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Putnam Books We Need to See

saturncanuck

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With Putnam changing their style and content lately, it seems the manufacturer series is uncertain. While most of the British companies were done, I was looking forward to some more "American" subjects.

Here, then, is a wish list for future (if any) Putnam books....

Rockwell (North American)
Fairchild Republic and Predecessors
Martin
Northrop
Sikorsky
Vought

:)
 

robunos

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some from me...

Cessna

Piper

Auster


cheers,
Robin.
 

Triton

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Have there been any books devoted to projects of the Lockheed Georgia subsidiary of Lockheed Martin? Would there be enough material to make an interesting book? Probably not as sexy as a book devoted to Skunk Works.
 

Stargazer2006

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Probably not, but imagine this: a mini-series on Lockheed's subsidiaries: a book on Vega, one on Georgia, one on Skunk Works...

My choice for Putnams on US companies would definitely be (not necessarily in that order):
1°) Sikorsky (why not toss in Piasecki for good measure, now that they are one?)
2°) Fairchild and all related companies in history (Fairchild Canada, Chase, Fairchild-Republic, etc.)
3°) Martin
4°) Ryan (and Teledyne Ryan of course)
5°) Northrop (and Radioplane, Avion, Ventura, etc.)
6°) North American (and Rockwell, General Aviation, etc.)

As for other international manufacturers:
1°) Canadair
2°) Antonov
3°) Fokker (and American Fokker, Atlantic-Fokker, etc.)
4°) Dassault (and Bloch)
5°) Heinkel

Well, if Putnam doesn't pull off that trick, I guess any other publisher with the same quality would do...
 

Stargazer2006

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Did I actually omit Convair??? (and General Dynamics, Consolidated, Vultee, Stinson...)
This would be one of my faves!!
 
J

joncarrfarrelly

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A Putnam/Naval Institute Press volume on North American Rockwell by David Baker, ISBN 0870214306, was evidently published in 1992, I've
been unable to locate a copy.

General Dynamic Aircraft and Their Predecessors (Thomas Brothers & Thomas-Morse. Dayton-Wright. Consolidated Aircraft Corporation. Hall Aluminium. Stinson. Convair. General Dynamics.) by John Wegg was published in 1990.

Piasecki Helicopter became Vertol became Boeing, not Sikorsky.

Narkiewicz/ Thompson publishers have done excellent Putnam-ish books on the following:
North American Aircraft 1934-1999 (2 volumes)
Martin 1909-1960
Fairchild 1926-1987
Vultee 1932-1947

Jon
 

Stargazer2006

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Thanks for filling me in on these two Putnam books I didn't know.

As for Piasecki, well... you're right... and wrong at the same time! But the Piasecki story is a little complicated. After his company was purchased by Vertol (a division of Boeing), Frank Piasecki set up another business under his name, which produced the Model 16-H Pathfinder. Since then, the company seemed to lay dormant but it was recently heard of again when Piasecki modified a Sikorsky Black Hawk into the X-49 Speedhawk. That second Piasecki company is now part of United Technologies with Sikorsky, if I'm not mistaken, and they both produce the X2 demonstrator together.
 

saturncanuck

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joncarrfarrelly said:
A Putnam/Naval Institute Press volume on North American Rockwell by David Baker, ISBN 0870214306, was evidently published in 1992, I've
been unable to locate a copy.

General Dynamic Aircraft and Their Predecessors (Thomas Brothers & Thomas-Morse. Dayton-Wright. Consolidated Aircraft Corporation. Hall Aluminium. Stinson. Convair. General Dynamics.) by John Wegg was published in 1990.

Wow, I didn't know about this North American book. I shall have to look for it. I have GD.

Mind you, I still like the old, smaller Putnam books.
 

saturncanuck

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Stargazer2006 said:
Probably not, but imagine this: a mini-series on Lockheed's subsidiaries: a book on Vega, one on Georgia, one on Skunk Works...

