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Burgess-Dunne

steelpillow

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Shortly before World War One, the American boatbuilder turned aircraft manufacturer came over to England and took out a license to build the Dunne swept-wing tailless aircraft. Dunne furnished him with information and Burgess eventually built some 19 machines. Most were floatplanes but a few were landplanes or convertible between the two.

Here is a link to a photo of one such: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Burgess-Dunne_AH-7_seaplane_US_Navy.jpg
What is intrigues me here is the machine in the background on the left hand side. It is another Dunne type floatplane, but is heavily staggered. Is Burgess experimenting, is the machine damaged, what is going on here?
 

Avimimus

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Interesting find! The Burgess-Dunne Model BD-5 has stagger, but this looks like a smaller design without a fuselage!
 

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Heres a rather interesting pic,its a close up of the Burgess-Dunne No6 seaplane from 1914.Interestingly the observer is packing a Benet-Mercie light machine gun tho one wonders how he would use it accurately without even some sort of basic pintle type mount for stability.Still if nothing else it really does show just how far we have come in the field of aircraft weaponry in the last 120 years.
redirect.jpg
 

steelpillow

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Heres a rather interesting pic,its a close up of the Burgess-Dunne No6 seaplane from 1914.Interestingly the observer is packing a Benet-Mercie light machine gun tho one wonders how he would use it accurately without even some sort of basic pintle type mount for stability.Still if nothing else it really does show just how far we have come in the field of aircraft weaponry in the last 120 years.
Very nice indeed, thank you. Unusually good detail of the ribbing on the downturned trailing edge (which helped provide automatic stall recovery, although I never heard of anybody who succeeded in stalling a Dunne biplane).
Gun mounts were rare at that time. The first air combats consisted of firing pistols or dropping grenades.
May I ask whose image it is?
 

Sineva

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Heres a rather interesting pic,its a close up of the Burgess-Dunne No6 seaplane from 1914.Interestingly the observer is packing a Benet-Mercie light machine gun tho one wonders how he would use it accurately without even some sort of basic pintle type mount for stability.Still if nothing else it really does show just how far we have come in the field of aircraft weaponry in the last 120 years.
Very nice indeed, thank you. Unusually good detail of the ribbing on the downturned trailing edge (which helped provide automatic stall recovery, although I never heard of anybody who succeeded in stalling a Dunne biplane).
Gun mounts were rare at that time. The first air combats consisted of firing pistols or dropping grenades.
May I ask whose image it is?
Certainly.Its from the NASM [National Air and Space Museum]
Theres also a site which has pics of various Burgess aircraft
http://aerofiles.net/_burgess.html
And this has some large pics of the AH7
https://www.history.navy.mil/conten...i-aviation/aircraft-us/burgess-dunne-ah7.html
And theres this article from the air and space mag which has some great pictures of various burgess types
https://www.airspacemag.com/history...tion-pioneer-youve-never-heard-180950149/?all
 

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I find it amusing that the float was just attached to the landing skid!
 

steelpillow

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I find it amusing that the float was just attached to the landing skid!
The plane was deliberately made like that so that it could be easily converted between land and water. Note the cross-axle attached to the upper side of the skids and their reinforcement at that point to take the plane's weight: the float would have been replaced by wheels for land use.
 

Sineva

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I`ve just found a picture of a period advert for the burgess-dunne,it features the bd6 and amazingly it appears that it could`ve been taken at the same time as the pic in my op.It shows in profile the bd6 and you can even see the observer aiming what certainly looks like a Benet-Mercie light machine gun
bd-ad.jpg
Interestingly it says "Burgess-Dunne 3 delivered to the us army december 30"[I`m assuming 1914],it also promotes the potential military advantages of the design "unprecedented arc of fire"
Sadly tho the quality of the actual pic is nothing great....

This pic shows the BD-1b,you can also the wheeled landing gear that was attached to the skids and that the axle is clearly visible for in the BD-6 pic in my op.
va-bd-06-cr-2k.jpg
 
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riggerrob

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During WW1, The Canadian Defence Ministry purchased a Burgess-Dunne airplane and shipped it England, where it rotted in the rain for a few months before being scrapped.
 

blackkite

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Hi! BD-5, BD-8 and BD-9.

In mid-1914, William Starling Burgess redesigned the John William Dunne aircraft, improving aerodynamics. The first aircraft, the BD-5, was purchased by the U.S. Navy, where it received the serial number AH-10.
During the operation, the benet-Mercie machine gun and light bomb suspension nodes were installed on the aircraft. The aircraft was used mainly for test flights and training of sea pilots. One such aircraft was purchased for $5,000 by the Canadian government.

