Rolls Royce XG-40

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On the engine that became the EJ200

Xg-40 Engine Demonstrates Full Augmented Thrust​

APRIL 251988
XG-40 Engine Demonstrates Full Augmented Thrust
NEW YORK
Rolls-Royce’s XG-40 military technology demonstrator engine achieved full augmented thrust earlier this month in tests at the company’s Bristol, England, facility. ‘
The 20,000-lb.-thrust class XG-40 is being used by Rolls-Royce to develop technologies for the EJ200, the proposed powerplant for the future European fighter aircraft. Eurojet Turbo Gmbh., a fournation consortium consisting of Rolls-
Royce, Motorenund Turbinen-Union, Fiat Aviazione and Spain’s SENER, expects to develop the EJ200 for production delivery in the mid-1990s.
The goal of the XG-40 program is to develop a military engine with a thrust-toweight ratio of 10. XG-40 core tests began in late 1986. Afterburner rig tests were conducted last year at Royal Aircraft Establishment facilities at Pyestock, England (AW&ST Mar. 2, 1987, p. 63). □

Rolls-Royce Tests XG-40 Engine Fuel System, Afterburner Design
MARCH 2 1987
Rolls-Royce Tests XG-40 Engine Fuel System, Afterburner Design

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

runs. The proposed EJ200 engine for the European fighter aircraft (EFA), being designed by a consortium of Rolls-Royce, MTU of West Germany, Fiat Aviazione of Italy and Sener of Spain, will make use of data derived from the XG-40 tests (AW&ST June 23, 1986, p. 105). The XG-40 has a five-stage compressor driven by a singlestage turbine. The high-pressure turbine is designed to operate at about 200C higher than the present Turbo-Union RB. 199 engine, which powers the British Aerospace Experimental Aircraft Program (EAP) technology demonstrator. The XG-40 was completed in December, 1986 (photo below), and began its test runs at Bristol in January. The engine was designed to produce 20,232-lb. thrust and to have a 10:1 thrust-to-weight ratio. Test runs on the stand at Bristol will include demonstrations of an electronic fuel control system and an advanced afterburner design. A second XG-40 engine is being readied to enter the test program later in the year.

Rolls Readies Demonstrator Engine For European Fighter Aircraft
JUNE 23 1986
Rolls Readies Demonstrator Engine For European Fighter Aircraft

ADVANCED FIGHTER TECHNOLOGY

Bristol, England—Rolls-Royce XG-40 demonstrator engine, the core high pressure spool of which has been running on a test rig here since March, is expected to prove its ability to meet the requirements laid down for the European fighter aircraft powerplant in a series of tests that will continue into early 1987.

This would permit the four partner companies in the new Eurofighter engine consortium to begin full-scale development of an engine based primarily on the XG-40 design later this year, in order to have it flying in 1990 and ready to power the EFA development aircraft during at least the latter stages of flight testing of the airframe in about 1992.

Partner Companies

The four partner companies are RollsRoyce, Motorenund Turbinen-Union of West Germany, Fiat of Italy and Sener of Spain.

EFA specifications call for an engine rated at 20,232 lb. minimum takeoff thrust with afterburner.

In addition to EFA, Rolls-Royce sees the Eurofighter engine as a possible powerplant or technology base for:

■ Advanced Panavia Tornado air defense versions, if operational requirements call for improved aircraft performance.

■ A new single-engine light combat aircraft with capabilities beyond current light strike aircraft.

■ The basis of a new powerplant for an advanced short takeoff-vertical landing aircraft.

■ Basic component technology for an advanced small turboprop engine, with a power rating of less than 10,000 shp.

Rolls-Royce believes there will be little alternative to using the XG-40 as the basis for the Eurofighter engine, since no other engine company in the four cooperating nations has begun development work on any other concept.


The EFA project was not yet in existence when Rolls-Royce sized the engine according to its own judgment of what would be required, emphasizing a high specific thrust capability and a high compressor ratio.

The XG-40 was funded 85% by the British Ministry of Defense and 15% by Rolls-Royce. It was sized at 20,232 lb. thrust (90 kilonewtons) and was designed to have a 10:1 thrust-to-weight ratio.

Three basic test phases are planned. Component testing is nearing completion and test running of the full engine is planned for October, 1986. It will include an electronic fuel control system and an advanced afterburner.

A five-stage high-pressure compressor driven by a single-stage turbine has been tested and an alternate three-stage highpressure compressor has been designed. The five-stage compressor, with a pressure ratio of 6.5:1, has completed 50 hr. of testing without problems. It incorporates tip clearance control and uses low-aspect ratio blades to gain beneficial surge characteristics without adding to the compressor weight.

Afterburner Tests

The afterburner module began tests at the British Royal Aircraft Establishment’s Pyestock, England, facility late in 1985. High inlet temperatures have increased the difficulty of developing a satisfactory unit.

The complete XG-40 engine is scheduled to begin running in October, with a second unit to be delivered for test in 1987.
Current planning calls for the four companies to perform collaborative detail design definition work on the EFA engine concurrent with the XG-40 demonstrator testing and with complementary advanced technology work by the other three companies in the program.

Rolls-Royce officials note that the XG40 “lends itself to more advanced materials, including composites and reinforced ceramics,” and said that the components that would benefit markedly from the adoption of technologically advanced materials will be redesigned to incorporate them, if necessary.

Latest decision concerning the EFA engine concept has been to select convergent/divergent nozzle technology, as opposed to a more common convergent nozzle.

The Eurofighter engine will be expected to operate at extremely high temperatures, with the high-pressure turbine running at 200C more than that in the existing Turbo-Union RB. 199, according to officials in the Eurofighter program.

Data derived from the XG-40 development program can be progressively fed into the EFA engine design, along with specific technology developed by the other partners, Gordon Lewis, Rolls-Royce corporate technical director, said. This will enable collaborative pre-development engines to be specified and tested before hardware is committed to production.

The EFA engine will be broken down into modules, which can be developed and produced by the four partner companies.

Still to be settled is whether the initial test versions of the EFA will be powered by the new EFA engine, or by an existing engine, such as the RB. 199 or the General Electric F404.

Rolls Engine Demonstrates Technology To Be Used for European Fighter
MAY 5 1986
Rolls Engine Demonstrates Technology To Be Used for European Fighter

New York—Rolls-Royce is testing its XG-40 technology demonstrator engine core for the British Ministry of Defense at the company’s Military Engine Group facility in Bristol, England. Testing of a complete engine will begin late this year, with a second engine following in 1987.

Technology from the afterburning, 20,000-lb.-thrust-class XG-40 will be used in the European fighter aircraft (EFA) engine program (AW&ST Jan. 20, p. 15).

The core components—compressor, combustor and turbine—were rig tested separately prior to core assembly. Tests of the XG-40 afterburning system, developed from the RB. 199 and XG-20 programs, were initiated late last year at the Royal Aircraft Establishment gas turbine facility at Pyestock, England.

The engine’s five-stage high-pressure compressor incorporates two variable-geometry stages, tip clearance control and advanced aerodynamic blading. Other advanced technologies used in the engine include high-strength disk materials, lowdensity single crystal blades, advanced sealing techniques and ceramic coatings.

The thrust to weight ratio of the engine is estimated at about 10. □

Most of what I’ve found to date on the XG40.
 
XG-40.jpg
Technology from the Rolls-Royce/Ministry of Defense XG-40 demonstrator engine program will be incorporated into the European
fighter aircraft. The XG-40 engine core, shown here, is undergoing testing at Rolls-Royce’s Military Engine Group in Bristol, England.


New York—Rolls-Royce is testing its XG-40 technology demonstrator engine core for the British Ministry of Defense at the company’s Military Engine Group facility in Bristol, England. Testing of a complete engine will begin late this year, with a second engine following in 1987. Technology from the afterburning, 20,000-lb.-thrust-class XG-40 will be used in the European fighter aircraft (EFA) engine program (AW&ST Jan. 20, p, 15).

The core components—compressor, combustor and turbine—were rig tested separately prior to core assembly. Tests of the

XG-40 afterburning system, developed from the RB. 199 and XG-20 programs, were initiated late last year at the Royal Aircraft Establishment gas turbine facility at Pyestock, England.

The engine‘s five-stage high-pressure compressor incorporates two variable-geometry stages, tip clearance control and advanced aerodynamic blading. Other advanced technologies used in the engine include high-strength disk materials, low density single crystal blades, advanced sealing techniques and ceramic coatings. The thrust to weight ratio of the engine
is estimated at about 10.
Same article with photo. Source: AWST 5 May 1986
 
High-pressure spool for the Rolls-Royce XG-40 development version of the Advanced Fighter Engine proposed for the European Fighter Aircraft is expected to make its first test run at Rolls’ Bristol, England, development facility in late January or early February. The complete XG-40 engine will run later in the year. A refined version of the XG-40 is expected to be ready in mid-1987 for use as a test engine in the EFA program. XG—40 also could be used to power an improved version of the Panavia Tornado aircraft.

Source: AWST 20 Jan 1986
 

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