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Northrop Aircraft (NORAIR) Project Designations

Maveric

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Hi all,

I search the factory numbers of Northrop aircraft:
XB.35; YB.35; XP.79B; F.5E; P.61 versions; F.89C; JB.1/MX.543; MX.324; MX.334; F.20; YB.49; X.4; X.21A; M2F-2; HL.10; A.9A; YF.17; B.2; YF.23 and " Tactic Blue ".

Thanks and Servus
 

elmayerle

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That's "Tacit Blue", not "Tactic Blue", and I'm not sure that it's company designation is releaseable under the security guidelines (and, yes, I do know it).

I believe the YF-17 is the P600. If memory serves me correctly, the B-35/B-49 family was under the basic N-9 number (the N-9M testbed being labelled "M" for "Model").
 

hesham

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For Northrop eary aircraft,

see this;
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,254.0.html
 

Andreas Parsch

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elmayerle said:
That's "Tacit Blue", not "Tactic Blue", and I'm not sure that it's company designation is releaseable under the security guidelines (and, yes, I do know it).
"Guidelines" only, and not a strict code? Did you see the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie? ;D

Anyway, I don't expect that you are entitled to reveal this designation. The USAF didn't announce its designation for the plane either, when they revealed the "Tacit Blue". After all, imagine what "the Enemy"[tm] could learn if they only knew this crucial number ... ::) ;)
 

elmayerle

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Andreas Parsch said:
elmayerle said:
That's "Tacit Blue", not "Tactic Blue", and I'm not sure that it's company designation is releaseable under the security guidelines (and, yes, I do know it).
"Guidelines" only, and not a strict code? Did you see the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie? ;D

Anyway, I don't expect that you are entitled to reveal this designation. The USAF didn't announce its designation for the plane either, when they revealed the "Tacit Blue". After all, imagine what "the Enemy"[tm] could learn if they only knew this crucial number ... ::) ;)
*chuckle* Well, "Guidelines" is what Security calls them (I'd call them fairly strict regulations. DOD is not noted for a sense of humor) and I've no intention of getting in trouble (I happen to need my clearance on my current job). About the only thing I'll say is that it's an earlier model number than the B-2. :D Mind you, the technology demonstrated on Tacit Blue promptly was developed into the B-2 and TSSAM; I'm given to understand that all three originated in the same building at different times.
 

Steve Pace

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I have a partial list of Northrop N numbers in a word document but I don't know how to attach it...

Steve Pace
stevepace43@gmail.com
 

flateric

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holy bananas! we have Steve here at least
 

Steve Pace

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Does anyone have the model number of the YF-23?
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Steve, you can either copy and paste the text into a post or attach the document using "Attach" below the post window - click Browse and choose the file.

(You have to make 3 posts before you can attach things)
 

flateric

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Steve Pace said:
Does anyone have the model number of the YF-23?
only internal designation I've seen so far was DP(design project?)117K (well, I know that it's not like those N(D)-XXX ones)

is there a book cooking on YF-23?
 

Stargazer2006

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Northrop designations can be found at this address:

http://www.scramble.nl/wiki/index.php?title=Northrop/Designations

Of course the list doesn't account for post-1960s projects, but most of it is pretty much under the seal of secrecy anyway.
 

Stargazer2006

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Nice addition to existing data. Thanks!

All the designations from N-250 onwards are new to me... Quite impressive stuff! Did you get this from inhouse documents, or was this ever published somewhere?

A few questions/remarks:
  • Are you sure about N-38 being also related to the RB-49, like the N-37?
  • N-17: Prothesis, investigations into artificial limbs... Weird! To me it's XP-61E, long range day fighter/bomber escort...
  • I have N-61 for the polar shelter and N-62 for a moulded aerofoil...
  • You give two conflicting versions of N-83... is this a typo?
  • I also have the same N-149 as you... but some sources erroneously give it for the XJ79 jet engine for X-21A project (which is silly of course because the X-21 itself is N-250... However it could be a typo for the missing N-249... just a thought).
  • N-156F was definitely the YF-5A... N-156A was the F-5A, N-156C was the RF-5A, and N-156B was the F-5B.
  • Concerning the N-126, N-149, N-167 and N-176 proposals for LRI-X, I recommend Airpower dated May 1991 which is packed with photos and information on the subject.
  • You give the X-21 as the "BLC" while in fact it was called the LFC (for Laminar Flow Control).
 

