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Short Take-Off/Vertical Landing (STOVL) Aircraft Carrier (S-CVX)

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Donald McKelvy
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A Short Take-Off/Vertical Landing (STOVL) Aircraft Carrier (S-CVX) by Calvano, Charles N and Harney, Robert C, NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (May 1998)

This report documents a systems engineering and design capstone project, directed by the Total Ship Systems Engineering (TSSE) faculty and undertaken by students in the TSSE program at the Naval Postgraduate School and performed over two academic quarters. It takes a fresh look at the basic design and operation of the modem aircraft carrier, assuming availability of short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, employing gas turbine ship propulsion and providing significant capability to support humanitarian operations. In the design study reported here, the authors take a systems engineering approach to a totally new carrier design which may best suit the requirements for the next generation aircraft carrier. The central goal was to provide a ship to meet all of the current mission requirements of the existing Nimitz class carriers but in a platform that is significantly lower in life cycle costs. The outcome is a ship based on a concept called super-island; a large island structure that can provides drive-through pit- stops for aircraft refueling and rearming as well as other major functions. Other areas of major innovation include: weapons handling, information processing and distribution, engineering layout and manning. The report provides an overview of the major ship systems as well as detailed discussions of selected design areas chosen to illustrate those systems that had the most impact on meeting design goals.

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Abraham Gubler

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Or you can download the same report - but in colour! - from the TSSE webpage:

http://www.nps.edu/academics/gseas/tsse/subPages/1997Project.html

In the era since World War II, the aircraft carrier has continued to play the role of the central element in U.S Navy power projection. With the end of the Cold War, the shift of focus from blue water engagements to littoral operations and the stark realities of fiscal conservatism, a fresh look at the basic design and operation of the modern aircraft carrier is warranted. In addition, major advances in computers and information systems, short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, automated handling systems and robotics provide new challenges and opportunities to the basic shape and functioning of the aircraft carrier.

This design study examined these often conflicting constraints and technologies and by means of a systems engineering approach developed a totally new carrier design which well suited the changing requirements for a next generation aircraft carrier. The central goal in this design was to provide a ship that can meet all of the current mission requirements of the existing Nimitz class carriers but in a platform that is significantly cheaper in life cycle costs.

The outcome is a ship based on a concept employing a large island structure that can provide drive through "pit-stops" for aircraft refueling and rearming as well as other major functions. Other areas of major innovation include: weapons handling, information processing and distribution, engineering layout and manning.

http://www.nps.edu/academics/gseas/tsse/docs/projects/1997/report.pdf
 
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