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Khrunichev's concept of manned space exploration

flateric

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Should we call it Orionsky...

From left to right
- basic modification of TKS-based reusable manned spacecraft (ok, TKS on steroids) for Angara-A3 (Angara-5P) (six crew)
- long-endurance (up to 30 days) modification of the first one with 3 crew
- space station module

More information at Vadim Lukashevich site http://buran.ru/htm/cliper05.htm and Anatoly Zak site http://www.russianspaceweb.com/tks_followon.html
 

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Michel Van

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Thanks for the Picture

Chelomei would be Pride
Please, can I post the Picture in italian Space Forum ???

here Picture TKS VA Merkur
21cd02c1.jpg

and the LK-700
 

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flateric

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Of course you can. Anyone could do these pics - this is not new MIG UCAV)))
 

Capt. David

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Michel Van said:
Chelomei would be Pride

N'yet! I suspect Chelomei would feel the same way he did when they took his Almaz station hulls away from him and turned them into the inferior Salyut stations. While this is obviously based on Chelomei's 11F74 VA, Chelomei is not credited with the design.
 

Michel Van

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that Desgin is the "DOS Conspiracy" by three of Chelomei's TsKBM engineers
back in August 1969

more here
http://www.astronautix.com/details/the51186.htm

Note: the term "Mishin was 'sick' " means he was in Alcohol withdrawal, again...
 

Capt. David

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Michel Van said:
that Desgin is the "DOS Conspiracy" by three of Chelomei's TsKBM engineers
back in August 1969

more here
http://www.astronautix.com/details/the51186.htm

Note: the term "Mishin was 'sick' " means he was in Alcohol withdrawal, again...

Where to place the blame depends on who you ask. This is Chertok's version of how this went down. ;)
 

blackstar

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NASA History Office release:

Rockets and People: Hot Days of the Cold War (Volume III)
by Boris Chertok
Dr. Asif Siddiqi, Series Editor
(Washington, D.C.: NASA SP-2009-4110), pp. 796 + xxiii, hardcover.

Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space
program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the
men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in
exploring space. The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, who worked
under the legendary Sergey Korolev, translated from the original
Russian, fill that gap. In Volume 1 of Rockets and People, Chertok
described his early life as an aeronautical engineer and his
adventures as a member of the Soviet team that searched postwar,
occupied Germany for the remnants of the Nazi rocket program. Volume 2
takes up the story with the development of the world’s first
intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) and ends with the launch of
Sputnik and the early moon probes.

In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of, and continues
the fascinating narrative of the Soviet space program in the 1960s,
arguably the peak of the effort. Chertok devotes a significant portion
of the volume to the early years of Soviet human spaceflight from 1961
to 1967, including the launch of the world’s first space voyager Yuri
Gagarin and gripping accounts of two of the most tragic episodes of
the Soviet space program, the death of Korolev and the flight and
death of cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov during the very first piloted
Soyuz flight in 1967. Furthermore, Chertok provides a radically unique
perspective on the Cuban Missile Crisis, from the point of view of
those who would have been responsible for unleashing nuclear
Armageddon in 1962 had Kennedy and Khrushchev not been able to agree
on a stalemate. He concludes focusing on the relationship between the
space program and the Soviet Academy of Sciences, which would serve as
great interest to historians of Soviet science.

How to order: Please contact the NASA Center for AeroSpace
Information, 7121 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076, 301-621-0390, help at sti.nasa.gov
, Online Order Form. The price code is EA5 (Within U.S. $25.00 plus
$2.00 shipping and handling: Outside U.S. $50.00 plus $17.00 S&H).

This book also may be purchased from the NASA Information Center, NASA
Headquarters, 300 E Street SW, Room 1H23, Washington, DC 20546-0001,
202-358-0000 or the Government Printing Office (866-512-1800 or ContactCenter at gpo.gov).
 

OM

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blackstar said:
NASA History Office release:

Rockets and People: Hot Days of the Cold War (Volume III)
by Boris Chertok
Dr. Asif Siddiqi, Series Editor
(Washington, D.C.: NASA SP-2009-4110), pp. 796 + xxiii, hardcover.

...And if Asif has anything to do with a book, it's pretty much a guarantee the book will be highly accurate, incredibly informative, *and* large enough to kill a small child if it falls off the table and onto the hapless rugrat.
 

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