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Can you identify this plane?

Maveric

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This is the US William E. Horton "Wingless" from 1951.
 

riggerrob

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American Bill Horton test-flew his "Wingless" prototype briefly during 1953. The prototype was based upon a much-modified, military surplus, Cessna Crane light twin. The bulky fuselage provided the bulk of the lift, but it also had small, stub wings that swung out of the wing tips for takeoff and landing. Horton proposed a wide variety of larger Wingless airliners and transports, but as with most low aspect-ratio planks, it never got very far.
 

kitnut617

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When I subscribed to Kit Plane, a magazine for home-build builders of real aircraft, Barnaby Wainfan was the resident aero engineer for the magazine. He had a series of articles showing how he went about building his Facetmobile (IIRC it was in the 90's). This happened after a lot of discussion in the magazine about how the heck did the F-117 actually fly. It was his attempt to show sceptics the shape could and did fly. He flew it to Oshkosh a few times
 

BESTUZHEV

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When I subscribed to Kit Plane, a magazine for home-build builders of real aircraft, Barnaby Wainfan was the resident aero engineer for the magazine. He had a series of articles showing how he went about building his Facetmobile (IIRC it was in the 90's). This happened after a lot of discussion in the magazine about how the heck did the F-117 actually fly. It was his attempt to show sceptics the shape could and did fly. He flew it to Oshkosh a few times
realy interesting information, thank u, kitnut617.
 
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