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Author Topic: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)  (Read 1405 times)

Offline sferrin

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US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« on: August 18, 2018, 04:58:50 am »
Just trying to keep them straight.  So we have (pulled from a couple different articles recently posted):

1.  AGM-183A - Air-Launched Rapid Response Weapon (ARRW). "The ARRW, like many of the emerging threats, is an air-launched, rocket-boosted unpowered hypersonic glider. To be developed under a $480 million initial contract, potentially worth $780 million including early production through 2023, the ARRW work is an extension to Lockheed’s pre-existing DARPA contract under which it is building the virtually identical Tactical Boost Glide (TBG) demonstrator."  Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control

2. Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW). The HCSW is a solid-rocket-powered, GPS-guided missile, and is targeted at initial operational capability on existing combat aircraft in fiscal 2022. Lockheed Martin Space Systems

3. Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept (HAWC).  A scramjet-powered missile demonstrator similar in concept to the Air Force Research Laboratory/Boeing X-51A scramjet-powered vehicle that exceeded Mach 5 in a 2013 flight test. Both Lockheed Martin Skunk Works and Raytheon

4. Raytheon, which is partnered with Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (formerly Orbital ATK) on the scramjet for HAWC, is also in final negotiations with DARPA to develop and test a TBG glide demonstrator. Raytheon’s newest work is believed to be supporting DARPA development of a ship-launched TBG for the U.S. Navy. In July, Lockheed was awarded a $40.5 million Navy Hypersonic Booster Technology Development (HBTD) contract, also believed to be related to this effort.

5. Another one of the projects in the Technology Transition Program is the Advanced Full Range Engine (AFRE), which aims to demonstrate a hybrid propulsion system that would utilize a traditional turbine engine and transition to a Dual Mode Ramjet (DMRJ) for hypersonic travel. Ground tests are planned for 2019 or 2020. This is a joint effort between DARPA and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). 

6. The Army and Navy are also working on developing hypersonic capabilities. The Army is working with DARPA on studying a ground-launched capability for hypersonic boost glide weapons through the Operational Fires project. This effort was funded at $6 million in FY18 and $50 million in the FY19 request. Operational Fires will also leverage work done on the Air Force TBG program. The Army was previously conducting work on the Advanced Hypersonic Weapon. A successful flight test was conducted in November 2011, but an August 2014 flight test failed due to a problem with the booster rocket used to launch the glide vehicle.

7. The Navy was tasked with a follow-on test using a downsized hypersonic vehicle. Downsizing provides the Navy with the ability to analyze possible future ship-launched capabilities. The Navy's Strategic Systems Programs office conducted this test in October 2017, dubbed Flight Experiment-1. A rocket carrying the glide vehicle was launched from Hawaii, after which the glide vehicle flew more than 2,000 miles in about 30 minutes. Other details of the test were classified.

8. In addition to the ARRW, HCSW, TBG, and HAWC, Lockheed's "Skunk Works" is believed to still be working on the High Speed Strike Weapon, which sources say is a tactical missile in the Mach 3-plus category that resembles its D-21 drone, which USAF launched from SR-71s and B-52s in the 1970s. The HSSW is derivative of the Revolutionary Approach to Time Critical Long Range Strike program Lockheed explored with the Navy in the early 2000s.  (This sounds more like speculation as they seem to be conflating two different programs.)
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 05:05:19 am by sferrin »
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Offline George Allegrezza

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2018, 08:07:23 am »
Thanks sferrin for pulling this together.  I'd concur with your assessment that the story around item 8 is a bit muddled.

I'd suggest that this be a pinned topic in Missile Projects.  We can then hang links off this to the specific program topics (e.g., ARRW).

I'd also suggest that the Prompt Global Strike topic may have outlived its usefulness, since it's a melange of the original PCGS programs, AHW, manned and unmanned hypersonic air vehicles, the current hypersonic projects mentioned above, and God knows what else.  I'd be happy to opine to a willing moderator how it might be split up when someone has the time and inclination to do so.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 09:40:48 am by George Allegrezza »

Offline seruriermarshal

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2018, 04:52:38 pm »
Navy Tests Hypersonic Glide Vehicle Technology
Published: November 6, 2017 | By Missile Defense Project

On October 30, the U.S. Navy’s Strategic Systems Program (SSP) tested a prototype conventional prompt strike missile with a modified Advanced Hypersonic Weapon (AHW) boost-glide vehicle. The test, titled Intermediate Range Conventional Prompt Strike Flight Experiment-1 (CPS FE-1), was conducted on behalf of the Department of Defense at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii.

