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Author Topic: Patriot SAM replacement  (Read 67249 times)

Offline seruriermarshal

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #315 on: April 05, 2017, 06:48:22 pm »
Saudi forces shoot down 4 Houthi ballistic missiles

RIYADH: Royal Saudi Air Defense Forces intercepted four ballistic missiles launched by Houthi insurgents in Yemen toward the Saudi cities of Khamis Mushayt and Abha early Tuesday, the Saudi-led Arab Coalition said.
In a statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency, the Coalition command said the missiles were shot down and destroyed at 6:30 a.m. without causing any damage.
A short video shared on social media showed Saudi Patriot missiles intercepting the Houthi missiles.

As a further counter-measure, Coalition air forces immediately targeted the launching sites in Yemen, the statement said.
It said the continued targeting by Houthi insurgents of Saudi cities with ballistic missiles “is the largest evidence of continuing smuggling of weapons to Yemen by all ways and means, especially from the port of Hodeidah.”
Coalition forces and the US Navy have separately intercepted Iranian weapons being sent to Houthis in the past two years.
Saudi Arabia has repeatedly accused Iran of fomenting unrest in the Middle East.

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1075501/saudi-arabia

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #316 on: April 08, 2017, 04:29:55 am »
Army's $7B IAMD program flunks major test, plans do-over in hopes of production transition


The Army is planning a do-over operational test for the $7 billion Integrated Air and Missile Defense program after the Limited User Test conducted last year did not produce results sufficient to support a production decision, triggering a further delay in the Northrop Grumman-led project to build an integrated fire-control network to better shield ground forces from air and missile threats.

The IAMD project office scrapped plans for a milestone C review slated for the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 -- between January and March -- and now plans to conduct a second Limited User Test before asking to transition the program from engineering and manufacturing development into low-rate initial production, according to an Army spokesman.

"The Army has finished assessing the results of the Limited User Test (LUT) conducted in the third quarter of fiscal 2016," Dan O'Boyle, a spokesman for the IAMD program office at Redstone Arsenal, AL, said in a April 7 statement. "The Army is currently planning a second LUT prior to a milestone C decision."

The IAMD project office originally planned to transition to low-rate initial production last August. Last summer, the project was still awaiting the Operational Material Assessment Report -- a finding that would inform readiness of the program to proceed with production -- and delayed the review until early 2017. The baseline IAMD program calls for the project to transition to production no later than this August to avoid a formal schedule breach.

In January, the Pentagon's top weapons tester reported to Congress and the defense secretary dismal results of the IAMD testing in 2016. The LUT -- conducted March through May at White Sands Missile Range, NM -- included sustained operations to assess reliability, two missile flight tests, and hardware-in-the-loop events to assess effectiveness and suitability.

"Despite DOT&E's concerns that IAMD is an immature system and not ready for a milestone C decision, the Army elected to proceed with the LUT as an operational test," the Pentagon's then-top weapons tester, J. Michael Gilmore, wrote.

"Due to [Army]IAMD software immaturity and limited capability to effectively operate at a much-echelon level, soldiers were unable to effectively coordinate with engagement and identification authorities, a key function in air defense," Gilmore found.

The IAMD system is required to demonstrate a 90 percent likelihood of operating for 72 hours without a failure that results in a system abort; during the LUT the system clocked just a 6 percent likelihood of working for three days straight without failure, according to the DOT&E report.

Software immaturity tripped up the Engagement Operations Center -- a "critical" IAMD subsystem -- during the LUT which demonstrated the ability to operate on average 16 hours without a failure, far below the minimum requirement of 446 hours, according to the weapons tester.

"The computer workstations in the EOC were not reliable and a constant source of frustration for operators," Gilmore wrote. "Due to IBCS software immaturity, workstations lagged and froze during mission operations, significantly affecting crew operations and mission execution."

Another problem was IAMD's inability to operate on Link 16 -- a key tactical data-exchange network -- and "significant problems with dual tracks and reporting responsibility with the IBCS network."

Since the LUT, the Army says the program has shown progress.