Skyraider3D

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Stargazer2006 said:
  • Concerning the N-126, N-149, N-167 and N-176 proposals for LRI-X, I recommend Airpower dated May 1991 which is packed with photos and information on the subject.
Would anyone happen to have scans of this article and willing to share them? :)


[edit]Thanks Paul! ;)[/edit]
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Northrop Aircraft Corporation

Compiled by Steve Pace

N-1, proposed two-engine flying wing bomber - N-1M scale model
N-2, XP-56 "Black Bullet," MX-14 (two built)
N-3, single-engine float-equipped patrol bomber - N-3PB for Norway
N-4, interceptor pursuit
N-5, interceptor pursuit
N-6, single-engine fighter for USN
N-7, wind tunnel model (no other information)
N-8, two-engine night interceptor pursuit, XP-61 (2), YP-61 (13) and production P-61A Black Widow, MX-563
N-9, four-engine flying wing bomber, XB-35, MX-140 (1/3rd scale models flew a N-9M, N-9MA and N-9MB designations)
YB-35
YB-49, MX-661 (shows MX-51 on company document but that MX number was erroneous)
N-10, Turbodyne turboprop engine for U.S. Navy, XT37-3, MX-562
XT37 engine evaluation and test by General Electric, MX-562-A
N-11, turbo supercharger for XT37
N-12, "Rocket Wing," powered test bed for XP-79, MX-324
MX-334, unpowered glider to test aerodynamic feasibility for XP-79 program
N-13, welding development for magnesium alloy
N-14, rocket-powered flying wing interceptor pursuit, XP-79, MX-365
XP-79B “Flying Ram”, twin-turbojet-powered version of canceled rocket-powered XP-79
N-15, twin-engine cargo airplane
N-16, one-engine jet bomb, JB-1, MX-543 and two-engine jet bomb, JB-10, MX-554
N-17, Prothesis, investigations into artificial limbs
N-18, one engine jet bomb, JB-1B
N-19, Turbodyne turboprop for U.S. Army Air Corps, XT37-1, MX-562-B
N-20, photographic reconnaissance airplane, XF-15A Reporter, MX-758
F-15A-1-NO
N-21, night intruder, XP-61F, MX-563
N-22, water craft
N-23, three-engine cargo airplane – Pioneer
N-24, XP/XF-89 Scorpion, MX-808
N-25, guided missile, MX-775 - became Snark
N-25B, bomber defense decoy missile
N-26, X-4 Bantam (previously XS-4), MX-810 (also known as Skylancer)
N-27, deceleration of air screws (propeller reverser), MX-981
N-28, Rand Research
N-29, Nuclear Energy Propulsion for Aircraft (NEPA) Research
N-30, airborne vehicle (crash fire fighting)
N-31, medium bomber
N-32, assault transport, YC-125 Raider, MP-97
N-33, castering gear
N-34, ongoing NEPA Research; renamed Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP)
N-35, all-weather interceptor, F-89A, F-89B and F-89C Scorpion, MP-80
N-36, Pioneer
N-37, photographic reconnaissance airplane, RB-49A
N-38, photographic reconnaissance aircraft, RB-49A
N-39, RB-35B, YB-35 conversion to…
N-40, YB-49 flying wing bomber prototype, MX-661
N-41, YRB-49A
N-42, zero length launcher (ZELL) undercarriage, MP-131
N-43, test ZELL undercarriage for N-42, MP-131
N-44, missile guidance system for MX-775 Snark
N-45, turbo test bench
N-46, RB-49
N-47, RB-49
N-48, reductor test, EB-35
N-49, YF-89A Scorpion
N-50, YB-49, MP-56
N-51, YB-35B, MP-48
N-52, YRB-49A, MP-55
N-53, interceptor
N-54, RF-89A Scorpion
N-55, patrol airplane
N-56, dielectric panel
N-57, launch recorder for MX-775 Snark
N-58, ejection seat
N-59, carrier-based bomber airplane
N-60, anti-submarine warfare airplane
N-61, U.S. Navy fighter aircraft
N-62, Polar shelter
N-63, vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) convoy fighter, ‘POGO’
N-64, guidance system for MX-775 Snark
N-65, 1954 Interceptor program, WS-201A
N-66, production for Motorola
N-67, YF-89D Scorpion
N-68, F-89D Scorpion
N-69, XSM-62 Snark, MX-775
N-70, Sextant
N-71, YF-89E Scorpion; J71 engine test bed
N-72, armed systems for SM-62A Snark
N-73, launch booster rockets for SM-62 Snark, MP-131