“The test collected data on hypersonic boost-glide technologies and test-range performance for long-range atmospheric flight. This data will be used by the Department of Defense to anchor ground testing, modeling, and simulation of hypersonic flight vehicle performance and is applicable to a range of possible Conventional Prompt Strike (CPS) concepts,” said a Pentagon spokesman. SSP director Vice Adm. Terry Benedict called the test, “a monumental achievement.”

If selected for maturation, the CPS missile could be deployed on the future Virginia-class guided-missile submarines (SSGNs), rather than Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines. The Virginia-class subs are expected to be equipped with a Virginia Payload Module to provide the smaller submarine-class additional missile tube capacity.

https://missilethreat.csis.org/navy-tests-hypersonic-glide-vehicle-technology/

Offline bobbymike

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2018, 05:57:49 am »
Thanks sferrin for pulling this together.  I'd concur with your assessment that the story around item 8 is a bit muddled.

I'd suggest that this be a pinned topic in Missile Projects.  We can then hang links off this to the specific program topics (e.g., ARRW).

I'd also suggest that the Prompt Global Strike topic may have outlived its usefulness, since it's a melange of the original PCGS programs, AHW, manned and unmanned hypersonic air vehicles, the current hypersonic projects mentioned above, and God knows what else.  I'd be happy to opine to a willing moderator how it might be split up when someone has the time and inclination to do so.
Or restrict the PGS thread to strategic systems, although there has been a dearth of those stories lately. At this time overcoming the "It looks like an ICBM" may be too big of a political hurdle.
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Offline bobbymike

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2018, 06:27:47 am »
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/08/army-warhead-is-key-to-joint-hypersonics/?utm_campaign=Breaking%20News&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65399115&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_DdVi80xYmrFnk6WDdWLiOatTZ6lEBnR8Uq-W_87o9LUJNuU13EwdE9g5NeXAv8l6TAf-LrruaClWDrf8GOnHqZlua5g&_hsmi=65399115

Quote
ARMY S&T CONFERENCE: The Army is quietly playing a crucial role in the Pentagon’s quest for hypersonic weapons. The service’s modestly named Alternate Re-Entry System is in fact a maneuverable warhead that could end up on Mach 5-plus missiles fired from Air Force bombers and Navy vessels, as well as Army launchers on land — sort of a new non-nuclear triad.
Army photo

It’s all part of Pentagon R&D chief Mike Griffin‘s all-out push to catch up with Russia and China. Both powers are testing hypersonic weapons that could zip through traditional air and missile defenses.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline Trident

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2018, 07:48:42 am »
http://aviationweek.com/combat-aircraft/b-52-readied-intense-hypersonic-weapons-test-and-deployment-role?utm_rid=CPEN1000000230026&utm_campaign=16243&utm_medium=email&elq2=33362d8e2d97424eba2e6634008b3ccd

Quote
The B-52H’s ample wing and external load-carrying capability have contributed to the aircraft’s prominent role in hypersonic testing and, as a result, the bomber’s future is closely tied to the upcoming demonstration and deployment of the U.S. Air Force’s first-generation hypervelocity strike weapons.

With major upgrades underway and reengining planned to sustain the B-52H to 2050, the Air Force intends to retain the long-serving bomber as the mainstay of its long-range strike fleet alongside the new Northrop Grumman B-21s as they are delivered beginning in the late 2020s. In particular, the B-52 is set to play a major role in enhancing standoff capability because rocket-boosted and air-breathing hypersonic weapons will be large, making them a challenging store for internal carriage.

ARRW and HCSW hypersonic B-52 demos to be accelerated under Section 8
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Offline Jeb

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2018, 01:48:26 pm »
I'm curious, is the intent for these hypersonics to be warhead-carrying weapons or straight kinetic-kill vehicles or is it too early in conceptualization to even ask this?

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2018, 03:33:36 am »
DOD eyes Common Hypersonic Glide Body for use across Army, Navy, Air Force


Quote
The Defense Department is laying the groundwork for a new triad of conventional hypersonic strike weapons to arm the military services with a Common Hypersonic Glide Body (C-HGB) paired with rockets tailored to launch from service-specific platforms, a major step toward ushering in a new class of ultrafast, maneuvering weapons across the U.S. military.

After more than a decade of development, Pentagon leaders are ready to harvest technologies matured as part of the Conventional Prompt Strike technology demonstration program by identifying potential applications across the U.S. military -- advancing the longstanding policy goal of giving the president the option to strike a target almost anywhere with a non-nuclear warhead in less than an hour.

"These technology demonstration activities have reached a level of maturity that will allow the development of hypersonic weapons based on the OSD-developed glide body design," according to a Pentagon memo signed by Defense Department leaders on June 28 outlining a collective way forward for hypersonic weapon technology development.