"The Army Integrated Air and Missile Defense (AIAMD) program has since taken delivery of two IAMD Battle Command System (IBCS) software builds that have demonstrated marked improvement over the LUT software," said O'Boyle. 

The service plans to spend a total of $2.5 billion on development and $4.4 billion on procurement to buy 16 fully configured systems for development and 427 IAMD Battle Command Systems for operational use.

"The AIAMD program is being developed to network sensors, weapons and a common battle management system across an integrated fire control network to support engagement of air and missile threats," the Army spokesman said. "As such, the system is software intensive, with project managers focusing on the software before providing the weapon system's capability to the warfighter."

In development since 2009, the Army aims to use the IAMD program to pivot from traditional system-centric weapon systems acquisition toward a component-based acquisition. When complete, the Army expects IAMD to provide a full, network-centric, "plug-and-fight" integration of existing and future air and missile defense forces and systems.

IAMD aims to integrate capabilities such as the Sentinel radar and Patriot air-defense launchers through a new interface that provides battle management data and allows networked operations.

The IAMD program office is responsible for the Army's portion of a joint integrated air and missile defense "system-of-systems" capability, and is focused on developing and fielding the IAMD Battle Command System. Raytheon and Lockheed Martin are major subcontractors on the IAMD program.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #317 on: April 12, 2017, 07:04:12 am »
Poland air defense: The search for the right missile mix [Commentary]

With IBCS in the LOR it gives Raytheon a huge leg up with the NASAMS for Nareau..
« Last Edit: April 12, 2017, 08:24:23 am by bring_it_on »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Offline marauder2048

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #319 on: May 11, 2017, 02:05:18 pm »
We have a (re) winner!

May 11, 2017

Raytheon Co. - Integrated Defense Systems, Woburn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $52,686,179 fixed-price-incentive-firm engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) contract for Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar (3DELRR) System. Contractor will provide EMD of three 3DELRR production representative units. Work will be performed at Andover, Massachusetts, and is expected to be complete by Nov. 30, 2020. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition with two offers received. Fiscal 2017 research, development, test, and evaluation funds in the amount of $5,500,000 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity (FA8730-17-C-0018).

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #320 on: May 11, 2017, 04:00:24 pm »
I guess now the Army can move quicker now that these two radars will likely share common technologies. Hope Raytheon shares an image of their demonstrator radar..
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 04:02:18 pm by bring_it_on »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #321 on: May 19, 2017, 02:51:41 am »
Northrop Grumman confirms it did not bid in 3DELRR recompete


Quote
Raytheon and Lockheed both bid in the second round, but Northrop confirmed to Inside the Air Force May 18 it did not. The company declined to comment on its reason for not competing. Lockheed told ITAF it did bid and is still evaluating whether it will protest the new award to Raytheon.

Without an explanation from Northrop, it's unclear why the company chose not to bid on the effort. However, a primary reason for its initial protest was the service's failure to communicate consistent instruction around whether bidders could include future IRAD investments in their cost proposals. When preparing bids for the first competition, both Raytheon and Northrop asked the service if they could consider future IRAD in their proposals. When the service denied the request, Northrop accepted it and Raytheon inquired further. The service ultimately changed its stance, but did not communicate that change to Northrop.

The Air Force did not provide more information about how its second RFP addressed IRAD investment by press time (May 18).

The Air Force's 3DELRR deputy program manager, Lt. Col. Michael Alexander, said in a May 17 email the recompete delayed the program 31 months and pushed initial operational capability to 2023 and full operational capability to 2029. To mitigate the impact of the delay, the Air Force amended the second solicitation to include full-rate production options "in order to maximize benefits of a competitive environment and set the table for faster fielding of capability after government testing," according to a May 11 press release.
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #322 on: May 24, 2017, 06:53:38 am »
A Modified Stunner/Sky-Ceptor?

FY18 - Advanced Missile Demo - Low-cost Extended Range Air Defense

Quote
Description: This effort matures key technologies of a lower-cost interceptor system with a low- to medium-altitude, medium-to long-range capability. This effort will enable lower cost interceptor integration into a net-enabled Air and Missile Defense Task Force for the protection of high value assets. Technologies will address the defeat of air defense threats such as UAS and Cruise Missile threats with secondary capabilities against Large Caliber Rockets (LCR), Short Range Ballistic Missiles (SRBM), and Tactical Air-to-Surface Missiles (TASMS).

FY 2016 Accomplishments:
Completed design and began static testing of solid rocket motor; completed target generator for hardware-in-the-loop calibration and testing of active radar seeker, guidance electronics, and control system; completed wind tunnel testing and aerodynamic analysis of interceptor.

FY 2017 Plans:
Continue component development and maturation for low-cost air defense interceptor system; complete static testing and evaluation of solid rocket motor design; continue development of secure digital data link, flight termination system, and control actuation system; complete development, fabrication, and integration of guidance electronics unit (GEU); and begin subsystem test and evaluation; complete hardware-in-the-loop simulation tools and apparatus required to test interceptor navigation instrumentation, data link components, and control system technologies; and evaluate navigation instruments for eventual flight demonstration testing.

FY 2018 Plans:
Will mature the low-cost air defense interceptor system with integrated solid rocket motor, digital data link, mission computer,
power system, and flight termination system and demonstrate in ballistic flight testing; provide system analysis via hardwarein-the-loop flight simulation of the digital data link, mission computer, power system, navigation system, and control actuation
system.

« Last Edit: May 24, 2017, 06:57:28 am by bring_it_on »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #323 on: May 25, 2017, 12:51:54 pm »
New Raytheon radar showcases reliability, 360-degree capability

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PELHAM, N.H., May 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon Company's (NYSE: RTN) newest integrated air and missile defense radar has been busy since its debut at the 2016 Winter AUSA tradeshow. The gallium nitride-powered Active Electronically Scanned Array proposed upgrade to the Patriot(TM) Air and Missile Defense has surpassed more than 1,000 hours of operation in just over a year, which is half the time of a typical testing program.

"We achieved this milestone so quickly because of our successful experience developing and maturing GaN for programs like the U.S. Navy's Air and Missile Defense Radar," said Doug Burgess, director of AESA programs at Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems business. "We're ready to take the next step and get this radar into the hands of our customers."

During the course of the 1,000 hours, Raytheon's GaN-based AESA prototype radar routinely demonstrated 360-degree capability by working together with a second GaN-based AESA antenna that was pointed in a different direction. As targets flew out of one array's field of view and into another, the two arrays seamlessly passed information back and forth, tracking the target continuously. The main array also detected and tracked tactically maneuvering fighter jets and thousands of other aircraft.

"Raytheon's GaN technology is backed by 19 years of research and $300 million in investment, while our competitors are either new to the market or primarily build GaN for commercial applications," said Ralph Acaba vice president of Integrated Air and Missile Defense at Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems business. "When national security is on the line you want highly reliable, proven technology that is certified by the U.S. Department of Defense for use in military radars."

Raytheon's GaN-based AESA radar will work with the Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System and other open architectures. It maintains compatibility with the current Patriot Engagement Control Station and full interoperability with NATO systems.

A number of current and expected future Patriot Air and Missile Defense System partner nations in Europe and Asia have expressed interest in acquiring GaN-based AESA.Poland submitted a Letter of Request for GaN-based AESA Patriot on March 31. Raytheon's GaN-based AESA technology also meets Germany's requirements for the German Taktisches Luftverteidigungssystem, or TLVS, tactical air and missile defence system.
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #324 on: May 28, 2017, 12:32:17 pm »
The Army had awarded Lockheed and others R&D contract under APASS..Not sure if actual test hardware came out (they are still working through it till next year) of it but something that could well be considered for future Patriot (PAC-3) upgrades.

