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Russian robot to visit the ISS

Flyaway

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07/23/2019

Skybot F-850 at Baikonur

Today, July 23, 2019, an anthropomorphic Skybot F-850 robot was delivered to the Baikonur cosmodrome for pre-flight preparation. It will be delivered to the International Space Station by the Soyuz MS-14 unmanned spacecraft, which is scheduled to launch in August 2019.

The humanoid robot Skybot F-850 was created by Android Technique and the Advanced Research Foundation for the Ministry of Emergency Situations. After docking the Soyuz with the ISS, it will be transferred from the ship to the Russian segment of the station, where, under the control of the cosmonaut of Roscosmos Alexander Skvortsov, he will perform several tasks. In total, it will stay in orbit for 1.5 weeks, then return to Earth in early September.

Launch of the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft is scheduled for August 22. It will pass in an unmanned mode and will become a test for the Soyuz-2.1a launch vehicle, since before that it had put cargo ships and various spacecraft into orbit. Soyuz-2 of stage 1a replaces the carrier rocket Soyuz-FG, which since 2002 has been delivering international crews to orbit.


Originally it was a combat robot:

 

FighterJock

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One thing that puzzles me about sending robots on the ISS, will there be anyway that they can bring them back down to Earth before the station burns up when the ISS is due to de-orbit? or will they end up being left on the station? :confused:
 

Flyaway

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One thing that puzzles me about sending robots on the ISS, will there be anyway that they can bring them back down to Earth before the station burns up when the ISS is due to de-orbit? or will they end up being left on the station? :confused:
This one is only staying a week & half. I am not sure the US robot is currently on station either.
 

TomcatViP

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Someone got a lot of money to spend because I don't see how humanoid shape, being more heavy than anything else, can be of any help in free-floating space (what's the need for legs and then torso? ).

Does it have genitals also?
 
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dan_inbox

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what's the need for legs and then torso?
Since every equipment on board the ISS (and everwhere else) is designed for being operated by humans, a humanoid form is the best way to being truely polyvalent.
Any other shape can be more efficient at certain tasks and in certain environments, yes. But it'll be limited to those.
So "investing" in those apparently useless appendages is really yielding a leapfrog to the next level.
 
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