N-74, tactical transport
N-75, photographic recorder for SM-62 Snark
N-76, flight characteristics
N-77, jet engine
N-78, magnesium protection
N-79, plastic nose section
N-80, N-69 (MX-775) flight characteristics
N-81, F-89F Scorpion
N-82, YF-89F Scorpion
N-83, Martin turret
N-83, hydraulic liquid test
N-84, Martin turret
N-85, missile installation - Hughes GAR-1, GAR-2 Falcon (MX-904) on F-89H/J Scorpion
N-86, 30mm gun installation (Gun-Val)
N-87, T-110 rocket launcher (Gun-Val)
N-88, rocket-propelled carriage
N-89, deceleration engine
N-90, servo mechanism
N-91, linear deceleration
N-92, laminar flow system
N-93, hydraulic reservoir
N-94, U.S. Navy embarked fighter
N-95, arrester barrier tests
N-96, bomber defense missile (BDM)
N-97, laminar flow system
N-98, fuel system
N-99, titanium fuselage
N-100, zinc pressings
N-101, magnesium moldings
N-102, lightweight jet fighter - Fang
N-103, all-weather interceptor
N-104, molded door
N-105, T-110 rocket launcher
N-106, steel moldings
N-107, jet propelled carriage
N-108, no information
N-109, Project HEAT
N-110, installation of J71 in F-89D
N-111, YB-62 Snark
N-112, target designator, QB-62 Snark
N-113, Project OGRE
N-114, Project SUPER OGRE
N-115, SM-62 ballistic warhead
N-116, vibrations research
N-117, installation of E-9 fire control system in F-89D (MX-904)
N-118, vibration dampener
N-119, heating structures
N-120, no information
N-121, Project DELTA
N-122, reinforced wing testing
N-123, air intake research
N-124, pilotless reconnaissance air vehicles - RSM-62 and RB-62 Snark (MX-1960)
N-125, warhead studies
N-126, Project DELTA SCORPION, Long Range Interceptor Experimental
N-132, Strategic Fighter Aircraft
N-134, High Altitude Missile
N-135, Strategic Missile
N-138, All-Weather Interceptor, F-89H
N-144, Long Range Interceptor
N-149, Long Range Interceptor
N-156T, trainer
N-156C, YF-5A
N-156F, F-5B
N-160, Project BELL BOY
N-164, Long Range Interceptor (WS-202A) – F-108
N-167, Long Range Interceptor
N-176, Supersonic Interceptor
N-184, lightweight medium-range interceptor
N-250, BLC airplane (X-21) from Douglas B-66
N-251, V/STOL operational demonstration aircraft
N-252 to N-284
N-285, USN advanced jet trainer
N-286, USAF close support fighter bomber
N-287, Northrop-produced Hawker P-1127 Kestrel
N-288, manned bomber attack missile
N-289, V/STOL demonstrator
N-290, high-lift F-5
N-291, advanced F-5A tactical fighter
N-292, F-5 suck-in doors, two-position gear and 4,350-lb thrust engines
N-293, Condor
N-294, advanced USN jet trainer (F-5B)
N-295, F-5B USN trainer (magnesium to aluminum)
N-296, F-5B USN trainer (strength L.G.)
N-297, inflated MAP F-5 configuration
N-298, F-5A-40-NO modification program to F-5C Skoshi Tiger configuration
N-299, advanced F-5 installation of J-1A (J100) engine
N-300, F-5X (P-530) - stretched F-5E Tiger 2
N-301, modified F-5B for TAC companion to N-298
N-302, Norway follow-on (F-5A)
N-303, Norway follow-on (F-5B)
N-304, USAF reconnaissance F-5 (RF-5), s/n 6058
N-305, F-5C – follow-on to N-298 - Skoshi Tiger
N-306, follow-on to N-301 (F-5D)
N-307, USAF reconnaissance RF-5 for Military Assistance Program
N-308, A-X Program (see N-312, N-320)
N-309, NASA V/STOL jet operations research aircraft
N-310, Advanced Tactical Fighter, F-X Program (P-700)
N-311, F-5-21 prototype
N-312, turbofan-powered A-X, became N-320, then YA-9A
N-313, V/STOL tactical fighter
N-314, twin GE-15-powered advanced E/M fighter (P-600 YF-17 Cobra)
N-315, baseline advanced E/M fighter
N-316, single F100-powered advanced E/M fighter with double air inlets
N-317, single GE-15 powered advanced E/M fighter
N-318, twin non-afterburning GE-15 powered advanced E/M fighter (P-600 YF-17 Cobra)
N-319, single F100-powered advanced E/M fighter with single air inlet
N-320, A-X competitive airplane, became YA-9A
N-321, P-610 Lightweight Fighter
 

