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US Pratt & Whitney/Curtiss-Wright SST Engines

Delta Force

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I've been trying to find information (specifications and possibly images) on the Pratt & Whitney JTF-17A and the Curtiss-Wright design submitted for the US SST program in the 1960s. While there is a wealth of information on the GE4, I haven't been able to find much on these other engine designs searching here or on the wider internet. I haven't even been able to find out the designation for the Curtiss-Wright submission. I'm not even sure if the Curtiss-Wright design was a turbojet/turbofan, I've seen some indications that it may have involved ramjet technologies (perhaps a J58 type hybrid design).
 

GeorgeA

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DTIC has quite a bit of info on the JTF17, mostly the contractor reports.

Suggest this topic be moved to Propulsion.
 

Delta Force

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Thanks for the excellent resources and quick responses. Where do you guys manage to find all of these resources?

Also, why is the JTF-17 diagram marked confidential? Was that a confidential corporate document or was the SST engine program at one point under US national security secrecy regulations? To some extent that would make sense due to the advanced propulsion technologies involved, but America's SST was going to be exported to NAM and even Soviet aligned nations such as Algeria and India. Why would an early document for a publicly funded commercial aircraft propulsion system be under security regulation?
 

blackkite

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Delta Force said:
Thanks for the excellent resources and quick responses. Where do you guys manage to find all of these resources?

Also, why is the JTF-17 diagram marked confidential? Was that a confidential corporate document or was the SST engine program at one point under US national security secrecy regulations? To some extent that would make sense due to the advanced propulsion technologies involved, but America's SST was going to be exported to NAM and even Soviet aligned nations such as Algeria and India. Why would an early document for a publicly funded commercial aircraft propulsion system be under security regulation?
Hi! I can't answer your questions exactly.
All my resources are this high class SPF member's posts(mainly Shockonlip's and skybolt's post) and internet sites.(Google)
I want to see Curtiss Wright TJ-60 and TJ-70's cross section drawings.
Any way, FAA, Lockheed and Boeing knows everything and still keep every documents now. ;)
 

blackkite

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In 1962, the company received a Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) contract to study compressor, turbine, and computer technologies for supersonic transport jet engines and began competing for a major government contract to develop and produce a supersonic commercial airliner engine. During the mid-1960s, the company sold its electronic fittings and components division at a time when it was plowing about $15 million of its own funds into the development of a supersonic transport plane engine.
Curtiss-Wright lost its bid to produce the supersonic engine, and, by 1967, the company had abandoned Berner's goal to build complete aircraft engines, opting to become a first-tier supplier, or subcontractor, for other companies involved in aerospace and other fields.

http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/history2/11/Curtiss-Wright-Corporation.html

And
http://www.abebooks.com/TJ60-Lightweight-Flexible-Turbojet-Supersonic-Transport/6116090059/bd
 

blackkite

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Key technology of this engine was variable area turbine nozzle.
Is this technology same as variable angle of attack turbine inlet stator?
 

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charleybarley

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Key technology of this engine was variable area turbine nozzle.
Is this technology same as variable angle of attack turbine inlet stator?
I guess the technology would much more difficult for the variable AoA stator but the end result basically the same, ie change in area, although the TJ60 looks a very crude way to change area. Also the blade is cooled but the blockage flap doesn't seem to be.
The TJ60 variable turbine is the gas gen turbine and very hot.
The only variable turbine stators I have read about are for power turbines (marine, industrial) so are somewhat cooler.
 

GeorgeA

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blackkite said:
Hi! P&W JT-11- F4 SST turbofan engine.

P&W submitted a duct-burning turbofan design for the for the SST, the JTF17. It was designed about a decade after the J91, which was the Pratt B-70 candidate engine and the direct ancestor of the original Navy J58, the J58-P-2. The JTF17 had about double the mass flow of the J58.
 

blackkite

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Thank you gentlemen! Nice informations. :)
 

blackkite

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Hi! TJ60 from Curtiss Wright document. I will post all of document. Please enjoy.
DBTF means duct burning turbo fan engine.
 

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blackkite

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Hi! JTF17 engine nacelle shape.
Source : Boeing 2707 engine evaluation.
 

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