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Author Topic: ALBM Projects (was: Er, Skybolt, the missile...)  (Read 22167 times)

Offline robunos

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Re: ALBM Projects (was: Er, Skybolt, the missile...)
« Reply #45 on: November 06, 2016, 02:05:48 pm »
Or the question is why fairings along the entire rocket body, and not just on the nose and tail.

Thermal protection?
The carrier aircraft is supersonic, so the missile is going to get 'warm'. By putting the thermal insulation on jettisonable fairings, the missile itself is not encumbered with the added weight. Likewise, the carrier aircraft doesn't need to carry an active thermal control system for the missile...

cheers,
            Robin.
Where ARE the Daleks when you need them......

Offline CJGibson

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Re: ALBM Projects (was: Er, Skybolt, the missile...)
« Reply #46 on: November 06, 2016, 05:10:51 pm »
Didn't the USAF plan to fit Skybolt to the B-58B?

Wouldn't those heat up?

Were they planned to have heat shields?

If Skybolt did heat up when carried externally on a supersonic aircraft, I wonder if that explains the internal carriage on the HS.1011 deterrent carrier?

Would the carrier aircraft (in this discussion the Minerva) be stooging around at subsonic speed poffler-style, then accelerate to launch point?

Would that dash to launch point heat the missile enough to require a heat shield?

Or would the Minerva be on QRA and fly supersonically to its launch point? Wasn't this how the Mirage IV operated?

That long supersonic flight probably would need some thermal protection.

Reminds me of Blue Steel and its four climates.

This could turn into an interesting discussion.

Chris

Offline robunos

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Re: ALBM Projects (was: Er, Skybolt, the missile...)
« Reply #47 on: November 07, 2016, 02:38:13 pm »
I have to say that I have no idea of the mission profile of the Minerva (at least until the book comes out), but from the illustration, it doesn't appear to have the endurance for 'poffling'.
Regarding Skybolt on B-58B, take a look at the PDF presented in reply#31, upthread. It shows the design of the B-52 Skybolt pylon, and there, you'll find a 'Thermo-regulation Unit', to cool the missiles guidance system. So Skybolts were to be actively cooled during airborne carriage.

cheers,
            Robin.
Where ARE the Daleks when you need them......

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: ALBM Projects (was: Er, Skybolt, the missile...)
« Reply #48 on: November 14, 2016, 03:42:39 am »
So I'm almost at the end of Trimble's STRIKE FROM THE SEA. I came upon a reference to BuAer concepts thrown out toward the end of the Seamaster's career meant to show its' versatility.

In May 1957, BuAer proposed launching Regulus II missiles piggyback off the P6M-2 Seamaster. In January 1958, BuAer proposed a 14,000lb, 2-stagehypersonic  boost-glide missile with 1000mi to be carried internally. range. That following Feb, it was also proposed to launch Corvus missiles from the mine bay.

It's the Regulus and BGV concepts that have my attention. Anyone else hear of either of these projects?

The book's cites The BuAer documenst Technical Feasibility and Operational Analysis of P6M-Regulus II Weapon System and A Preliminary Design Study Of an Air-To-Surface, Boost-Glide Missile System for the P6M Aircraft as a references.
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Offline fightingirish

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Re: ALBM Projects (was: Er, Skybolt, the missile...)
« Reply #49 on: November 09, 2017, 10:11:10 am »
Quote from: Ron Downey
History of the GAM-87 Skybolt Missile
History of the GAM-87 Skybolt Air to Surface Ballistic Missile from the Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) Historical Publication Series, No. 67-50-I. Written by Charles G. Worman and dated March 1967. This was a Douglas missile.
PDF:
Click here to download history (13.2 Megs).

Alternate download here.

Source: http://aviationarchives.blogspot.com/2017/11/history-of-gam-87-skybolt-missile.html
Slán,
fightingirish

Slán ist an Irish Gaelic word for Goodbye.  :)