My choice for Putnams on US companies would definitely be (not necessarily in that order):
1°) Sikorsky (why not toss in Piasecki for good measure, now that they are one?)
2°) Fairchild and all related companies in history (Fairchild Canada, Chase, Fairchild-Republic, etc.)
3°) Martin
4°) Ryan (and Teledyne Ryan of course)
5°) Northrop (and Radioplane, Avion, Ventura, etc.)
6°) North American (and Rockwell, General Aviation, etc.)

As for other international manufacturers:
1°) Canadair
2°) Antonov
3°) Fokker (and American Fokker, Atlantic-Fokker, etc.)
4°) Dassault (and Bloch)
5°) Heinkel

Well, if Putnam doesn't pull off that trick, I guess any other publisher with the same quality would do...

Wow, sounds like my list, huh?

Ok, enough of the sarcasm.... MY friends Larry Milberry and Ron Pickler wrote "Canadair: The First 50 Years", published by Canav Books, 1995, 0-921022-07-7

Putnam did put out "Fokker: The Adventuring Years" My Dad had a copy.

Putnam seems to be doing the Russian and German manufacturers now, so Antonov and Heinkel are possible. (although Antonov is now Ukranian)
 

Stargazer2006

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Hey! I purposely didn't look at your list so as not to get influenced... and they ended up the same or just about! I swear! LOL
 

saturncanuck

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Stargazer2006 said:
Hey! I purposely didn't look at your list so as not to get influenced... and they ended up the same or just about! I swear! LOL

Hey, just kidding!!!!!

Giggles.

:)
 

Hoo-2b-2day

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I would be happy for something like:

Italian Aircraft of WW2 (I have Thompson work "Italian Civil & Military Aircraft 1936-1945 but I feel its time for a new work.

French Aircraft of WW2

An updated Polish Aircraft (I have the original but would love a post cold war update)

Some Japanese manufacturers such as Mitsubishi and Nakajima Aircraft, to supplement to the two Putnam's on Japanese aircraft.

A few more German such as Dornier Focke-Wulf or Heinkel.

And most of all a reprint of "Miles Aircraft since 1925" so I can afford to buy it.
 

saturncanuck

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Hoo-2b-2day said:
I would be happy for something like:

Italian Aircraft of WW2 (I have Thompson work "Italian Civil & Military Aircraft 1936-1945 but I feel its time for a new work.

French Aircraft of WW2

An updated Polish Aircraft (I have the original but would love a post cold war update)

Some Japanese manufacturers such as Mitsubishi and Nakajima Aircraft, to supplement to the two Putnam's on Japanese aircraft.

A few more German such as Dornier Focke-Wulf or Heinkel.

And most of all a reprint of "Miles Aircraft since 1925" so I can afford to buy it.

The Italian one would be nice. Not to much out there on these.

The Japanese aircraft were pretyt much covered by the two Putnams, but, there might be more detail out there.

As for German aircraft, I think Putnam is working on these.

As for French Aircraft, it would be quite thin.
 
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joncarrfarrelly

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Stargazer2006 said:
Thanks for filling me in on these two Putnam books I didn't know.

As for Piasecki, well... you're right... and wrong at the same time! But the Piasecki story is a little complicated. After his company was purchased by Vertol (a division of Boeing), Frank Piasecki set up another business under his name, which produced the Model 16-H Pathfinder. Since then, the company seemed to lay dormant but it was recently heard of again when Piasecki modified a Sikorsky Black Hawk into the X-49 Speedhawk. That second Piasecki company is now part of United Technologies with Sikorsky, if I'm not mistaken, and they both produce the X2 demonstrator together.

I'm aware of Piasecki's other company and it is not a part of UT, and I've not seen anything suggesting they are partnering on the X-2, indeed the X2 and X-49 could be considered competing designs. The X-49A program uses a YSH-60F airframe but that seems to be the extent of Sikorsky involvement. Boeing is providing the flight test support for the program.
 
