Argentinian AF jet-assisted C-47

boxkite

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Does a picture exist to confirm this sketch of an Argentinian Air Force C-47 fitted with an additional Turbomeca Marboré 2C (from aero April 1965)? Or was it an April joke?

Dronte, it's your turn ;) ...
 

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Hello Boxkite!

Is not a joke. That is the TA-05 the first Argentine airplane that reached the South Pole in Nov 3 ' 65. In addition to the Turbomeca Maboré II of 400 kg of push for the takeoff it used a JATO rocket battery . Propellers, reactors and rockets in same plane! Flew additional 200 hs before being retired in the ' 69, at the moment is in the national museum of aeronautics of Buenos Aires.

Greetings

(souce of pics and information: "Aeroespacio" magazine 469 and 492)

More info: http://www.marambio.aq/escuadrilla.htm
 

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Thank you, Dronte.

It seems the Argentinian derivative was the only aircraft with three different propulsion systems in one vehicle at the same time - piston engines, turbojet and rocket. Is there another example for such a combination?
 
boxkite said:
aircraft with three different propulsion systems in one vehicle at the same time - piston engines, turbojet and rocket. Is there another example for such a combination?
Some Fairchild C-199 Boxcar transports had piston piston + jet. So did the Nord 2504 Noratlas.

When JATO was used on them, you'd have the same effect.

(to be clear, I have seen JATO used on both Boxcars and Noratlases, but I don't have proof that it was also used specifically on their jet-augmented version)
 
Hi everyone, here are some images of TA-05 at the MNA in Buenos Aires. A number of years ago I was given a tour of the museum by one of the guys involved in its restoration and snapped a few images. To add to the pictures, you can see the ad hoc nature of the installation by examining the exhaust from the exterior. Note that the hori stab has had local strengthening applied. Within the interior a cutout has been made to show the intake ducting and location of where the Marbore sat. You can see the exhaust outlet at its end. Note the extra fuel tanks within its interior, with avgas and avtur tanks thus marked, leaving little room for any reasonable sized cargo. There is also a close-up of the RATO bottle installation on its belly.

Here is a link to a few more:


Please excuse me while I make myself familiar with this forum and its astounding content. I will regularly be dredging up long dormant threads, hopefully with stuff that will fit with the narrative. I hope this doesn't present a problem with long-time contributors and readers.
 

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With the additional weight of the jet engine so far aft of the original CoG how did they compensate for that? Anybody an idea?
 
Welcome dear nuuumann,
Great photos.
You are welcome to contribute to old threads here.
We prefer to have all entries about a specific airplane in the same thread.
Sometimes moderators split-off a one-off thread, but they should still be easy to link from the main C-47 thread. For example, moderators will probably link this to other C-47 threads.

Remember that the South Pole is about 9,000 feet above sea level. Even with cold, dry air, that is still a high density altitude. Combine the density altitude with the massive amounts of fuel and it is little wonder that many transports us JATO or jet assist to take off from the South Pole.
 
Yup. Too true.
Remember that the South Pole is about 9,000 feet above sea level.

There is an ex-VX-6 C-47 that operated from the ice and has been preserved in a museum in Christchurch, so it was of great interest for me to get to take a close look at TA-05. I was surprised when I asked the guy who showed me around the aircraft if he had heard of the Erebus disaster that he had not, despite advising me that Aerolineas Argentinas once flew sight-seeing flights over the continent.
 

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