Affordable Active Phased Array Sensor Systems

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It is the Government's intent to award a cost plus fixed fee, five year, indefinite delivery indefinite quantity with task orders type contract for the Affordable Phased Array Sensor System (APASS) Program under the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (USA AMRDEC). The AMRDEC seeks innovative technologies to advance capabilities in applied sensors guidance electronics for Radio Frequency (RF) and Millimeter Wave (MMW) technologies. The objective of this development program is to design, fabricate, and demonstrate an affordable, solid-state, form-factored all-weather Active Electronically Steered Array (AESA)-based seeker with the capability to engage ground targets, cruise missile, UAV, and rotary aircraft threats, and to serve as a building block for radar system development that could serve surveillance or fire control functions.The proposed period of performance is from 28 February 2013 through 27 February 2018. Based upon market research, the Government is not utilizing the policies contained in the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 12. Authority cited: Statutory authority permitting other than full and open competition for the requirement is 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1), as implemented by paragraphs 6.302-1 of the FAR, entitled, "Only One Responsible Source and No Other Supplies or Services Will Satisfy Agency Requirements." This acquisition will be sole source to Lockheed Martin Corporation, 5600 W Sand Lake Rd MP-265, Orlando, FL 32819. Lockheed Martin possesses a unique capability for the specific sensor component design and test requirements involved with this acquisition. Consequently, they are the only source known to the Government at this time that is currently capable of resolving technological problems with sensor system prototypes that may arise during development and testing given their previous successful performance in design, demonstration and development of thermal management techniques. Lockheed Martin is the sole designer and manufacturer of the current prototypes; no other company is known at this time that is capable of performing the unique design, development, integration and test requirements required under this acquisition for phased array sensors of tactical grade quality. Lockheed Martin utilized their own proprietary data/processes to design and develop this emerging technology; therefore, Lockheed Martin is the only source currently capable of providing the specialized design, development, integration and test for continuing development and modifications to this unique and proprietary concept. EXPORT .


IN BRIEF: Lockheed Martin to provide Army with radar sensors for missile guidance


Quote
U.S. Army missile experts needed advanced radar missile seekers for air- and ground-based systems across several frequencies. They found their solution from the Lockheed Martin Corp. Missiles and Fire Control segment in Orlando, Fla. The Army Contracting Command at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., awarded Lockheed Martin an $8.2 million contract for Affordable Phased Array Sensor Systems (APASS) technology for a variety of applications. The APASS Ka-Band Medium Power Development program, sponsored by the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) at Redstone Arsenal, is developing phased-array radar technology for sensors guidance using RF and millimeter wave technologies. The program is developing affordable, solid-state, all-weather active electronically steered array (AESA) radar seekers to enable missiles to attack enemy ground targets, cruise missiles, unman-ned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and helicopters, and to serve as a building block for future radar technologies for surveillance or fire control.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2017, 02:00:55 pm by bring_it_on »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #325 on: May 29, 2017, 08:56:15 am »
A Modified Stunner/Sky-Ceptor?

FY18 - Advanced Missile Demo - Low-cost Extended Range Air Defense



Utilization of a Low Cost Interceptor (LCI) for Cost Effective Air Defense against Low Tech Threats



Quote
III. Threat Set

The emerging threat set is a relatively low cost airborne vehicle or cruise missile with less capability than a sophisticated cruise missile, but just as lethal. Low cost makes it affordable for rouge nations to obtain large quantities and use them against military installations and unsuspecting civilian population centers.

 The threat set consists of relatively unsophisticated airborne vehicles, such as first generation cruise missiles, unmanned air vehicles, and fixed and rotary wing aircraft that have been equipped with simple navigation aids for autonomous delivery of conventional or biological weapons. The following threat types and cases make up 80 to 90 percent of the full threat spectrum and include:

* Reworked/retrofitted anti-ship cruise missiles
* Retrofitted drone type aircraft
* Retrofitted manned aircraft and kit planes
* Patrolling UAVs and UAVs equipped with ordinance

Low Cost Interceptor Development and Design

The development of the LCI has been an iterative and multi-level process that has traded cost, requirements and performance. A system requirements review (SRR) and system and subsystem preliminary design reviews (PDR) in 2002, led to the initial design shown in Figure 2. A key requirement for the missile was the ability to engage targets at ranges in excess of 100 km. Major subcontractors supporting Miltec on this effort included Northrop Grumman Electronics Division (responsible for the seeker), Aerojet Corporation (responsible for the propulsion system) and MPC Products (responsible for the control actuation system).

 Miltec is responsible for the air frame and avionics, as well as integration, assembly and testing. Off the shelf components and existing technologies are incorporated into the design as a cost saving measure whenever possible. Throughout the program, we’ve traded costs against performance to maintain the low cost aspect of the interceptor. Efforts in this early phase included a control actuation system prototype, static fire testing of the solid rocket motor, wind tunnel testing, and the development and testing of avionics testbed.

In August of 2004, USASMDC/ARSTRAT awarded a follow-on contract to the initial BAA, which included a basic and two optional tasks within the contract:

 Basic - Conduct of a Short Hot Launch (SHOTL) Flight Test at Redstone Arsenal
 Option 1 - Conduct of a Critical Design Review (CDR)
 Option 2 - Conduct of a Controlled Vehicle Flight Test

Preparation for the SHOTL Test began in September of 2004, with a scheduled launch in August of 2005 – a period of less than one year. Miltec received a HAWK Launcher as Government Furnished Equipment and developed a design that would replace one of the launcher sections with a rail. A surrogate propulsion unit was selected which replicated the initial launch environment, but facilitated the missile staying within the confined range fans of Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC) Test Area 1. Components for a Ground Test Unit (GTU) and Flight Test Unit (FTU) were procured and using Miltec and RTTC facilities, the two units were integrated, assembled and ground tested. On 3 August 2005, the SHOTL test was successfully conducted, and achieved the primary tests objectives of:

Measuring Induced Missile Tip-off Rates and Launch Data
 Validating the LCI Launcher Design and Mechanical Interface to the Missile
 Establishing and Practicing Miltec IA&T, Range and Launch Procedures
 Demonstrating Program Maturity

In March 2005, while preparations for the SHOTL Flight Test were progressing, Miltec received contractual direction to modify the design of the LCI so that the missile would be capable of launching within the Surfaced Launched Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (SLAMRAAM) architecture. This contractual change, directed by the Commanding General of USASMDC/ARSTRAT, resulted from AMRAAM escalating costs and failure to meet the objective range of the SLAMRAAM requirements. Miltec was directed to take the 10” missile design, capitalize on efforts to date, and redesign the missile to a 7” configuration that fit within the volume and weight constraints of AMRAAM. The resultant design, shown in Figure 3, is currently undergoing subsystem and component tests.

One key outcome of efforts to date has been the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between USASMDC/ARSTRAT and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Eglin Air Force Base for joint development efforts between LCI and the AFRL’s Multimode Advanced Radar Seeker (MARS) Program. The MARS program is using the gimbal and antenna assembly developed and tested under LCI for a 2009 scheduled captive carry flight test (Figure 4). LCI is leveraging from this effort through the MARS procurement of the electronics backend assembly and modifications to the aircraft and flight schedules. Both of these programs have benefitted from the internal research and development (IRAD) funded Northrop Grumman efforts in the Common Miniature Ku/Ka (CMK) program. The seeker is KU band, and the antenna is electronically steered for elevation and mechanically controlled for azimuth.

The 7” design missile has a dual pulse solid rocket motor, with a first pulse that boosts the interceptor to cruise velocity and a second pulse that produces the necessary endgame velocity and acceleration necessary to defeat the threat. LCI also has an innovative clamshell design for the control actuation system (CAS), designed by MPC Products, that allows the CAS to be installed or removed from the interceptor without interference from the rocket motor blast tube.
The program has separate contractor and government cost analysis teams. These teams monitor the efforts, update cost estimating relationships and vendor provided quotes and analyses, and update the cost models on a continuous basis to ensure LCI remains a cost effective missile. There have been several independent reviews of the cost model and LCI remains a viable and, as importantly, affordable missile.
With successful completion of the propulsion system in 2009, the program is on schedule to conduct a controlled vehicle flight test in 2010.