J

joncarrfarrelly

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saturncanuck said:
Wow, I didn't know about this North American book. I shall have to look for it.

Good luck, I've been searching for the past ten years and have yet to see a copy come available.
It's the only hole in my US Putnam collection.

Jon
 

Hoo-2b-2day

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In regard to the North American Rockwell book - has anyone actually seen a copy of this. I have done an extensive search including several military libraries, several national library databases witout finding a copy. (the library of Congress list the title but does not appear to hold a copy.

I am a bit suspect that this book may not have been published, and "exist" only due to its ISBN code. Often the ISBN in obtained but the book is not published or only in very small numbers (proof copies or limited run academic publications). Also at http://isbn.nu/9780870214301#biblio_detail is states "Publication Cancelled"
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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From Tony Buttler
I have spoken to my editor about the current status of the Putnam imprint, and we are not sure just who the label now belongs to. It seems very unlikely that any new titles for individual manufacturers will be forthcoming, at least for a while (unless anyone knows more about this). I understand that this type of book has rather 'gone out of fashion', because they do not make much money.

I have asked David Baker if he can tell us what happened to the NAA/Rockwell title, but he is a busy man so it may be a while before I hear anything.
 

Bailey

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And most of all a reprint of "Miles Aircraft since 1925" so I can afford to buy it.

That certainly gets my vote, last time I saw a second hand copy, they wanted £130.00 for it.

Auster/Beagle would be very nice too. :)
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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From Tony Buttler

Those of you looking for the Miles Putnam should check out Air-Britain's

Miles Aircraft - The Early Years
The Story of F G Miles and his Aeroplanes 1925-1939.

This is written by Peter Amos. Peter's research has continued for years and this is far more up to date, and corrects the many errors in the Putnam. It is expensive for non-members, but the plan is to finance Volume 2 (Miles WW2 aircraft) when this has sold out.
 

zebedee

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Stargazer2006 said:
That second Piasecki company is now part of United Technologies with Sikorsky, if I'm not mistaken, and they both produce the X2 demonstrator together.

The X2 technology is entirely Sikorskys own and derived from the the S69 Advancing Blade Concept demonstrator of the early 70's. The bird itself has been built by Sikorskys Hawk works which is part of what was Schweitzer, who were bought out by Sikorsky a couple of years back. The Piasecki X49 (and the Chinook concept they are proposing) do look as though its having input from Boeing though, certainly in the provision of testing facilities...
http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2007/07/03/215329/picture-piasecki-flies-x-49a-speedhawk-compound-helicopter.html

Zeb
 

Stargazer2006

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Okay, thank you so much for the explanations. Then I must have been misled into believing it was Piasecki, not Schweizer, that became part of Sikorsky a while ago. Don't know why though...
 

Triton

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overscan said:
From Tony Buttler
I have spoken to my editor about the current status of the Putnam imprint, and we are not sure just who the label now belongs to. It seems very unlikely that any new titles for individual manufacturers will be forthcoming, at least for a while (unless anyone knows more about this). I understand that this type of book has rather 'gone out of fashion', because they do not make much money.

I have asked David Baker if he can tell us what happened to the NAA/Rockwell title, but he is a busy man so it may be a while before I hear anything.

That's such a shame. Tony didn't say that Putnam had lost money on this series of aviation books. Sad that there is so much pressure to print projects that offer higher profit margins and they are not content to print books on esoteric topics that are a modest success. Is this reluctance also because the publisher does not want to risk paying an author an advance so that he or she can write the book with an uncertain return?

Orionblamblam can probably tell us how difficult it is to self-publish and make a living as well.
 