The Office of the Secretary of Defense has spearheaded work on Conventional Prompt Strike, sponsoring a test executed last fall by the Navy of a hypersonic boost glide prototype that flew from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands and was publicly hailed as a success in recent months by senior Pentagon officials.

"They did a brilliant job with it," Michael Griffin, under secretary of defense for research and engineering, said of the October 2017 CPS flight test during an April 18 hearing of the Senate Armed Services emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee. "I mean, I won't quote numbers, but I'll just say that the impact accuracy was quite impressive."


Based on the results of that test -- dubbed Flight Experiment-1 -- the Pentagon is setting up new enterprise-wide bureaucratic structures and processes dedicated to hypersonic weapons.

The existence of the June 28 memorandum of agreement on hypersonic boost glide technology development and its overarching objective was first reported by Inside Defense on July 23. Inside Defense recently reviewed a copy of the 11-page memo, which reveals previously unreported details.

"The Army, Navy, Air Force and [Missile Defense Agency] are considering the development of weapon systems and capabilities based on this design," states the memo. "It is important that the services develop a way to coordinate requirements, technology development schedules and industrial base issues as they pursue their respective development activities, with a goal of maintaining a common glide body design between the services and MDA."

Each service has identified a potential use for the Conventional Prompt Strike developed glide body: the Army, a Long Range Hypersonic Weapon; the Navy, which in fiscal year 2020 will take responsibility for managing the CPS program from OSD, is developing an Intermediate Range Conventional Prompt Strike program; and the Air Force is developing the Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon. MDA, meanwhile, is leading DOD's effort to develop a program of record to defend against maneuvering hypersonic weapons, which includes a need for hypersonic target vehicles to simulate threats.

The memo was signed, in some cases by appointed deputies, by Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering Michael Griffin, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment Ellen Lord, Army Secretary Mark Esper, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson and Missile Defense Agency Director Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves.

The memo calls for the establishment of a Conventional Prompt Strike Common Hypersonic Glide Body -- or CPS C-HGB -- board of directors to "coordinate C-HGB production priorities and oversee service C-HGB activities to develop and insert technology to enhance warfighting capability and reduce weapon cost."

The board is to meet at least every three months and approve production priorities and service roadmaps for technical development along with overseeing many other aspects of the C-HGB effort, according to the memo.

The board is to be chaired by the Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Strategic Forces Command's commanding general until the service declares initial operational capability of its Long Range Hypersonic Weapon. Other membership includes representatives from the OSD research and engineering hypersonics portfolio manager, director of the Navy's strategic systems programs, military deputy to the Air Force acquisition executive, and the MDA director, according to the memo.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 03:35:23 am by bring_it_on »
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Offline sferrin

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2018, 04:42:22 am »
""The Army, Navy, Air Force and [Missile Defense Agency] are considering the development of weapon systems and capabilities based on this design,""

I'll believe it when I see it.  Makes so much sense it almost certainly won't happen. We'll see.

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2018, 06:46:27 am »
https://insidedefense.com/daily-news/air-force-sees-easiest-path-compared-army-navy-fielding-hypersonic-weapon

Quote
NATIONAL HARBOR, MD -- The Air Force believes it has the "easiest path" among the U.S. military to fielding a long-range, maneuvering hypersonic weapon and plans to arm the B-52 bomber with such a conventionally armed weapon as soon as 2020, according to service officials. Air Force leaders revealed new details about the Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW) -- one of two rapid prototyping hypersonic projects -- during the Air Force Association annual conference here, making explicit which aircraft the...

They talk about putting a warhead on an existing booster must have read my comment about this option when I made it about five years ago  ;)
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline sferrin

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2018, 08:35:57 am »
https://insidedefense.com/daily-news/air-force-sees-easiest-path-compared-army-navy-fielding-hypersonic-weapon

Quote
NATIONAL HARBOR, MD -- The Air Force believes it has the "easiest path" among the U.S. military to fielding a long-range, maneuvering hypersonic weapon and plans to arm the B-52 bomber with such a conventionally armed weapon as soon as 2020, according to service officials. Air Force leaders revealed new details about the Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW) -- one of two rapid prototyping hypersonic projects -- during the Air Force Association annual conference here, making explicit which aircraft the...

They talk about putting a warhead on an existing booster must have read my comment about this option when I made it about five years ago  ;)

Air-launched ATACMs/Zombie is what they should be doin'.

https://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,28358.msg296716.html#msg296716

Use the large-expansion nozzle they used on the booster for the X-51 with it.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2018, 08:37:56 am by sferrin »
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: US hypersonic weapons projects. (General)
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2018, 05:11:51 pm »
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown