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Author Topic: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses  (Read 47811 times)

Offline bobbymike

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Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« on: October 09, 2013, 06:15:00 pm »
http://defensetech.org/2013/10/09/video-socom-wants-to-build-an-iron-man-suit/
 
DefenseTech:
 
Special Operation Command wants a suit its operators can wear that features liquid body armor, built-in computers and offers super human strength. Essentially, the Pentagon wants to outfit its special operators in Iron Man suits. Officials from U.S. Special Operation Command issued a formal request to researchers to help them build this suit the military is calling the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit (TALOS). The request comes right from the top — Adm. William McRaven, USSOCOM commander.

Some of America’s top scientists from labs such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology are pitching in on the project. MIT engineers are working on a liquid body armor made of magnetorheological fluids that “transform from liquid to solid in milliseconds when a magnetic field or electrical current is applied,” according to an Army statement. But the liquid body armor is only a portion of the suit. Leaders of the project also want the TALOS to include physiological subsystems that can monitor core body temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, body position and hydration levels. “[The] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armor, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that — a whole bunch of stuff that RDECOM is playing heavily in,” said Lt. Col. Karl Borjes, a Army Reserach, Development and Engineering Command science advisor assigned to SOCOM, in a statement.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2014, 10:45:32 am by bobbymike »
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Offline Avimimus

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2013, 07:52:12 pm »
...which, I assume, has to be affordable, waterproof, cool in summer and warm in winter, easy to maintain in field conditions without engineering support, and able to fit through a hole in a fence. Oh, and it has to be able to operate almost without fuel and be light enough to carry over many kilometres even if it is powered down. :) Yes, I'd be asking anyone for help that I could talk into it...

Should be a very interesting package of technologies.

Offline bobbymike

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Offline Triton

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2014, 10:53:33 am »
 Published on Jun 2, 2013

The US Special Operations Command is looking for revolutionary new gear assisting troops in exceeding human performance in combat. The idea sounds similar to a science fiction tale, but if the command will be successful in its quest -- this time it may be real. The command has posted a Request For Information (RFI) to government research centers, academy and industry, to provide information that could contribute to the evolution of the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS.


Offline Triton

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2014, 11:17:35 am »
"Socom Leads Development of ‘Iron Man’ Suit"
By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Source:
http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=121419

Quote
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31, 2013 – U.S. Special Operations Command is using unprecedented outreach and collaboration to develop what its commander hopes will be revolutionary capabilities: a suit that’s been likened to the one worn by the “Iron Man” movies superhero that offers operators better protection, enhanced performance and improved situational awareness.

The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS, is the vision of Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, Socom’s commander. He challenged industry and defense representatives at a Socom conference in May to come up with the concepts and technologies to make the suit a reality.

Exactly what capabilities the TALOs will deliver is not yet clear, explained Michael Fieldson, Socom’s TALOS project manager. The goal is to provide operators lighter, more efficient full-body ballistics protection and super-human strength. Antennas and computers embedded into the suit will increase the wearer’s situational awareness by providing user-friendly and real-time battlefield information.

Integrated heaters and coolers will regulate the temperature inside the suit. Embedded sensors will monitor the operator’s core body temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, body position and hydration levels. In the event that the operator is wounded, the suit could feasibly start administering the first life-saving oxygen or hemorrhage controls.

Fieldson admitted that the analogy to the suit that the Tony Stark character wore in the “Iron Man” movies may be a bit of a stretch. The TALOS, for example, isn’t expected to fly.

But beyond that, there’s little that Fieldson -- or anyone else at Socom -- is ready to rule out.

In a departure from past practices of introducing new products piecemeal, adding bulk and weight to operators’ kit, the TALOS will be a fully integrated “system of systems,” Fieldson said. To offset the weight of computers, sensors and armor that make up the suit, operators will have an exoskeleton -- a mechanism that carries the brunt of the load.

“The intent is to have this fully integrated system so you can provide the most capability at the lowest impact to the soldier,” Fieldson said. “We think there is some efficiency to be gained if all the equipment is fully integrated as opposed to different components that are simply assembled on the human.”

Keeping the systems and the exoskeleton powered will require more than today’s batteries can deliver. So along with the TALOS technologies, Socom is calling on the scientific and technical community to come up with reliable and portable power sources.

“We are really looking at stretching the bounds of science and technology,” Fieldson said.

That’s led Socom to reach out to partners within DOD as well as industry and academia for help in pushing today’s technological limits.

The command is working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, as well as U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, among other DOD organizations, to tap into projects already underway.

DARPA, for example, is making headway on its Warrior Web project, designed to boost troops’ stamina and carrying capacity without sacrificing speed or agility. The concept includes a lightweight undersuit that would augment the efforts of the wearer’s own muscles.

“Many of the individual technologies currently under development show real promise to reduce injury and fatigue and improve endurance,” said Army Lt. Col. Joseph Hitt, DARPA’s Warrior Web program manager. “Now we’re aiming to combine them -- and hopefully some new ones, too -- into a single system that nearly every soldier could wear and would provide decisive benefits under real-world conditions.”

The Natick lab is busy identifying high-technology armor and mobility technologies with plans to integrate them into a first-generation TALOS system ready for demonstration by the end of June, reported Greg Kanagaki, project engineer for Natick’s Unmanned Equipment and Human Augmentation Systems Team.

Natick personnel also are serving as subject-matter experts for the TALOS project, particularly in the areas of mobility, human performance and thermal management, Kanagaki said.

Meanwhile, officials at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command say their programs have a direct application to TALOS as well.

“[The] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armor, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that -- a whole bunch of stuff that RDECOM is playing heavily in,” said Army Lt. Col. Karl Borjes, the command’s science adviser.

“RDECOM cuts across every aspect making up this combat armor suit,” he said. “It’s advanced armor. It’s communications, antennas. It’s cognitive performance. It’s sensors, miniature-type circuits. That’s all going to fit in here, too.”

Socom has called on the private sector, too, inviting not just its traditional industry partners, but also those who have never before worked with the command, to participate in the TALOS program.

“There is no one industry that can build it,” Socom’s Senior Enlisted Advisor Army Command Sgt. Maj. Chris Faris said during a panel discussion at the command’s MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., headquarters, as reported by the Defense Media Network.

The outreach has generated a lot of interest. Socom’s TALOS planning session this past summer attracted representatives of 80 colleges, 10 universities and four national laboratories. At a demonstration in July, 80 companies demonstrated technologies ranging from advanced body armor, some using liquids that turn solid on impact, to power supplies to exoskeleton mechanisms.

Socom’s goal, Fieldson said, is to have a TALOS prototype within the next year and to have the suit ready for full field testing within five years. That timetable is revolutionary for the military research, development and acquisition world, even for rapid-equipping programs.

As the only combatant command with acquisition authority, Socom is able to accelerate the TALOS project, Fieldson explained. The command’s acquisition executive and research and development staff share a building at MacDill Air Force Base, which he said promotes close collaboration and speedy decision-making.