Conclusion:

The LCI will have the ability to intercept relatively unsophisticated cruise missiles, unmanned aerial vehicles, remotely piloted vehicles, drones/decoys, and fixed and rotary wing aircraft, all of which are capable of carrying conventional and weapons of mass destruction warheads. It thus enhances the capability of current and future Air and Missile Defense (AMD) systems to counter the air threat, and provides the AMD commander with another option for the air defense battle. Use of LCI against these unsophisticated threats provides significant munitions cost savings (cost per round, as well as cost per kill), and allows preservation of higher cost, more capable interceptors for more stressing threats.



http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,1921.msg184584.html#msg184584
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 11:18:32 am by bring_it_on »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #326 on: June 24, 2017, 06:03:07 am »
US Army to hold competition for Patriot radar replacement


Quote
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army intends to hold a competition to replace its Patriot air-and-missile defense radar and plans to begin analysis of materiel solutions in fiscal year 2018, according to a service spokesman.

The service has spent years grappling with when and how it will replace its current Raytheon-manufactured Patriot system first fielded in 1982. At one point, the U.S. Army planned to procure Lockheed Martin's Medium Extended Air Defense System as the replacement, but it canceled its plans to acquire the system, opting instead to procure key components of a new Integrated Air and Missile Defense System, or IAMD, separately.

Northrop Grumman is developing the IAMD’s Integrated Battle Command System, the command and control architecture for the system. The U.S. Army also plans to use the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 Missile Segment Enhancement missiles in the future system.

Key to the future system is to have a 360-degree threat detection capability achieved through a new radar. The current radar has blind spots.

The U.S. Army spent the past year trying to decide whether it would simply upgrade Patriot’s radar or replace the sensor outright.

“The Lower-Tier Air-and-Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) program — currently pre-decisional — is planned for a full-and-open competition to deliver the best materiel solution to that meets the U.S. Army requirements,” Army spokesman Dan O’Boyle told Defense News in a statement this week.

The service plans to use a Technology Maturation and Risk Reduction phase, Milestone A, “to develop a mature effort, foster competition, assess industry readiness, reduce programmatic and technical risks, as well as reduce total ownership costs,” he said.

While the program’s timeline has yet to be fully determined, the U.S. Army plans to conduct a formal Milestone A in the fiscal year 2018 time frame, O’Boyle added.

Raytheon and Lockheed Martin have been vocal about a desire to compete for the new IAMD radar, but it’s possible other companies will produce capable offerings.

Both companies swiftly responded to a request for information released in the summer of 2016 asking for possible radar capabilities for a future missile defense system with the sensor expected to reach initial operational capability prior to fiscal year 2028.

The U.S. Army spent some time over the past year conducting a number of industry visits not only to collect data, but to look at technologies as well as manufacturing capabilities and capacities, Col. Rob Rasch, the Army's deputy program executive officer for Army Missiles and Space, told Defense News earlier this year. At the time, he said, the Army was very close to finalizing a strategy for procuring or upgrading a radar. 

Raytheon is expected to promote its Patriot Gallium Nitride (GaN) active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar for the future radar. It unveiled its system at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Global Force Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, in March 2016. Fully built and functioning, Raytheon has been putting the system through its paces in tests since its debut.

Raytheon said, following the RFI release, that it had responded to the request with a comprehensive vision of the next generation of air-and-missile defense radars.

Lockheed is still developing the MEADS system with Germany and Italy after the U.S. dropped out of the program, and its MEADS 360-degree radar could be a contender for the competition, but it is also possible the company brings other capabilities to the table.

The company showcased its new TPY-X GaN-based, digital AESA radar at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, in August 2016, that it plans to bring to market this year for long-range surveillance and search.

And Lockheed recently demonstrated it could bring a new radar to the field within a few years, such as the Q-53 radar, born from urgent operational needs in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Long Range Discrimination Radar in Alaska, which will come online in 2020, and the Air Force’s Space Fence, which will be operationalized in the Kwajalein Atoll by 2019.

For the U.S. Army’s radar replacement, “we think we can deliver the radar pretty darn quick once we understand the requirements and go through the competition. It won’t take the war fighter seven years to get it,” Brad Hicks, Lockheed’s vice president for Mission Systems and Training, said at the time of the RFI’s release. 