Stargazer2006

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Quite a few things missing here. Thought I'd shared my list already. Here it is (some stuff still missing, of course, but there are fewer gaps than above):

N-1M FLYING JEEP or JEEP experimental flying-wing
N-1 proposed two-engine flying wing bomber developed from N-1M
N-2B USAAF XP-56 BLACK BULLET experimental fighters (also found as NS-2 and "Silver Bullet") [MX-14]
N-3PB "NORSE SEAPLANE" single-engined patrol float-equipped patrol bomber for Norway
N-4 interceptor/pursuit project
N-5 interceptor/pursuit project
N-6 single-engined interceptor/fighter project for U.S. Navy
N-7 wind tunnel model (no other information)
N-8 USAAF XP-61 BLACK WIDOW two-engine night-interceptor prototype [MX-563]
NS-8 USAAF YP-61 BLACK WIDOW two-engine night-interceptor [MX-563]
NS-8A USAAF P-61A BLACK WIDOW two-engine night-interceptor [MX-563]
N-9M-1 experimental flying-wing demonstrator for B-35
N-9M-2 experimental flying-wing demonstrator for B-35
N-9MA experimental flying-wing demonstrator for B-35
N-9MB experimental flying-wing demonstrator for B-35, used for training
N-9E USAAF XB-35 FLYING WING experimental bomber [MX-140]
NS-9 USAAF YB-35 FLYING WING test aircraft
N-10 XT37-3 TURBODYNE turboprop developed with Hendy for use on proposed EB-35B; canceled [MX-562]
N-10 XT37 TURBODYNE engine evaluation and test by General Electric [MX-562A]
N-11 turbo-supercharger for XT37
N-12M FLYING WING glider, demonstrator for XP-79; concept demonstrator for the N-14 [MX-334]
N-12M ROCKET WING powered XP-79 demonstrator; former MX-334 fitted with Aerojet rocket engine [MX-324]
N-13 welding development for magnesium alloy
N-14 USAAF XP-79 experimental rocket-powered flying wing fighter [MX-365]
NS-14 USAAF XP-79A experimental flying wing fighter [MX-365]
NS-14B USAAF XP-79B FLYING RAM twin-turbojet-powered experimental flying wing fighter [MX-365]
N-15 twin-engine cargo plane project
N-16 USAAF JB-1 BAT (JET BOMB) single-engine winged bomb; nicknamed "Buzzbomb" [MX-543]
N-16 USAAF JB-10 BAT (JET BOMB) twin-engine winged bomb; nicknamed "Buzzbomb" [MX-544]
N-17 USAF XP-61E BLACK WIDOW, long range day fighter/bomber escort
N-18 JB-1B single engine jet bomb [MX-543]
N-19 USAAF XT37-N-1 TURBODYNE turboprop for USAAF and the EB-35B [MX-562B]
N-20 USAF XF-15/XF-15A/F-15A REPORTER photo-reconnaissance aircraft [MX-758]
