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CERN experiments observe particle consistent with long-sought Higgs boson

saintkatanalegacy

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“We observe in our data clear signs of a new particle, at the level of 5 sigma, in the mass region around 126 GeV. The outstanding performance of the LHC and ATLAS and the huge efforts of many people have brought us to this exciting stage,” said ATLAS experiment spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti, “but a little more time is needed to prepare these results for publication.”
"The results are preliminary but the 5 sigma signal at around 125 GeV we’re seeing is dramatic. This is indeed a new particle. We know it must be a boson and it’s the heaviest boson ever found,” said CMS experiment spokesperson Joe Incandela. “The implications are very significant and it is precisely for this reason that we must be extremely diligent in all of our studies and cross-checks."

http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Releases2012/PR17.12E.html
 

Foxglove

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Wonder if it will ultimately help explain the enigma of dark matter and dark energy.
 

blackkite

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Congratulations CERN LHC.
http://atlas.ch/
Toshiba made 4 pole super cunducting magnets and super conducting solenoids for ATLAS.
IHI made low temperature helium compressors for LHC.
Furukawa made super conducting cables for LHC super conducting magnets.
Hamamatsu photonics made silicon detectors for ATLAS.
Source : Ahahi news paper
 

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Mat Parry

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A tremendous technical achievement, congratulations to all who have worked on this for the past 50 years or so.

Let us hope technologies tumble out of this discovery in the same way that they did from discovering and understanding the electron... I have to say I'm skeptical about this hope, however if it does happen many many strange and magical things could be within reach.

I'm 38 right now I hope to see some of this in my lifetime. :-\
 

saintkatanalegacy

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Yesterday: hello 4%
Today: hello 83%

"This is the first time [a dark matter filament] has been convincingly detected from its gravitational lensing effect," said astronomer Jörg Dietrich of the University Observatory Munich, in Germany. "It's a resounding confirmation of the standard theory of structure formation of the universe. And it's a confirmation people didn't think was possible at this point."

http://www.space.com/16412-dark-matter-filament-galaxy-clusters.html
 

robunos

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:D :) ;) :p ...


cheers,
Robin.
 

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Hobbes

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saintkatanalegacy said:
Yesterday: hello 4%
Today: hello 83%

"This is the first time [a dark matter filament] has been convincingly detected from its gravitational lensing effect," said astronomer Jörg Dietrich of the University Observatory Munich, in Germany. "It's a resounding confirmation of the standard theory of structure formation of the universe. And it's a confirmation people didn't think was possible at this point."

http://www.space.com/16412-dark-matter-filament-galaxy-clusters.html

It's an interesting observation, but we're no closer to knowing what dark matter is.
 

Flyaway

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Grey Havoc

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With regard as to the LHC's planned successor:
Experimental physics rarely tops the news agenda, but the 2008 launch of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) catapulted academic theories such as the search for the Higgs boson – also known as the “God Particle” – into the spotlight.

Now, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is planning for a successor of the LHC.

The new circular supercollider will sit next to its predecessor at CERN in Switzerland, but will be nearly three times its size, with a circumference of 100 kilometers. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) will pick up from the LHC to continue studying the smallest particles in the world.

Contributing to this revival of particle accelerators, the U.S. is getting its first new collider facility in decades, set to start operating around 2030. One of the missions of the Electro-Ion Collider (EIC) in New York will be to make particle acceleration more energy-efficient.

This should also impact the use of accelerators outside experimental physics. As successful as the LHC has been – eventually finding the Higgs boson in 2012 – particle accelerators come in many shapes and sizes. And they are used in a wide range of areas from radiation therapy for cancer to treating wastewater and cleaning flue gases from power plants.

As an aside, I find it interesting that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries paid for this article.
 

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