What the Army chooses for its future radar could impact future decisions of many foreign countries looking to have air-and-missile defense systems that are interoperable with U.S. forces' equipment. Poland has been in the market for an air-and-missile defense system for many years and has wanted to ensure commonality with the U.S. system and most recently Romania announced it would buy Patriot systems. Meanwhile, Germany would like to see other foreign countries buy into the MEADS solution when it is ready for prime time.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2017, 06:06:56 am by bring_it_on »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #327 on: July 06, 2017, 10:12:29 am »
Memorandum of Intent Between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and the Minister of National Defense of the Republic of Poland Concerning PATRIOT Defense Capabilities

Quote
In his Jetter of June 9, 2017, to Polish Minister of National Defense Antoni Macierewicz,
U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis wrote that the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation
Agency (DSCA) and the U.S. Department of the Army would outline the estimated timeline
for Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Letters of Offer and Acceptance (LOAs) to respond to
Poland's request for procurement of the PATRIOT missile system and other elements of
Poland missile defense.

The U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Defense Exports and Cooperation
outlined a phased approach to meeting Poland's missile defense requirements.
In the spirit of our strong commitment to Poland's defense, deepening defense cooperation,
and support for Poland's urgent need for an air and missile defense capability, the U.S.
Department of Defense (DoD) intends to expeditiously address development and
presentation of LOAs to the Republic of Poland for the PA TRI OT capabilities described
herein. The U.S. DoD also intends to pursue vigorously the integration of the requested
capabilities while adhering to U.S. laws and regulations. In particular, the U.S. DoD is to
comply with all technology release authorities, policy clearances, and Congressional
approvals.

The U.S. DoD intends to pursue the PATRIOT requirement as follows:

Phase I. The U.S. Army intends to deliver an LOA to Poland for the PATRIOT/
Integrated Battle Command System (IBCS) system by December 2017. The U.S. DoD
intends to offer the U.S. Army Configuration that includes four (4) Firing Units of
PATRIOT Configuration 3+ with PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement and the IBCS. The
U.S. DoD is unable to provide current PATRIOT configuration radars for lease or buy-back.
Projected delivery will begin in 2022, and initial operational capability is expected in 2023.

Phase II. Ba~ed on WISLA requirements provided by the Ministry of National
Defense of the Republic of Poland, and as part of a Polish FMS case, the U.S. DoD intends
to pursue, within the statutory and regulatory framework of the Security Cooperation
enterprise, integration of SkyCeptor, 360 degree Active Electronically Scanned Array radar,
and Polish indigenous sensors into the Polish WISLA architecture. The ability of the U.S. DoD to implement this integration effort depends on the receipt of additional technical and
scheduling information from Poland as well as higher release authorities. Delivery of a

Phase II amended LOA is projected by the end of calendar year 2018.
Additionally, the U.S. DoD intends to transfer the maximum level of technology allowable
under U.S. policy, associate-0 with the 69 areas, which includes the 12 critical areas briefed
by the Polish Ministry of National Defense, to be provided formally to the U.S . DoD. These
critical areas include technology associated with a proposed U.S. radar and SkyCeptor
missile.

The Minister of National Defense of the Republic of Poland intends to support purchase,
sustainment, and deployment of the defense capabilities described herein by making
arrangements for a payment method that guarantees funds are received on a timely basis
from the Republic of Poland.

This Memorandum of Intent is not considered legally binding under international Jaw. This
document does not create any authority to perform any work or obligate or create any
binding commitment under the national Jaws of the United States of America or the
Republic of Poland to make or provide any financial or nonfinancial contribution or to
deliver any defense article to or perform any defense service for the other for any purpose.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline jsport

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #328 on: July 06, 2017, 06:25:00 pm »
Thank you BIO for the past two posts. Quite interesting.

Offline JakobS

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Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Reply #329 on: July 11, 2017, 11:40:03 am »
Problems is arising here in Sweden.

CEO of Raytheon Europe have sent a personal letter to our defense minister. The problem is that such a thing is not allowed here. The authority's handles all such things here independently, in this case the Defence Materiel Administration.

It can mean problem if Patriot is chosen as the winner instead of the SAMP/T. The french will then probably appeal the decision, pointing to interference, and the whole procurement will have to be done again from the start.