The BD-5 was followed by several versions. In 1915 built three BD-6s (with a 140 hp Sturtevant 5A engine), they were ordered by the U.S. Navy, but only one machine delivered (A-55). In the same year, two very similar BD-7s with the same engine were produced.

In the summer of 1915, a single BD-8 was built specifically for Harry Payne Whitney. At the end of the same year, six sports BD-9s were ordered at once.

The latest models were ordered by the military to conduct a number of tests - the BD-10 tested radio capabilities, and the BDH-11 (or BD-11) to test reconnaissance cameras.

In total, 26 copies of Burgess-Dann aircraft were built in a few years.

However, the Anglo-American "tailless" did not find a market in the United States. The military ordered only a few aircraft, and a small number were sold to private individuals, but after the U.S. entered World War I, orders were no longer received.

Massaerohistory.org. The Burgess Company 1909-1919
Vintageairphotos.com. The Birth of the American Flying Wing
 

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blackkite

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"Foreign partner of Dunne was an American entrepreneur, aircraft designer and builder of high-speed yachts S. Burgess (William Starling Burgess). In 1913, intrigued by the unique properties of Dunne's tailless biplanes, he acquired a license to manufacture such aircraft in the United States. Burgess modified the D.8, simplifying the design, reducing its weight and installing a more powerful engine.

The first version of the Burgess-Dunne aircraft was similar to Dunne's original design. From the end of 1913 to 1915, five aircraft were produced, distinguished by minor design changes and propulsion systems. So the BD-1A, BD-1B and BD-2 were powered by an eight-cylinder Curtiss OXX engine with 100 hp, and the BD-3 and BD-4 had French nine-cylinder engines with a capacity of 120 and 135 hp, respectively.

The BD-2 aircraft was also interested by the military.
They ordered BD-2 for the U.S. Army and the Navy. Navy BD-2 had conventional float, which received the military designation AH-7, the second for the army was converted with a wheeled chassis.

The AH-10 (piloted by Lieutenant Patrick Bellendger) became the first American aircraft to reach an altitude of 10,000 feet on April 23, 1915."

I think the last three side view shows BD-2, because the engine is Curtiss OXX.

Massaerohistory.org. The Burgess Company 1909-1919
Vintageairphotos.com. The Birth of the American Flying Wing
 

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blackkite

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Number of manufactured aircraft

BD-1A : 1, BD-1B : 2 (1 for Canada), BD-2 (AH-7): 2, BD-3 : 1, BD-4 : 1, BD-5 (AH-10) : 1

BD-6 : 3, BD-7 : 2, BD-8 : 1, BD-9 : 9, BD-10 : Cancelled, BDH-11 : 1, Total : 24 (2 : unknown, B-D-F and B-D-H?)
 

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blackkite

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Hi! BD-9.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–9 Sportsman Seaplane was a two place, tandem swept wing tailless pusher biplane. There were six built. It was first ordered by G.L. Cabot in 1915.

Sportsman Seaplane Model BD–9 was powered by a Sturtevant Model 5 V–8 140 hp water cooled engine with an endurance of four hours. It had a span of 46', length 23' and a live load of 670 lbs.

Cabot's Burgess–Dunne was named the "Lark" and was the 13th BD built. In 1916 Clifford Webster and Cabot flew the Burgess–Dunne patrolling over Massachusetts Bay prior to Cabot leaving for Pensacola for formal Navy Flight Training in 1917. In late 1915 Cabot had formed the Independent Aviation Corps which in 1916 became the Massachusetts Naval Militia. This first formal state militia unit had a training and patrol base with a maintenance hangar on Great Misery Island in outer Salem Harbor. The unit operated three privately owned Burgess–Dunne aircraft, a loaned Burgess–Dunne from the Burgess Company and a Burgess Model U of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The unit became part of the U.S. Navy in April 1917 and was assigned coastal patrol duties along the New England coast.

In addition to Cabot's BD, BD–9 types were also sold to naval militia members: Norman Cabot BD–9 #14 and Eben Draper BD–9 #17. Two BD–9s were delivered to the New York State Naval Militia and one BD–9 to the New Jersey Naval Militia.

Note: There are no photos of Model BD–10
The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–10 was a two place, side by side, swept wing, tailless pusher biplane. It was ordered by the U.S. Army on September 27, 1916. The price was $14,000. This special BD model was planned to be used for remote controlled torpedo experiments developed by John Hays Hammond of Gloucester. The contract price included state of the art radio sending and receiving equipment to be installed in the aircraft.