“We have access that is nontraditional and that absolutely helps us,” Fieldson said. “We can bounce ideas back and forth against the leadership and ensure that what we are doing makes sense … I think that is critical to trying to develop this system within the timeline we are working toward.”

Also, in a departure from traditional development projects, Socom’s Acquisition Center staff established an innovation cell to lead the effort, advised by operators and focused on transforming business processes to solve the extreme integration challenges associated with TALOS.

“Because of the technical challenges and the compressed timeline, we are going to take more ownership on the government side than we typically take,” Fieldson said.

“We are going to go in and make some decisions that we sometimes rely on industry partners to make for us,” he said. “That allows us to reach out to a broader audience. That way, if there is a great idea in some nontraditional organization, we can integrate it” without relying on a commercial company to do so.

“We are really changing the process,” Fieldson said. “And the reason we are doing that is to try to streamline the overall effort and drive down both the cost and the schedule. That way, we get the best possible equipment to our force as quickly as possible.”

Although the TALOS is initially intended for special operators involved in high-risk missions, it has implications for the conventional force as well, Fieldson said.

“We have a long history at Socom of developing things first and then the technology moving out to the broader force,” he said. “We fully expect that to happen with this one as well. I think there will be a lot of spinoff technologies that the broader force will be able to use.”

Meanwhile, McRaven remains the suit’s No. 1 proponent.

“I’m very committed to this,” he told industry representatives at a July planning forum. “I’d like that last operator that we lost to be the last operator we lose in this fight or the fight of the future. And I think we can get there.”

Offline Triton

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Offline MrT

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2014, 04:26:32 pm »
Don't be surprised to see graphene used in body armour in the near future, after all it's going to be used in phone casings towards the end of this year, so maybe not as far fetched as it may initially seem. The first video though, really? There really must be some juveniles in the DoD!

Offline mithril

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2014, 07:53:09 am »
Don't be surprised to see graphene used in body armour in the near future, after all it's going to be used in phone casings towards the end of this year, so maybe not as far fetched as it may initially seem. The first video though, really? There really must be some juveniles in the DoD!


no.. they just know that the public loves Ironman and are trying to exploit the marvel film's popularity for their own ends..

Offline bobbymike

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Offline Kadija_Man

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2014, 02:21:24 am »
Until they substantially increase power concentrations in batteries or decrease the weight and increase the power output from generators, this sort of thing won't get out of the Lab IMHO.

Offline jsport

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2014, 05:49:29 am »
Until they substantially increase power concentrations in batteries or decrease the weight and increase the power output from generators, this sort of thing won't get out of the Lab IMHO.
would challenge anyone to say you are incorrect.. The problems are even much larger. Athough there is a wave of research and many competitive concepts, there appears no hint that, realizable and worth the resource dismount augmentation etc. would require a Manhattan Project size endeavor encompassing multiple types of layers and systems. One early focus we don't hear enough about is, whole body systems absolute need to absorb impulse pressures.

Offline bobbymike

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Offline jsport

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Offline Avimimus

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #13 on: February 13, 2014, 07:45:20 am »
Until they substantially increase power concentrations in batteries or decrease the weight and increase the power output from generators, this sort of thing won't get out of the Lab IMHO.

What we might see is some kind of energy recovery / active-assistance system for long marches. By reducing the effective load on the soldier, you can probably double marching speeds (or backpack weights). This would allow a special-operations team to carry a lot of additional supplies (e.g. guided mortar rounds) further faster and with greater autonomy. Current technologies could theoretically do this (some calculations with miniature turbine power, active energy recovery pistons, or even diesels show favourable ratios).

Of course, you'd want to be able quickly shed the suit when in combat. You'd have to be able to walk long distances in rough terrain comfortably and reliability will also be an issue.

I figure we might see some type of augmented system for rough terrain work by mid century.

Offline jsport

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2014, 09:29:23 am »
Conventional fuel options are generally don't complement circa 2020 pwr requirements.. a dismount augmentation   strategy's pwr requirement including sought lethality/full spectrum defense etc. isn't there w/o a Manhattan Project size endeavor. When a full capability is realized it may be used for raids only and not be "shedable" during operations for instance. ..guided mortars for instance are too large for small tm independance..Many many issues.

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2014, 10:15:46 am »
McRaven mentions 'protection to survive coming through the door' I wonder if there is some major advance in body armor for this suit as well that maybe will help Spec Ops soldiers without the need for the 'powered' part to come to fruition which may takes much longer to develop.
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Offline jsport

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2014, 06:20:36 pm »
An unpowered conformal body layer may well be the first development priority, as how bodies fit/interface to the subsequent hard layers may one of the largest issues.  Likewise conformal's capability needs to be maximized before hard exos are introduced.

Offline bobbymike

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Offline bobbymike

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Offline jsport

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2014, 04:25:46 am »
Thank you for posting this historically telling story bobbymike.

Offline bobbymike

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #22 on: May 22, 2014, 11:14:52 am »
I modified the title if others want to post articles related not just to TALOS but any advanced technology for the foot soldier.
 
http://breakingdefense.com/2014/05/darpas-wearable-display-augments-reality-for-foot-troops/
 
 
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2014, 09:22:26 am »
I modified the title if others want to post articles related not just to TALOS but any advanced technology for the foot soldier.
 
http://breakingdefense.com/2014/05/darpas-wearable-display-augments-reality-for-foot-troops/
Is this thread  just for American kit BM?

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2014, 10:44:57 am »
I modified the title if others want to post articles related not just to TALOS but any advanced technology for the foot soldier.
 
http://breakingdefense.com/2014/05/darpas-wearable-display-augments-reality-for-foot-troops/
Is this thread  just for American kit BM?

Wasn't my intent to exclude anything so I think any information related to future soldier technology can find a home here.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline bobbymike

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Offline bobbymike

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Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2014, 06:12:34 pm »
This is the Franco-Swiss RB-3D lower body exo skeleton mounted with ballistic armour etc at this year Eurosatory mil expo

Looks awkward as hell  :o


Offline DrRansom

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2014, 08:50:03 pm »
Instead of trying to get exosuits to work in combat, how about using them first for engineers / support personal? Should be an easier first step.


Offline Avimimus

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2014, 07:32:11 am »
What I see as logical first steps:

1) Energy recovery boots/leg attachments to allow dismounted infantry to carry heavier packs longer distances at speed (but discarded in combat).

2) Body armour that is light weight and flexible enough that you can crawl through fences.

3) Incorporating anti-sniper sensors (acoustic and flash detection) in helmets.

So, I'd fund three-separate programs rather than paying for expensive concept art.

Offline Dragon029

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #30 on: June 18, 2014, 08:06:33 am »
1) Is probably better served with regular exoskeleton technology, as the only methods that can provide sufficient energy recovery require notable extra weight or would further interfere with a soldier's gait, which will lead to foot injuries far quicker (the exoskeleton in the first place may cause issues with that, but if you're using some extra soft mechanism in the soles of the boot, that's likely going to cause extra friction for the foot and lead to quick-appearing blisters).

2) Lightweight and flexible armour is great, but I hope you were using crawling through fences as an indicator, not an intended purpose (that kind of action would be very rare; your fences are either (practically) non-existent or impenetrable to a human with or without armour).

3) Is something is something I'm really surprised doesn't exist; flash detection maybe not, but there already exists a few systems that can fairly accurately predict sources of fire through acoustics. Integrate it into a streamline helmet attachment and put hydrophobic coatings over the microphones and I don't see why it couldn't be put into service today (general infantry might be a bit irresponsible with the equipment, but just like M203's or M249's, you don't need every soldier to carry one.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #31 on: June 18, 2014, 12:57:44 pm »



Quote
The Prowler, is Revision’s Human Augmentation device.  It increases a soldiers metabolic reserve while preventing short and long term injuries.  The Prowler allows our soldiers to be more lethal on the objective while increasing deployability through reduced injury.  The Prowler, has been tested by SOCOM and CANSOFCOM, and is under contract with the US Army Labs Natick.  Shown to provide a 33% mechanical advantage, the Prowler proves to be the next human augmentation system.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #32 on: June 18, 2014, 01:12:37 pm »
More images of the Prowler from the other company involved, B-Temia (they actually manufacture it not Revision).

http://www.b-temia.com










Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #33 on: June 18, 2014, 01:13:16 pm »

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #34 on: June 23, 2014, 04:25:31 pm »
I hope this fits the criteria for the thread?



Russian army "future soldier" stuff.
Google translation
 
Quote
Soon the Russian army will receive a new generation combat gear.  Now she is going through a cycle of military trials in different climatic zones.  To supplying the formations and units of the new Ministry of Defense outfit was dedicated to a special meeting, chaired by Deputy Prime Minister and MIC chairman Dmitry Rogozin.
 The meeting was held in Moscow Klimovsk based TSNIITOCHMASH - leading research institute for the development of small arms and remedies for the Armed Forces and the various law enforcement agencies.  It was attended by almost all the heads of the leading designers and national defense related occupational with the manufacture of small arms, ammunition and personal protective equipment.
 Dmitry Rogozin said that "attention given to this issue at different levels can be easily explained, since the use of military equipment is being addressed the vast majority of combat missions in local conflicts, and special counter-terrorist operations."
 Indeed, there are times when, for example, motostrelok went into battle, at best, a bulletproof vest, and even without it in the past.  Outfit of the modern soldier makes him look like a cyborg fiction.  The soldier is not just a shooter, but a full-fledged combat unit with good protection and individual controls.  Fighting equipment includes functionally and structurally linked, elements of five major systems: the defeat, defense, intelligence and control, life support, and even energy.



In addition to equipment, developed in the interests of the Defense Ministry, Dmitry Rogozin shown and the one that is produced to protect the anti-terrorism special forces soldiers.  This "Centurion", "Sherpa", "Legionnaire", "Gladiator".  According to the developers, it is much better that that is used by the similar units abroad.

 


rest at the link
http://www.rg.ru/2014/03/14/soveshanie-site.html
















Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #35 on: June 23, 2014, 04:29:51 pm »
More pics..










Offline ouroboros

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #36 on: June 28, 2014, 06:23:49 pm »
I hope this fits the criteria for the thread?



Russian army "future soldier" stuff.




Wow, starting to look like something straight out of a video game...

The velcro on the front of the handshield so you can temporarily stick it onto velcroed areas of a uniform/armor to free your hands is a nice touch (assuming no unit badge was supposed to be there). There seemed to be a lot of velcro on the overall suit, much more than needed for unit badges and such.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #37 on: July 05, 2014, 02:00:23 pm »
Pics of the Polish armys project "Tytan" protypes future soldier ensembles.











Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #38 on: July 05, 2014, 02:11:22 pm »
More pics

















Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #39 on: July 05, 2014, 02:35:26 pm »
Quote
Poland orders Tytan soldier system
 
 Remigiusz Wilk, Warsaw - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
 
 27 June 2014
 
 
  Polish Army Tytan future soldier system. Source: PHO
 
 The Polish Armament Inspectorate signed two contracts on 27 June for the Tytan (Titan) future soldier system worth more than USD1.5 billion.
 
 Under a framework agreement, the Polish Ministry of Defence (MoD) will finance research and development for the 27 different subcomponents within Tytan, and will retain intellectual rights over the system.
 
 The framework agreement also guarantees that the companies involved in the development of the Tytan system will receive an order for at least 14,000 equipment sets between 2018 and 2022. This values the framework agreement at about PLN5 billion (USD1.63 billion), and doesn't include some of the Tytan subcomponent developments, such as the MSBS-5.56 modular firearms family, that are financed independently from the Tytan programme.
 
 The second agreement completes negotiations between the 13 different organisations involved in the Tytan programme. These are: PCO, Polish Defence Holding (PHO), Bumar Elektronika, FB Lucznik, PSO Maskpol, WB Electronics, WAT, MESKO, ZM Dezamet, WIML, WIHE, RADMOR, and ZM Tarnow.
 
 Speaking following the contract signings, Deputy Defence Minister Czeslaw Mroczek said: "The Polish industry has given a long-term contract for couple of billions zlotys, which gives Polish industry solid base for long-standing existence.
 
 "The agreement gives industry the guarantee to keep the Tytan programme running even if the government changes in next election." According to Mroczek, the MoD is also keen to support potential export sales of the Tytan system.
 
 The first phase of the project will see the creation and integration of the 27 different parts of the Tytan soldier system. These include five different subsystem sets: C4I; observation and reconnaissance (including various weapon sights); armament and ammunition; clothing; ballistic protection; and nuclear, biological, and chemical protection. A new camouflage pattern for the Polish Army will also be developed.
 
 The first phase of research and development will conclude in 2015, and will be followed by a test and qualification phase running until 2017. The first low-rate initial production Tytan sets will be tested by the 17 Mechanized Brigade from Miedzyrzecz. when this has been completed, serial production is scheduled to start in 2018.

Offline Triton

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #40 on: July 05, 2014, 06:20:28 pm »
"U.S. Military Turns to Hollywood to Outfit the Soldier of the Future"
Designer of 'Iron Man' Suit Among Those Working on High-Tech Gear for Elite Troops

by Dion Nissenbaum

Source:
http://online.wsj.com/articles/u-s-military-turns-to-hollywood-to-outfit-the-soldier-of-the-future-1404527893

Quote
SAN FERNANDO, Calif.—The Oscar-nominated designers at Legacy Effects have outfitted such memorable movie warriors as The Terminator, RoboCop, Captain America and Iron Man.

The special-effects company is now at work on what seems a mission impossible: Building an Iron Man-style suit to protect and propel elite U.S. troops by encasing them in body armor equipped with an agile exoskeleton to enable troops to carry hundreds of pounds of gear.

The 3-D printers that once churned out parts for actor Robert Downey Jr.'s red and gold movie armor are making pieces for a Pentagon prototype. Military officials recently examined three designs, an early step in a project by the U.S. Special Operations Command to create a new generation of protective armor within the next four years.

"We are trying to be revolutionary," said Mike Fieldson, the military's manager of the project known as TALOS, the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit.

Joining the quest is a far-flung team of bioengineers, combat veterans, tech experts and a Canadian researcher seeking solutions from the secrets of insect armor. The companies include prop makers, small tech firms and such defense titans as Raytheon Co. RTN +0.81% , Lockheed Martin Corp. LMT +0.58% and General Dynamics. GD +0.45%

The suit could change the way the U.S. military fights wars. For years, American forces have worked to shed pounds from the load they carried through the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan—more than 125 pounds on some missions, including weapons, electronics and body armor.

Developers of the Iron Man suit say it could weigh as much as 400 pounds, requiring a powered exoskeleton to move the armored troops with speed and agility. The problem is existing exoskeletons can't do the job.

"Hollywood has definitely made the Iron Man suit impossibly thin, impossibly light, impossibly agile and impossibly energy efficient," said Russ Angold, co-founder of Ekso Bionics, a Richmond, Calif., company that primarily designs exoskeletons for medical use. "So we're really trying to solve the problem and ask the question: What would Iron Man look like if it was real?"

This isn't the Pentagon's first crack at a futuristic combat suit. The military has spent tens of millions of dollars over the years on prototypes that didn't work as planned. Past failings have raised concerns among lawmakers about the year-old initiative.

Special Operations Command has so far spent about $10 million. Since it isn't an official Pentagon program, there is no fixed budget. That worries some lawmakers, and the House Armed Services Committee recently asked for a briefing to make sure the project doesn't waste money.

"You can see the long-term vision but, for now, much of it remains in the realm of science fiction and entertainment," said Peter Singer, a senior fellow with the New America Foundation's Future of War project. "There's a long way to go, but the technical barriers are not insurmountable."

One of the biggest hurdles is power. Iron Man's fictional defense contractor Tony Stark developed the mini "arc reactor"—worn in his chest—to power the suit. There is no real-world equivalent, and project developers joke about it.

"Iron Man got it right: It's all about the arc reactor," Mr. Angold said. "If someone can come up with that it would be fantastic."

Mr. Angold and his team work in a converted red brick Ford Motor Co. factory that made tanks during World War II. The office has the feel of a tech startup, with high ceilings, open workspaces and a pool table. Bulky exoskeletons designed in partnership with Lockheed Martin hang on a rack, next to cardboard boxes of junked knee braces, helmets, shoulder pads, boots and hinges from early Iron Man suit designs.

Pentagon researchers estimate they need 365 pounds of batteries to power the kind of suit developers have in mind. Researchers are looking at a small engine, designed for drones, as a substitute.

The vexing power problem has prompted the military to ask a Canadian researcher to develop an unpowered exoskeleton alternative. To help solve the dilemma, the Canadian team is studying sumo wrestlers to figure out how 600-pound men can move so deftly.

"This is a new frontier," said Alain Bujold, founder of Mawashi Protective Clothing Inc., a Quebec company that has developed exoskeletons and protective suits by studying creatures with hard shells—insects, lobsters and armadillos.

If developers can build a functional suit, it will "change the way that the operator does business—and probably not in a small way," said one member of U.S. Special Operations Command involved in the program.

The prototypes are designed for three members of Special Operations Forces who are taking part in the testing. The teams have taken computerized body scans and developed mannequins of the men to tailor the suits.

"If we don't do something to help our soldiers they are going to continue to break," said David Audet, an Army official who has spent years overseeing innovative technology programs at the Natick Soldier Research, Development & Engineering Center in Massachusetts. "We're asking them to carry loads that are just absurd."

In May, Mr. Audet traveled to a small Vermont dairy farm to meet Iron Man suit developers as they put one of the early designs through its paces at a rudimentary shooting range set up away from the milking barns.

The daylong tests offered a sobering check. A U.S. soldier trying out the suit had trouble running, diving and shooting with the metal exoskeleton strapped to his legs. And that was before he added the cooling system and other advanced components still to come.

"Will you ever have an Iron Man? I don't know," said Brian Dowling, a former Green Beret overseeing the project for Revision Military in Vermont. "But you'll have some greatly improved technology along the way."

Developers working on new suits for U.S. troops have studied Hollywood creations, along with Medieval armor, above. Chelsea Hamashin/U.S. Special Operations Command

The tipping point for the development program came in December 2012, officials said, when members of the SEAL Team Six converged on a compound in eastern Afghanistan to free a Colorado doctor held hostage by militants.

As commandos stormed the compound, and freed the doctor, one SEAL was shot and killed. Afterward, Adm. William McRaven, the head of U.S. Special Operations Command who oversaw the SEAL Team Six raid in Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden in 2011, decided his forces needed better protection.

"It was one of those incidents where we stepped back and asked, 'What's our long-term vision?' " said James "Hondo" Geurts, the Pentagon official who oversees acquisition programs for Adm. McRaven. "We've done about all we can with our current approach. Is it time to take a bold leap ahead?"

The military has embraced the superhero imagery in its pursuit of the Iron Man suit. The first video to promote the program showed bullets bouncing off an animated Iron Man soldier as he burst through a locked door.

President Barack Obama even invoked the movie hero to a White House audience in February. "I am here to announce that we are building Iron Man," Mr. Obama joked, while promoting innovative technology programs. "This has been a secret project we've been working on for a long time. Not really. Maybe. It's classified."

As the project advanced, Mr. Angold invited the people who made the original Iron Man suits to join. If Legacy could design functional suits for the movies, he figured, maybe they could do it for the military.

"When you're doing something for a movie it is all make-believe," said Lindsay MacGowan, one of Legacy Effects' founders. Computer-generated special effects take care of the suit's imagined technology, like flying, for instance. "Whereas, for the military," he said, "that's really not going to be the case."

In early May, as the deadline for the first prototypes neared, the U.S. Special Operations Command took over a private warehouse on the edge of a St. Petersburg lagoon, not far from the command's Tampa headquarters. The walls are covered with inspirational storyboard illustrations of soldiers diving from planes in winged suits.

U.S. Special Operations Command is trying to fast-track development by sidestepping traditional contracting rules that can bog down projects in years of proposals, testing and evaluation. They have filled the warehouse with scores of developers divided into teams.

Prop makers use foam helmets and chest plates to test suit designs to see what works. A team led by a onetime Houston Astros player, Brad Chedister, is analyzing the widely criticized Under Armour body suit designed for U.S. Olympic speed skaters for its insulating properties. Another group is seeing if the drone engine can really power a commando in a heavy, armored suit.

One researcher, whose pastime is Renaissance-era sword fights, donated medieval suits of armor for developers to study.

The prototype suits are unlikely to look as good as anything on the big screen, designers say.