Stargazer2006

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That's unbridled capitalism for you... when the bankers, financiers and speculators dictate what you like, what you want, what you need... In their so-called "new world order", money is the prime value in existence and everything that is not sufficiently profitable or efficient must disappear from the picture. It's a sad, sad world indeed.
 

saturncanuck

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joncarrfarrelly said:
saturncanuck said:
Putnam did put out "Fokker: The Adventuring Years" My Dad had a copy.

That would be Fokker: The Creative Years. ;)

Yes, I belive that is correct. As I said it was my Dads book, not mine.

Actually, we had always joked that the "biggest" Putnam volume would be entitled....

"BAe and Predecessors"

giggles
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Nobody goes into Aviation publishing to make money. Even "big sellers" are very limited print runs. Some books will never even break even.
 
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joncarrfarrelly

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saturncanuck said:
Actually, we had always joked that the "biggest" Putnam volume would be entitled....

"BAe and Predecessors"

giggles

The giant fold-out, annotated family tree would no doubt make the book cost prohibitive. ;)
 

saturncanuck

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joncarrfarrelly said:
saturncanuck said:
Actually, we had always joked that the "biggest" Putnam volume would be entitled....

"BAe and Predecessors"

giggles

The giant fold-out, annotated family tree would no doubt make the book cost prohibitive. ;)

Oh man, I have to tellyou, I laughed for 5 minutes after I read this.

Nice remark, well done.

Ya, that would be quite a volume, huh?
 

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overscan said:
Nobody goes into Aviation publishing to make money. Even "big sellers" are very limited print runs. Some books will never even break even.

Hi
And it will get more difficult in the UK with the Public Library / Museum policy of creating “New Cultural Identities”. From Local County Libraries All the Putnam books have gone with the vast majority of the Classic books on Aviation and Second World War. A huge treasure trove of experience has been destroyed for ever.
Tens of thousands of books (not just aviation etc.) have been removed from the shelves only about 5 to 10% of the books including new ones are to be found on the Shelves of the local libraries now compared with about ten years ago. So I wish all authors the very best of luck in to days climate.
 

saturncanuck

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Spark said:
overscan said:
Nobody goes into Aviation publishing to make money. Even "big sellers" are very limited print runs. Some books will never even break even.

Hi
And it will get more difficult in the UK with the Public Library / Museum policy of creating “New Cultural Identities”. From Local County Libraries All the Putnam books have gone with the vast majority of the Classic books on Aviation and Second World War. A huge treasure trove of experience has been destroyed for ever.
Tens of thousands of books (not just aviation etc.) have been removed from the shelves only about 5 to 10% of the books including new ones are to be found on the Shelves of the local libraries now compared with about ten years ago. So I wish all authors the very best of luck in to days climate.

Wow, well I have my "Shorts" first edition (bought at the Shuttleworth Trust fly-in, BTW) and "British Flying-Boats" too (1st edition). My Dad collected "ALL" of the first editions but I didn't keep the duplicates after he passed, but now I wish I had.
 

zebedee

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saturncanuck said:
The giant fold-out, annotated family tree would no doubt make the book cost prohibitive. ;)

Why am i thinking of something like Pete Frame's Rock Family Tree illustrations...?

Actually Im half tempted to have a go at this... might take a couple of weeks... watch this space...

:)

Zeb
 

Stargazer2006

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The demise of Aviation publications is a reality all over the world I'm afraid. Here in Paris, we had a wonderful aviation section at the Brentano's American bookstore. As a kid and a teenager, I used to love it when my dad took me there and I could browse the magazines and books. Then all of a sudden, sometime in the 1990s, someone decided that aviation books were not profitable and simply called the whole section OFF... There are still a few specialized outlets here and there, mostly mail order, but when that happened I realized that perhaps we had entered a new era...
 

saturncanuck

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zebedee said:
saturncanuck said:
The giant fold-out, annotated family tree would no doubt make the book cost prohibitive. ;)

Why am i thinking of something like Pete Frame's Rock Family Tree illustrations...?

Actually Im half tempted to have a go at this... might take a couple of weeks... watch this space...