Model BD–10 was powered by a Sturtevant Model 5 V–8 140 hp engine. It had a span of 46', chord 5', gap 6'6", length 27' with forward stagger of the upper wing. Its equipment weight was 200lbs and its gross weight was 2,220 lbs. Its U.S. Army Serial number was #136.

The order was cancelled on June 18, 1917. The mission was eventually accomplished by the assignment of an Army Curtiss R–4."

https://www.massairspace.org/virtualexhibit/vex2/BFC80A2A-180D-40A7-8C77-812503385520.htm
 

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blackkite

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Hi! BD-1.
"Model BD–1B
The Burgess Company Burgess D–Dunne Model BD–1B was a two place, tandem, swept wing tailless pusher biplane, built with parts salvaged from the BD–1A crash, but was essentially a new aircraft. Construction was started in February 1914 with its first flight on March 4, 1914 by Clifford Webster.

Modifications included removing the nacelle, creating an open cockpit, adding space for a passenger increasing the span by one foot and the length by for feet four inches. This aircraft was used to train Burgess aviators and for local contract and demonstration flights.

Model BD–1B had a Curtiss OXX 8 cyl water cooled 100 hp engine, an 8'5" two bladed propeller and a speed of 55mph. It had a 4 gallon oil tank and a 22 gallon gasoline tank. Its span was 47', wing area 428 sq ft, chord 6', height 11' and its length 24'8". Its float length was 17'8", width 31" and depth 15". Its empty weight was 1450 lbs and gross weight of 1700 lbs.
It was tested with wheels as a land plane at the leased Harvard Aviation Field, Squantum, Quincy, Massachusetts. Water based testing with a new central float design was held at Marblehead and Salem. It was sold on September 17, 1914 to Captain E. L. Janney for the Canadian Aviation Corps for a price of US $5,000.

It was shipped to North Hero, Vermont by rail and then flown from Lake Champlain to the Province of Quebec. Cliff Webster with Janney onboard made a three day stop at Deschaillons, P.Q. for engine repairs and then flew to the final delivery point at Quebec City. From here the Burgess–Dunne was shipped overseas to England.

The BD–B1 was Canada's first military aircraft. However, after its transatlantic voyage as deck cargo and arriving in England, the BD–1B was set aside, never flown or utilized in any way and eventually scrapped. In 2001 a full scale, authentic model of this Model BD was constructed by Barry MacKeracher of Osgood, Ontario and sold to the National Air Force Museum in Trenton, Ontario.

Model BD–1A Information:
Note: No photos for Model BD–1A
Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–1A was a one place swept wing tailless pusher biplane. It was the First Burgess–Dunne type built by the Burgess Company in Marblehead under the patent licensing agreement with John Dunne and the Blair Athol Aeroplane Syndicate Ltd. The first Model BD aircraft was to serve as a test bed seaplane/land version for W. Starling Burgess's planned modifications to the basic Dunne design.

The first model had a nacelle for the pilot and was fitted out to provide for easy conversion from seaplane to land version. Built in late 1913 with a single central float, the Model BD–1 was made ready for its first flight on January 26, 1914 from Marblehead Harbor piloted by Burgess himself.

Model BD–1A had a Curtiss OXX 100 hp engine, a span of 46', wing area 595 sq ft, length 20'4.5", chord 6', gap 6 and a central float length of 17'8.75".

Dual lever controls for elevators/ailerons used both levers back to climb and both levers forward to descend. Lateral control used the same wingtip ailerons/elevators. Banked turns were made by pulling one lever backwards and pushing the other forward. A left hand turn was made by pulling the left hand lever back and pushing the right hand lever forward.

The BD–1A's maiden flight on January 26, 1914 by W. Starling Burgess resulted in an aborted takeoff run due to his "running out of harbor", and pulling back the levers to the stops. The Burgess–Dunne pitched up steeply, stalling and coming down hard on the rear of the float resulting in a crash among the ice floes which severely damaged the aircraft. The damage was so extensive that the first BD–1 was completely rebuilt as BD–1B.
This model BD–1A was the first of 26 Burgess–Dunne aircraft built. Burgess sold 24 BD hydroaeroplanes and 2 were destroyed in test flight crashes at Marblehead. Burgess aviator Clifford Webster had the distinction of flying every Burgess–Dunne built and is the source for the total production and loss numbers."

https://www.massairspace.org/virtualexhibit/vex2/7DD66070-76AE-429C-8202-462854531710.htm
 

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blackkite

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Hi! BD-7.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–7 was as two place, side by side, swept wing, tailless pusher biplane with a flying boat hull. It was ordered by Vincent Astor in March 1915 and two were built. Astor's original BD order was built and being flight tested when on May 5, 1915 it hit the Marblehead causeway seawall while attempting to land in Marblehead harbor. The pilot Clifford Webster and the mechanic on board Richard Korman survived without serious injuries. The Astor Burgess–Dunn was demolished. The work to build the replacement Burgess Dunne began immediately with a more traditional design with a central float replacing the flying boat hull.