"This one won't be flying anytime soon, and it won't be red or gold, but it will be something that is in the history books," Mr. MacGowan said.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2014, 06:48:26 pm by Triton »

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #41 on: July 06, 2014, 02:24:23 pm »
This is the Franco-Swiss RB-3D lower body exo skeleton mounted with ballistic armour etc at this year Eurosatory mil expo

Looks awkward as hell  :o

video of it "in action"....


Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2014, 02:53:59 pm »
This is the Franco-Swiss RB-3D lower body exo skeleton mounted with ballistic armour etc at this year Eurosatory mil expo

Looks awkward as hell  :o

video of it "in action"....


Until they mount a Dillon Aero minigun I'm not interested  ;D

http://www.special-ops.org/heads-up-at-natick-for-better-helmets/
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Offline lastdingo

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #43 on: July 06, 2014, 04:38:35 pm »
(...)

About those photos of helmets:

A German experimental archaelogist has done experiments with recovered Roman face masks.
They were made for looks, but turned out to offer significant protection as well.

The eye openings were tiny, but unlike many medieval helmets with tiny vision slits these ancient masks were fitting tight and had the slits close to the eyes. The field of view was actually satisfactory.


So IF almost no transparent material shall be used for a face mask, the way to go in regard to field of view is to make the vision ports very close to the eyes.
Those photos show helmets which violate this basic, geometry-driven, rule.

Offline Dragon029

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #44 on: July 06, 2014, 10:11:24 pm »
The problem with that however is that you run into 2 issues:

1. Helmets are not rigidly attached to the head, and so impacts could mean damaging the eyes (by having the visor move back into the eyes).

2. To have the helmet still accommodate the nose, jaw and ears, as well as systems like hearing protection, cooling, telephony, vision augmentation systems, etc you would need to make the eyes a local minimum, or effectively, bullet traps.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #45 on: July 09, 2014, 12:43:29 pm »
Quote
Israeli ground forces are getting more help from above. First it was UAS and now the idea is to equip almost every fighter with a personal hovering system.
 
 Rafael has unveiled a small tactical intelligence gathering hovering system. The plan is to equip many of the soldiers in an infantry unit with the micro hovering system that will serve as “eyes over the hill”. The “Maoz” is carried in a small canister stowed in the personal gear of an infantry soldier. After mission completion it can be returned to the canister for further use.
 
 Rafael sources say that a soldier can carry a number of these hovering systems in his personal gear , together with a small control unit. The company says that the operation is very easy and according to the Israeli company the “Maoz” can hover for 15 minutes and can be operated after battery replacement for 50 hours without maintenance.
 
 The micro system can hover to a distance of 1 km from its operator in an urban area and 5 km in an open one. Hovering altitude is 100 meters in an open area and 50 in an urban one. Rafael plans to equip the micro system with a day CCCD camera and with a special night vision sensor.
 
 The Israeli company says that the system has very impressive capabilities for this type of hovering system – a detection of a person from a range of 180 meters, recognizing him at a 60 meters range and incriminating him at a range of 30 meters,vehicles can be detected at a range of 400 meters and recognized at a range of 60 meters.

 http://i-hls.com/2014/06/new-israeli...vering-system/





Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #46 on: July 11, 2014, 06:08:14 pm »

Quote
(DARPA) EXACTO Demonstrates First-Ever Guided .50-Caliber Bullets   
    DARPA’s Extreme Accuracy Tasked Ordnance (EXACTO) program recently conducted the first successful live-fire tests demonstrating in-flight guidance of .50-caliber bullets. This video shows EXACTO rounds maneuvering in flight to hit targets that are offset from where the sniper rifle is aimed. EXACTO’s specially designed ammunition and real-time optical guidance system help track and direct projectiles to their targets by compensating for weather, wind, target movement and other factors that could impede successful hits.
 The EXACTO program is developing new approaches and advanced capabilities to improve the range and accuracy of sniper systems beyond the current state of the art. For more information, please
visit the program page.   Rest at the link

http://www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Rele...medium=twitter

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #47 on: July 11, 2014, 06:15:15 pm »
Helmet for TALOS?

http://gizmodo.com/the-armys-new-helmet-design-comes-with-built-in-a-c-1575643048
Quote
HSD recently completed a multi-year collaboration with the US Army RDECOM Laboratory’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center to develop a Next Generation Respiratory Protection System (NGRPS).
The NGRPS concept is an integrated headgear solution which uses scalable protection for the future warfighter.
The system allows scalable protection ranging from Air-Purifing Respirator (APR), Powered Air-Purifing Respirator (PAPR), and Closed-Circuit Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (CC SCBA) modes or operation.
The NGRPS provides an integrated headgear solution that allows for operational tailoring and does not require helmet removal for donning. The system includes a CB liner system that integrates the mounting of the ballistic helmet shell and CB Mask system allowing for a completely sealed environment.
http://hs-design.com/hsDNA/2014/01/next-generation-respiratory-protection-system/






Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #48 on: July 11, 2014, 06:27:27 pm »
Reminds me of the helmet and breather worn by the geno soldiers from the movie "Soldier" ;D





Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #49 on: July 14, 2014, 04:35:40 pm »
Quote


    Patrick Tucker  June 25, 2014
    The Military Is About to Get New Spy Glasses   
Getting secret information to specific people, like the location of the nearest nuclear power plant, in a way that doesn’t draw attention from outside is a classic spy problem. Another one is giving agents the ability to match names to faces in the real world, at blackjack tables and fancy soirees and other places spies frequent. The Defense Department is buying some new spy specs to give spooks in the field an intelligence edge over everybody else.
  Author Patrick Tucker is technology editor for Defense One. He’s also the author of The Naked Future: What Happens in a World That Anticipates Your Every Move? (Current, 2014). Previously, Tucker was deputy editor for The Futurist, where he served for nine years. Tucker's writing on emerging technology ... Full Bio
  The glasses, called simply the X6, are from San Francisco-based Osterhout Design Group. They look like the lovechild of Google Glass and the Oculus Rift, providing more information to the wearer than the small window on Google’s much-maligned headset but not obstructing vision like the Oculus Rift. (Admittedly, for spy glasses, they lack a certain subtlety.)At a recent innovation symposium at Defense Intelligence Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., Bobby King, vice president of special projects for Osterhout, demonstrated how the headset provides situational intelligence.  Defense One looked through the glasses at a static, two-dimensional map and suddenly structures appeared in three dimensions related to objects of interest. King confirmed that the map was just a regular print of a satellite photograph. With that particular app, the glasses send information to a server that then processes the image against others to determine the location depicted. The glasses then present data from the database visually in the form of structures, special instructions, clues, etc. The view was smarter and more useful than what you would see with Google Glass, but didn’t get in the way of the user’s ability to actually see, like a clunky virtual reality headset.
“Augmented reality is the fusion of data and your real environment. We’re looking for an immersive feeling, but not virtual,” King said.
Cool map data aren’t the only secret messages you can receive on the X6. Previous reports have hinted at how the glasses might be useful for gaming and training as well. It’s one reason why Microsoft reportedly inked an intellectual property deal with the company for about $150 million earlier this year. The military and intelligence capabilities are a bit more interesting than its relevance as a gaming platform.
Ever been to a gathering where you saw someone’s face but you couldn’t remember her name or why she was important? It’s not just a cocktail party problem but a national security one. A year old startup form Australia called Imagus, has developed a program for the X6 that fixes the problem.Peering through the glasses at a poster of faces while wearing the X6, a tester using the Imagus facial recognition app sees a pair of small circles appear on the eyes of the various targets and then a quick match showed up in the view as demonstrated in a somewhat unnerving video from General Dynamics Information Technology, GDIT, highlights the “dynamic environment of non-cooperative facial recognition.” The Imagus app can match a face in real time to one in a database at a resolution of just twelve pixels between the eyes according to lead software engineer Steve Brain. (Anything under sixty is considered very good in the facial recognition world.) The size of the headset seems to help with targeting the camera to improve speed and accuracy. The glasses could be modified to connect to a military biometrics databases such as BEWL, King confirmed.
GDIT is working with Osterhout, Imagus and other small companies to develop a host of apps and programs around the X6 platform.
“What they want with the glasses is to bring in a lot of different applications. Facial recognition technologies from images is just one example,” Lynn Schnurr, vice president at General Dynamics Information Technology, told Defense One. The Defense Department has purchased 500 beta units of the glasses according to King. Unfortunately, the government’s spy specs are not for you. “It’s not yet commercially available, but for the government, yes.

