganged together to buy one off ebay(?)
 

AeroFranz

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the only thing that would cause concern (at least IMHO) is that the pitch response is coupled with engine throttle with this type of blowing. I'm sure it can be solved somehow, but i don't know how much of a headache that would be.
 

jmspeedfreak

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Brilliant, thanks Basil.
Our company has been working on very high power motors to drive empennage mounted compressors to achieve similar but with 'cold' air.
 

jmspeedfreak

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Well described patent document, I was thinking the single side engine out issues for the tail ie. Loss of control authority; must have been a concern for the customer... Until I remembered that all the LARA concepts were essentially very vulnerable to this failure mode. All these concepts could be redusted off with electric distributed propulsion or hybrid systems to reduce the weakness of the aircraft in this regard.
 
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