The first flight of the new BD–7 was on August 13, 1915. It was delivered to Astor on August 19, 1915 at a price of $14,000.
It had a Sturtevant V–8 140 hp engine with a minimum speed of 40 mph, maximum speed of 70 mph and an endurance of four hours. It had unique four section wings, swept back at a compound angle of 30 degrees. It was a single float seaplane with wingtip floats, a span of 46'6", length 31' and a live load of 350 lbs.

Burgess Company also built a custom floating hangar for Astor that could be towed behind his yacht "Noma" to house and service the Burgess Dunne."
 

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blackkite

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BDF (BDF-12) additional information.
"The last project where William Starling Burgess used the design of John William Dunne was the three-seater flying boat BDF (or BDF-12, where the 12th number of the project).
This aircraft combined two structures at once - the fuselage of a flying boat designed by Curtiss and wings from the Dunne aircraft with a 30-degree sweep.

In the summer of 1916, the BDF prototype was completed and offered for testing directly by the U.S. Navy and Air Corps. But the military did not show any interest in the flying boat."

Massaerohistory.org. The Burgess Company 1909-1919
Vintageairphotos.com. The Birth of the American Flying Wing
Aerofiles.com. Burgess
Jane's All The World Aircraft 1919
E.R. Johnson. American Flying boats and Amphibious aircraft
 

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blackkite

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blackkite

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Hi! Additional BD-6 information.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–6 was a two place, tandem, swept wing, tailless pusher biplane. Three were ordered by the U.S. Navy in May 1915. Three were built.

Model BD–6 was powered by a Sturtevant 5A 140 hp V–8 engine weighing 550 lbs. It had a span of 45', wing area 477 sq ft, length overall 20'2" with fuselage 16'9". It had a maximum weight of 2,900 lbs. It had a maximum speed of 80 mph with a climb rate of 250 fpm and endurance of four hours. Each had a price of $11,500.

Model BD–6's first flights were in December 1915 to Pensacola in the spring of 1916. Flight testing at Pensacola by Cliff Webster determined that these three aircraft although well streamlined and the most attractive Burgess–Dunne ever built, were unfortunately longitudinally unstable. They were particularly difficult to control in a dive. The Navy returned the three aircraft to the Burgess Company for modifications.

Problems were identified after wind tunnel testing at MIT. Burgess rebuilt the A–55 for re–positioning and re–shaping of the wing surfaces, the center of gravity was shifted, which fixed the fore and aft stability problem. However, the expense to fix the other two was too costly for the Navy. The end result was the cancellation of the order at less than the cost incurred by the Burgess Company.

U.S. Navy Serial #A–55 was accepted. A–54 and A–56 were not accepted and the contract funding for the required modifications was cancelled."

BD-6 vertical shape radiator design and fuselage tail shape are impressive.
https://flic.kr/p/spwEPc View: https://www.flickr.com/photos/amphalon/17331539305


https://www.massairspace.org/virtualexhibit/vex2/5711ED06-2595-4549-BDC4-179134547323.htm

http://vintageairphotos.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-birth-of-american-flying-wing.html

https://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/V...-Sheets/Display/Article/197508/sturtevant-5a/
 

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blackkite

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Hi! Additional BD-5 information.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–5 was a swept wing, tailless pusher biplane. It was ordered by the U.S. Navy on December 5, 1914 and delivered in April 1915. Acceptance at Pensacola was delayed due to performance problems resulting to the Navy's own admission that "the original specifications were unduly severe for the state of the art". Specifications required a complete complement of aeronautical instruments and tools.

Model BD–5 was a two place side by side with crew nacelle. It had no bustle at the apex of either wing. The one built had a Curtiss OXX V–8 100 hp engine with a price of $5,000 without the engine.

The BD–5 AH–10 was piloted by Lt. Bellinger on April 23, 1915 and set the altitude record for seaplanes at 10,000 feet over Pensacola, Florida. This aircraft was used to spot for the U.S. Army Coast Artillery at Fort Munroe, Virginia on August 5, 1915.

Its special equipment included an installed Benet–Mercie machine gun and was the first U.S. N aircraft armed with an automatic weapon on January 8, 1917. Bomb racks were installed in March 1916. This Burgess–Dunne was used for operational aerial gunnery and bomb tests. This aircraft was damaged in a collision with a schooner off Mobile, Alabama on March 7, 1916 and was rebuilt and returned to service on August 22, 1916. Its U.S.N. Serial was AH–10."

https://ww2aircraft.net/forum/threads/if-it-can-fly-it-can-float.39479/page-71
 

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blackkite

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Hi! Additional BD-2 information.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–2 was a swept wing tailless pusher biplane, ordered by the U.S. Navy early in 1914. Its first flight was on October 10, 1910 and delivered to Pensacola in late October 1914. It was designated as a Navy Trainer. There was only one built.

Model BD–2 was a two place, side by side and had dual controls. Its span was 47', length 24, height 11' and wing area was 482 sq ft. Its gross weight was 2,150 lbs and had a maximum speed of 75mph.

Model BD–2 had a single central float with two small wingtip floats. At one point during its operational career at Pensacola photos show that it displayed a unique and distinctive overall lavender and green camouflage design. Modifications also included a bomb rack for tests installed under the left wing.
Model BD–2 was stricken from Navy records in January 1916. Its U.S.N. Serial # was AH–7."
 

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blackkite

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Hi! BD-3 display model and additional information.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BD–3 was a swept wing tailless pusher biplane. It was ordered in March 1913 for the U.S. Army and delivered on December 30, 1914. It was a two place, tandem, had a crew nacelle and was land and sea capable. It was armored with chrome steel plate.

It was powered by a Salmson B 9 cyl 120 hp radial water cooled engine with a maximum speed of 75mph and a climb rate of 300–350 fpm. The only one built had a span of 47', height 10'11" and a length of 24'8". Its empty weight was 1700 lbs and gross weight was 2140/2300 lbs.

Two Model BD–3's were originally ordered – Serial # 36 and #136. #136 was cancelled. Serial #36 was delivered to San Diego, California. In the spring of 1915 floats were removed and wheels installed – the BD #36 was then assigned to the U.S. Army Coast Artillery for fire control support.

The U.S. Army Serial #36 was dropped from active service on October 18, 1916"

I can see vertical radiators at the both sides of the fuselage.

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235031025-burgess-dunne-floatplane/
https://www.massairspace.org/virtualexhibit/vex2/DAC9D9F5-8CF6-44FD-B51F-336149318996.htm
 

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blackkite

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Hi! BD-4 additional information.
"The Burgess Company Burgess Dunne Model BD–4 was a swept wing tailless pusher biplane. It was a prototype model built as a military type demonstrator similar in design and specifications to the BD–3 and BD–5 Models built for the U.S. Army and Navy. There was one built.

This military model had special modifications including an armor protected fuselage and mounting of a light machine gun. It was powered by a Gyro 110 hp rotary engine or optionally a Salmson 9 cyl 135 hp radial engine.

This model became known as the "Russian Burgess–Dunne" after a visit to Marblehead by Gaston, Williams and Wigmore of New York, a firm that was known to represent the Russian Czarist government and other European countries.
They and other buyer's agents discussed with Burgess military aircraft types on their client's want lists. During the period of January through March of 1915 there were recurring reports in the local newspapers and national aviation magazines of a series of these visits to the Burgess Company by agents of European clients but no apparent sales were made. A number of photos of this aircraft were published in the local press along with rather assumptive press statements in regard to large contracts pending. Burgess used the attention and related publicity as an opportunity to provide press releases, aircraft photos and to express interest in obtaining contracts and highlight their capability to provide aircraft quickly to European countries and to the United States military and naval services."
 

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blackkite

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Hi! BD-9 larger image and addditional BDH-11 information.
"The Burgess Company Burgess–Dunne Model BDH–11 Reconnaissance Type was a two place, side by side, swept wing, tailless, pusher biplane. One was built with military requirements.

Model BDH–11 was powered by a Curtiss OXX2 100 hp engine or a Sturtevant Model 5 V–8 140 hp water cooled engine. It had a torpedo like fuselage with a central float and was built in the summer of 1916. It had a span of 46'6", length 31', live load 350 lbs. It had a minimum speed of 40 mph, maximum speed of 70 mph and an endurance of four hours.

No record of any sale can be found for this model BDH."
 

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blackkite

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Hi!
 

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