http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2014/06/military-about-get-new-spy-glasses/87292/

Offline VH

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #50 on: July 16, 2014, 11:40:55 am »
Nearly 40 years ago the soldier named Quarlo worn this combat system

Offline bobbymike

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Offline DrRansom

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #52 on: August 27, 2014, 04:52:12 pm »
Other use for Exo-suits:
http://defensetech.org/2014/08/22/navy-uses-exoskeletons-for-shipyard-maintenance/#more-23540

US Navy is exploring using Exo-skeletons for shipboard tools like Riveters and Sanders. Increases productivity by decreasing working fatigue dramatically.

Saw another story about exo-skeletons being used in a South Korean shipyard.

One use for exo-skeleton would be logistics and engineer troops, may speed supply and construction tasks.

Offline bobbymike

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Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #54 on: September 14, 2014, 12:03:23 am »
Quote

The average spider can stay perched in a web for long hours waiting for prey and can lift eight times its own body weight. The average soldier – cannot. The military is trying to change that with help from scientists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, called on to develop a so-called “Soft Exosuit.” The suit would imbue the wearer with what might be called “super” endurance and lifting ability. It may sounds like the “Iron Man” suit the military’s already tinkering with, but this Spidey suit would be constructed mostly of an experimental textile material in a scientifically-designed “web” pattern, rather than a bunch of hydraulic pumps and metal.
It would have a small low-energy microprocessor but wouldn’t need an enormous battery pack for operation. The prototype even comes equipped with Spidey sense in the form of a “network of supple strain sensors that act as the ‘brain’ and ‘nervous system’ of the Soft Exo-suit, respectively — continuously monitoring various data signals, including the suit tension, the position of the wearer (e.g., walking, running, crouched), and more.”
rest at the link
http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2014/09/military-just-asked-harvard-make-them-spiderman-suit/93905/

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #55 on: September 14, 2014, 12:07:03 am »
Link to a video of the Harvard suit.


Offline fightingirish

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Slán,
fightingirish

Slán ist an Irish Gaelic word for Goodbye.  :)

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McDonnell Douglas Model 225 painting by "The Artist" Michael Burke (Tavush) 2018, found at deviantart.com and at Secret Projects Forum » Research Topics » User Artwork » McDonnell Douglas Model 225 Painting

Offline bobbymike

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Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #59 on: October 06, 2014, 09:05:13 pm »
Quote
Military Wants Next Generation Night Vision Goggles
Quote
The military’s top research laboratory wants to replace its standard issue night vision goggles with a lighter more powerful version.
The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) said today’s night vision goggles are too heavy and cumbersome for troops and have led to short term and long term neck injuries.
DARPA officials have put out a call to companies to issue proposals to build the next generation of night vision goggles. Proposals must put forth a plan to design goggles that look a lot like a bulky pair commercial sunglasses. The night vision glasses must be able to instantly switch from daylight to infrared.
Military leaders worry that soldiers and Marines don’t have the same advantage they once did in the night as more armies and fighters get access to commercial night vision goggles. DARPA made a point to highlight the development of devices like Goggle glasses that allow for instantaneous mobile computing.



Quote
U.S. Special Operations Command will serve as the acquisition agency for the program. Below is a wish list that DARPA put forth for what it expects from the next generation NVGs:
  • Form Factor and Appearance that blends with commercial sunglasses/eyewear, coverage of both eyes preferable
  • Volume less than or equal to twice that of commercial sunglasses/eyewear
  • Weight less than current visual augmentation systems
  • Power greater than 24 hours run time on one charge, with power source included in weight metric
  • Cost of less than $5000 in volume of 1000 or more
  • Visual Acuity of Snellen 20/20 at clear starlight to direct day sun over 90-degree vertical and 120-degree horizontal feld of view (FOV)
  • Low latency (photon in to receipt by eye) of less than or equal to 2ms
  • Supports interface with tactical computing elements and communications systems, to include the transmission of sound and video to other team members
  • 6 Axis Inertial Measurement Unit, Compass, GPS
  • Interoperable external data and power interfaces
  • Withstand Military Specifications for environmental, EMI, and ballistics

Rest at the dubly do.
http://kitup.military.com/2014/09/military-generation-night-vision.html

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Offline bobbymike

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Offline jsport

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #62 on: October 23, 2014, 09:00:25 am »
Talos made the Sen Tom Coburn 2014 Waste book. Only 80m has been dedicated for the next five years and the report claims requires at least 1B.
As stated in earlier posts Talos requires a Manhattan Project like effort.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #63 on: November 13, 2014, 03:18:33 pm »
Chinese PLA exoskeleton prototype.








Offline ouroboros

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #64 on: November 14, 2014, 09:31:54 pm »
Probably convergent design solutions, but that chinese exoskeleton leg brace style is very similar to the HULC prototypes.

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #65 on: November 15, 2014, 05:21:37 am »
Probably convergent design solutions, but that chinese exoskeleton leg brace style is very similar to the HULC prototypes.

I like it, PLA Office of Convergent Design Solutions..............AKA Hacking and thieving defense/industrial secrets. "Hey look at the similarities of the J-31 and the F-35", "Yes the design 'conveniently converged'"   :o
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Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #66 on: November 15, 2014, 08:45:03 am »
There is a video (which I can't seem to get to embed here  >:( ) of the Chinese exosuit in "action" along with some information...including the plan for an IOC in 2016 ::)

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #67 on: November 15, 2014, 08:47:22 am »
It's a pity this thread is strictly military kit only, most of the exoskeletons we have ongoing in Europe are civvie projects  :(

Including a rather impressive one from Italy.

