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Airspeed Transport Projects from 1942

Schneiderman

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In 1942 Airspeed commenced work on designs for a twin-engine freight transport aircraft as AS55. Here are two of the preliminary concepts from June 1942 that do not bear the number AS55 but are clearly part of the early work on that project.
 

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lark

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Could it be that the drawings are made by a Mr. Pegram in preparation
for something more extensive.. :)
 

Schneiderman

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lark said:
Could it be that the drawings are made by a Mr. Pegram in preparation
for something more extensive.. :)
No, the drawings I post on here are concepts and projects for which I have little information. These two I retraced as the originals are in very poor condition
 

robunos

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Interesting drawings...
The first one is clearly descended from the Horsa, and the second, despite being twin-boomed, shows definite hints of the Ambassador...

cheers,
Robin.
 

riggerrob

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robunos said:
Interesting drawings...
The first one is clearly descended from the Horsa, and the second, despite being twin-boomed, shows definite hints of the Ambassador...

cheers,
Robin.

.............................................:............

That first profile looks like a combination of Horsa and Hamilcar X assault gliders. The nose cargo hatch is definitely based on lessons-learned with Hamilcar, while the wings and aft fuselage show Horsa influence.
I hope it weighed more like a Horsa because the Hamilcar X was severely underpowered with a pair of Bristol Mercury 965 horsepower radial engines. Hamilcar X could not take off on its own power and could barely maintain cruise altitude on hot days. The only advantage Hamilcar X enjoyed was self-recovery (empty) after delivering supplies to the battlefield.
 

CJGibson

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"The only advantage Hamilcar X enjoyed was self-recovery (empty) after delivering supplies to the battlefield."

That was the intention all along.

Chris
 

Petrus

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Here you've got info on the AS.55 from 'Airspeed Aircraft Since 1931' by H.A. Taylor.

Piotr
 

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Schneiderman

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Schneiderman said:
In 1942 Airspeed commenced work on designs for a twin-engine freight transport aircraft as AS55. Here are two of the preliminary concepts from June 1942 that do not bear the number AS55 but are clearly part of the early work on that project.
And here is the alternative version of Scheme 1 with deeper and wider fuselage
 

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Schneiderman

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Airspeed AS58 project was the Horsa 2, a transport glider with a hinged nose and twin nose wheels. Associated with this was a proposal for a powered version fitted with two AS Cheetahs, the engines to enable the glider to return to base. This 1944 drawing appears to be the same project but powered by two P&W Wasps
 

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hesham

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Amazing drawing,thank you for sharing us Schneiderman.
 

avion ancien

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I wonder which came first, the concept of the AS.55-2 or the Fairchild Packet, and whether the Noratlas offers more than a nod in the direction of the former? The Packet, as ultimately it emerged, seems to date from about 1943, a year after the date attributed to the AS.55-2. Was there any interaction between their designers or was each the product of independent thinking? The Noratlas, obviously, followed much later in time.
 

CJGibson

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Welllll...I've spent the last two years pondering that very question. Budd Conestoga must be in with a shout, but to me it's the Ar 232. The requirement was issued in 1939, so probably wins by a nose.

Chris
 

avion ancien

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Whilst I acknowledge your point about the Conestoga - despite the fact that it isn't a 'twin boomer' - I sincerely hope that there was no interaction between the designer of the Ar 232 and the rest!
 

riggerrob

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The Gotha 242 assault glider first flew in 1941. It had twin booms and large cargo doors in the aft end of the Center pod.
Gotha also built 174 Gotha 244 transports with Gnome Rhone 700 horsepower radial engines. They could carry cargo or up to 23 soldiers. Range was short, barely more than 220 miles.
 

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