:)

Zeb

I shall
 

robunos

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Those of you looking for the Miles Putnam should check out Air-Britain's

Miles Aircraft - The Early Years
The Story of F G Miles and his Aeroplanes 1925-1939.

This is written by Peter Amos. Peter's research has continued for years and this is far more up to date, and corrects the many errors in the Putnam. It is expensive for non-members, but the plan is to finance Volume 2 (Miles WW2 aircraft) when this has sold out.

Is there any more information on this? How does it compare to the published putnam's 'Miles'?
Is it effectively the unreleased 2nd edition mentioned here :-

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Miles-Aircraft-Since-1925-Peter/dp/0851777872/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1251047883&sr=8-1


Cheers,
Robin.
 

Hoo-2b-2day

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While doing a google search regarding what is happening with Putnam's book's (without luck) I did come across this sight which may interest some of you as it list all of Putnam's aircraft books (from 1909) along with affiliated companies.

http://library.paisley.ac.uk/services/specialcoll/putnam/putnam.htm
 

Stargazer2006

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Wow. A real treasure trove. Shame there are no pictures of the covers, and no indexes by series, which surely would have helped finding stuff more easily... but cool, anyway.
 

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Stargazer2006 said:
Probably not, but imagine this: a mini-series on Lockheed's subsidiaries: a book on Vega, one on Georgia, one on Skunk Works...

My choice for Putnams on US companies would definitely be (not necessarily in that order):
1°) Sikorsky (why not toss in Piasecki for good measure, now that they are one?)
2°) Fairchild and all related companies in history (Fairchild Canada, Chase, Fairchild-Republic, etc.)
3°) Martin
4°) Ryan (and Teledyne Ryan of course)
5°) Northrop (and Radioplane, Avion, Ventura, etc.)
6°) North American (and Rockwell, General Aviation, etc.)

As for other international manufacturers:
1°) Canadair
2°) Antonov
3°) Fokker (and American Fokker, Atlantic-Fokker, etc.)
4°) Dassault (and Bloch)
5°) Heinkel

Well, if Putnam doesn't pull off that trick, I guess any other publisher with the same quality would do...

I believe there would be some crossover between the Fokker story and the North American stories.

From Fokker Aircraft Builders to the World by Thijs Postma, English Translation by Jane's Publishing 1980.

1929:
"In May, General Motors acquired 40 per cent of the shares. Fokker, who owned 20 per cent, was engaged as technical manager, but found it difficult to work with the management, which had come almost completely from the automobile industry."

1930:
"In America, the name Fokker Aircraft Corporation was changed to General Aviation Corporation." (page 85)

1931:
Too much to quote so I'll sum it up.

After the Failure of a TWA Fokker Tri-motor wing in flight (yes - that one) the reputation of the Fokker transports suffered. General Motors ousted Anthony Fokker from the American operations.

Also.
I'm fairly sure that some of the American Fokker (under General Aviation) designs - such as the PJ-1 or FLB - were built in Dundalk in the Curtis-Caproni plant. North American got started in the Berlinner Joyce plant which is (the building still stands but maybe not for much longer) maybe a half mile from the site of the Curtis Caproni plant. I think North American utilized that plant when they ramped up production of the Yale, Harvard, Texan trainers before the move to California.

Mike
 

Stargazer2006

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Thanks. Yes, the old American Fokker/Atlantic Fokker and Berliner Joyce both came under the control of North American, though I don't know about the Curtiss-Caproni connection.

Actually, the "J" used by US Navy for North American was originally for Berliner-Joyce!

Atlantic Fokker designations reached AF-17 (the XA-7 fighter). The latter part of the list were sometimes refered to as GA-..., and a couple were even found as North American after they took over.

What I've never been able to determine is why North American started at NA-15. Perhaps Berliner-Joyce had done 14 models before? Or maybe at the time of takeover, there were 14 BJ and AF models still marketed?
 
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