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #68 on: November 15, 2014, 11:25:06 am »
It's a pity this thread is strictly military kit only, most of the exoskeletons we have ongoing in Europe are civvie projects  :(

Including a rather impressive one from Italy.

They more than likely have a military use so  would still post here for member interest.
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Offline ouroboros

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #69 on: November 21, 2014, 09:11:02 pm »
Japanese civil exoskeleton work has been coming along in various incarnations since Cyberdyne's HAL suit. There was a recent annoucement for a pneumatic actuator+cable type suit going on sale, with only a small onboard compressed air tank (it assumes a working environment with readily available compressed air, such as hospitals and factories), which oddly seems to use some sort of mouth suction control.

http://innophys.jp

There was the recent showing of a korean shipyard (Daewoo?) using a HULC style exoskeleton with over-shoulder cargo lift brace with a magnet for lifting steel segments. An american shipyard also was recently on exoskeleton variations, such as an Aliens style steadycam arm on the pelvis to support tools, and a MIT I believe was working on a suit with auxiliary support arms to hold stuff while you work on it (aka Doctor Octopus style secondary arms).

There is a swiss company working on leg (more like ass) support exoskeletons.

http://www.noonee.ch

I believe Toyota and other japanese companies have been working on similar leg type exoskeletons for factory use. Komatsu has been working on a upper torso/arm exosuit for agricultural applications (not really powerful, but picking fruit overhead really tires out the arms, so having the weight of the arm nullified is a huge boost in and of itself). Panasonic, via a subsidiary, is working on full exosuits (I think they actually use a powerloader nomenclature, and they sure look like that Aliens powerloader exosuit).

BMW was using a 3D printed hand/thumb brace (passive exoskeleton?) to make certain factory work easier.


Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #70 on: November 21, 2014, 10:56:32 pm »
Something a little different but it may have practical uses, Bionic boots by Keahi Seymour.They are claiming you could hit 40KMH..






http://www.bionicboot.com/

Offline The Artist

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #71 on: November 23, 2014, 11:26:26 am »
Those Bionic Boots, while using high tech materials, would probably still be classed as stilts. And, that stilts can boost speed is not new knowledge. Jim Henson talked about that fact in the making of documentary The World of The Dark Crystal when talking about the Landstrider costumes. With that discussion was shown footage of movement and costume tests. The attached small image is the best I could find with a quick search.

However. The use of springs in the Bionic Boots is an improvement in stilt technology as it decreases the length of stilt required to attain the higher speeds. Lower to the ground is safer and, from a military view, presents less of a target.
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Offline ouroboros

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #72 on: November 28, 2014, 09:44:26 pm »
The Bionic Boot seems to be a newer variation of other, preexisting power boot footwear. Most of those tended to use a steel or carbon fiber rebound bar/spring arcing from the contact pad to the back of the lower leg. This one appears to use pneumatic dampers similar to artificial muscle actuators, the idea being the tensile strength of the bladder tubes contains the pressure of compression as the tube is stretched out lengthwise. I suppose the good point of this system is that the "muscle" seems to tailorable by varying the number of tubes, which would seem to be easier than swapping out rebound bar assemblies of classical powerboots. Also, single tube failure wouldn't be as catastrophic as a carbon fiber spar shattering...

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #74 on: December 10, 2014, 03:40:06 pm »
Quote
Robo-Mate: Intelligent exoskeleton based on human-robot interaction for manipulation of heavy goods in Europe's factories of the future
In Europe’s industry and industrial manufacturing processes, manual material handling is one of the most frequent operations. This material handling is carried out by workers. However, load manipulation and manual handling has a severe impact on workers’ health. Work related low back pain and injuries are the most common musculoskeletal disorders and they are directly related to frequent manual handling of heavy loads.
The goal of Robo-Mate is to develop a user-friendly intelligent light or mid-weight human-robotic exoskeleton for manual handling work in different industries. The device will be deployable within half a day and will not require task specific programming. The newly developed exoskeleton will be highly flexible and used directly in craft or mass production or in auxiliary processes.
Quote


Much more at the link
http://www.robo-mate.eu



First prototype is supposed to be tested in Summer 2015.

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #75 on: December 13, 2014, 09:02:45 am »

Parker Hannifin seems to be making a play for medical exoskeletons.




Offline Richard N

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #76 on: December 19, 2014, 03:38:39 pm »
ReWalk-More Than Walking


http://www.rewalk.com/

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #78 on: April 27, 2015, 07:47:16 am »
Quote
University of Limerick developing assistive exoskeletons for older adults  08.04.2015 16:40
  University of Limerick developing assistive exoskeletons for older adults height=300      University of Limerick developing assistive exoskeletons for older adults
     €250,000 in funding has been awarded to researchers in the University of Limerick (UL) to help develop a cutting-edge exoskeleton to assist older adults.
Part of the wider AXO-SUIT project, UL is partnering with Cork-based MTD to design and manufacture the device, with the whole project in general billed as a three-year activity, with a budget of €3m.
UL’s involvement is headed by Dr Leonard O’Sullivan, senior lecturer of ergonomics and human factors in the college's department of design and manufacturing technology.It's all about the user“The research we’ll be doing here in Limerick is specifically in the area of user-centred design, and also the ergonomic modelling of the exoskeleton design as it comes together,” he explained.
User-centred design is critical in this field because, without it, functionality is useless.
“Exoskeletons have already been designed, some in rehabilitation settings. But in order for them to be able to be used in normal settings, they are going to have to be designed so they are useable. They’re technically fine, but for a user to put them on, we’re dealing with people of reduced mobility here…"
Dr O’Sullivan’s team of post-doctoral and post-graduate researchers will be working on the project, which actually began late last year, for the full three years – and the assistance of MTD seems a fine fit.
“MTD are an engineering company that have been doing a lot of work in the pharma and med tech area, so they have a very good reputation on the mechanical engineering side of things,” said Dr O’Sullivan.
The Cork company will be involved in the design evaluation from a mechanical point of view and they will also be manufacturing the trial exoskeletons.
Exoskeleton height=445
An artist's render of the project's exoskeleton plans, via AXO-SUIT
This isn’t the first time Dr O’Sullivan and his UL team have worked on a project such as this. In the summer of 2013 he and his colleagues secured a major €480,000 in funding as part of a €5.8m EU project called Robomate.
In that instance too they were developing an exoskeleton, however it was related to industrial workers to help tackle musculoskeletal injuries.
In this case, Dr O’Sullivan hopes that come the expiration of the three-year project, he and his team will have developed a fully marketable product for an area set to boom.
Assisting people of reduced mobility is a growing concern worldwide, with World Health Organisation predictions that the world’s population of those aged over 60 will double by 2050.
By then representing 22pc of the world’s population, the imperative behind agility in our later years will become all the more important as the working lifespan is forced to increase for us all.
The project is coordinated by the European Commission's Ambient Assisted Living project.
http://www.siliconrepublic.com/innovation/item/41516-university-of-limerick-deve/


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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #79 on: April 28, 2015, 03:10:56 am »
I remember seeing an early ancestor of this (legs only) way back in the '90s on a visit to UL.
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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #80 on: April 29, 2015, 11:49:01 am »
However. The use of springs in the Bionic Boots is an improvement in stilt technology as it decreases the length of stilt required to attain the higher speeds. Lower to the ground is safer and, from a military view, presents less of a target.

Although from a military perspective the big advantage is having a soldier deploy further with more gear. I suspect the ultimate outcome of this research will see something that people normally remove prior to going into combat.

Offline AdamF

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #81 on: April 30, 2015, 09:32:44 am »
Although from a military perspective the big advantage is having a soldier deploy further with more gear. I suspect the ultimate outcome of this research will see something that people normally remove prior to going into combat.
Exoskeletons come from time when robots moving around autonomously were a pipe dream.  But with recent advances in things like self-driving cars, walking robots are far more useful than any exoskeleton.

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #88 on: August 30, 2015, 11:02:57 am »
Chinese lower limb exoskeleton with a bit of robotic hands too.


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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #93 on: March 20, 2016, 08:52:13 am »
The last half of that video reminds me of an old anime.


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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #94 on: March 23, 2016, 03:33:18 am »
They are further along than I thought.


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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #98 on: April 12, 2017, 01:32:56 pm »
Quote
Lockheed Martin Eyes Military Exoskeleton Market
(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued April 11, 2017)

ORLANDO, Fla. --- Eyeing a new generation of industrial and military exoskeletons, Lockheed Martin has licensed the bionic augmentation technology Dermoskeleton™ from B-Temia, Inc.

Dermoskeleton is the basis for computer-controlled devices that can increase mobility and load-carrying capacity by counteracting overstress on the lower back and legs. Lockheed Martin's technology license permits use of B-Temia technology to products for military, industrial, commercial and first-responder applications.

"This technology offers a pathway to increased loadbearing and greater agility for our FORTIS industrial exoskeleton," said Glenn Kuller, Advanced and Special Programs vice president at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "It can also help to solve existing limitations of powered exoskeletons for our military and first responders. We're excited about the potential we see here."

"This agreement confirms our company's technology leadership and value of our work in increasing human mobility in both industrial and defense applications," said B-Temia President and CEO Stéphane Bédard. "Our arrangement with Lockheed Martin provides another avenue for our bionic technology to enhance human performance."

The FORTIS exoskeleton is an unpowered, lightweight exoskeleton that increases an operator's strength and endurance by transferring the weight of heavy loads from the operator's body directly to the ground through a series of joints at the hips, knees and ankles. Originating from

Lockheed Martin's exoskeleton research to assist soldiers in carrying heavy equipment over long distances, the same principles were applied to exoskeleton development for use in industrial settings. For additional information, visit our website.


Founded in 2010, B-Temia is a developer and manufacturer of bionic technology in the growing market of human augmentation. Its proprietary Dermoskeleton™ technology provides improved mobility, strength and autonomy to the user, with applications in the medical, industrial and military fields.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

-ends-


Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #104 on: December 10, 2017, 03:21:14 pm »
Did searching around in papers and found this interesting hip exoskeleton for the elderly by Samsung
Full paper:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Keehong_Seo/publication/303886315_Fully_autonomous_hip_exoskeleton_saves_metabolic_cost_of_walking/links/59b1f883aca2728472d144e3/Fully-autonomous-hip-exoskeleton-saves-metabolic-cost-of-walking.pdf

Some key features:
Weight 2.8 kg including battery
Reduces metabolic cost of walking by 13% (average of a test on 5 healthy individuals)
Runtime 1.3 hours
Other papers detail walking uphill with similar reduction in metabolic cost and they are working on going up stairs

Now imagine if you souped this up. I haven't seen any other exoskeleton with this kind of metabolic cost reduction.

Edit:better picture
« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 03:45:13 pm by zaphd »

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #105 on: March 17, 2018, 02:49:04 pm »
Apparently integration testing of SOCOM's TALOS has been delayed to 2019 because of difficulties with the exoskeleton subsystem. But they are making progress.
http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/articles/2018/2/8/interview-with-socoms-new-acquisition-executive-james-smith
Quote
TALOS continues to push the boundaries of how much protection you can provide to the individual operator without sacrificing their mobility. As an S&T [science and technology] project, we’ve entered into the exciting stage where each of the individual vendors will begin delivering subsystems this fall and we’ll begin integration into the first functioning prototype. The current development schedule projects demonstrating a functional TALOS MK5 prototype during the summer of 2019. The Exoskeleton subsystem is the critical path for the first article prototype combat operator suit, and it remains the most complex which has resulted in design delays.

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #106 on: August 14, 2018, 08:47:27 pm »

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #107 on: August 15, 2018, 03:48:34 am »
from Eurosatory 2018


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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #109 on: September 01, 2018, 12:26:42 am »
from Eurosatory 2018



The lightning pack guys

http://www.lightningpacks.com/lightningpacks.com/Lightning_Packs,_LLC_%7C_Lightening_your_load,_lighting_your_way.html

found during their military contract research that, for their design at least, active recovery of motion energy to power a small generator/recharger actually added metabolic cost and added some discomfort because of gait manipulation/interference. The human body is heavily optimized for the gait it naturally uses, so messing with it is problematic. They did find that simple gait cancellation at the backpack did seem to work out though, so are now going to crowdfund that for sale.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #110 on: March 14, 2019, 01:12:17 am »
XoSoft showed off their Gamma version after 3 years of work

https://gfycat.com/LittleDesertedFlyinglemur


https://twitter.com/XoSoft_eu

Offline Kadija_Man

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #111 on: March 14, 2019, 06:51:31 pm »
Going to need an extra long extension cord...

Offline sferrin

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #112 on: March 15, 2019, 04:01:36 am »
Going to need an extra long extension cord...

They'll just put solar cells on the soldier's back pack.
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Offline Kadija_Man

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #113 on: March 15, 2019, 06:27:12 pm »
Going to need an extra long extension cord...

They'll just put solar cells on the soldier's back pack.

That'll do wonders for their camouflage and of course, work real well at night, right?

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #114 on: March 16, 2019, 12:57:04 am »
It's not for the military chaps...it's for when we're 90 years old so we can walk around without shattering our hips.

Offline sferrin

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #115 on: March 16, 2019, 06:24:53 am »
Going to need an extra long extension cord...

They'll just put solar cells on the soldier's back pack.

That'll do wonders for their camouflage and of course, work real well at night, right?

I can't believe you actually thought I was serious.  I was mocking those who think solar cells are the answer for everything. 
« Last Edit: March 16, 2019, 09:38:42 am by sferrin »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.