N-21 USAF XP-61F BLACK WIDOW two-engined "night intruder" night interceptor version [MX-563]
N-22 water craft, no details
N-23 PIONEER experimental three-engined cargo aircraft
N-24 USAF XP-/XF-89 SCORPION experimental all-weather fighter/interceptor [MX-808]
N-25 USAF XSSM-A-3 SNARK experimental guided missile [WS-103A SAC Missile System] [MX-775A]
N-25B USAF (probably XSSM-A-5) BOOJUM missile (designation to be confirmed) [MX-775B]
N-26 USAF X(S)-4-NO SKYLANCER or BANTAM research aircraft [MX-810]
N-27 low-speed track unit deceleration system (air screws, propeller reverser) [MX-981]
N-28 Rand Research, no detail
N-29 USAF NEPA (Nuclear Energy Propulsion for Aircraft) nuclear propulsion system
N-30 fire combatant airborne vehicle (crash fire fighting)
N-31 medium bomber project
N-32 USAF YC-125 RAIDER three-engined experimental assault transport aircraft [MP-97]
N-33 castering gear (undercarriage)
N-34 USAF NEPA nuclear powered bomber project; renamed Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP)
N-35 USAF F-89A/B/C SCORPION all-weather fighter/interceptor [MP-80]
N-36 PIONEER three-engined cargo aircraft, cancelled version
N-37 USAF RB-49 FLYING WING photo reconnaissance aircraft
N-38 USAF RB-49 FLYING WING photo reconnaissance aircraft
N-39 USAF RB-35B FLYING WING (modified YB-35)
N-40 USAF YB-49 FLYING WING final prototype [MX-661]
N(S)-41 USAF YRB-49A FLYING WING reconnaissance bomber [MP-55]
N-42 Zero Length Launcher (ZELL) undercarriage [MP-131]
N-43 Test ZELL undercarriage for N-42 [MP-131]
N-44 Missile guidance system for SNARK [MX-775]
N-45 turbo test bench
N-46 USAF RB-49 FLYING WING reconnaissance aircraft
N-47 USAF RB-49 FLYING WING reconnaissance aircraft (difference unclear)
N-48 reductor test for RB-35 (or EB-35?)
N-49 USAF YF-89A SCORPION fighter/interceptor
N-50 USAF YB-49 FLYING WING jet-engined bomber [MP-56]
N-51 USAF YB-35B FLYING WING conversion [MP-48]
N-52 USAF YRB-49A FLYING WING reconnaissance bomber [MP-55]
N-53 USAF interceptor
N-54 USAF RF-89A SCORPION reconnaissance aircraft
N-55 patrol aircraft
N-56 dielectric panel
N-57 launch recorder for SNARK [MP-131]
N-58 ejection seat
N-59 carrier-based bomber airplane
N-60 USN anti-submarine warfare airplane
?? USAF RIM-35A/RTM-35A
N-61 polar shelter (or U.S. Navy fighter aircraft?)
N-62 moulded aerofoil (or polar shelter?)
N-63/A US Navy TAILSITTER VTOL convoy fighter project basically similar to Lockheed's XFV-1
N-64 guidance system for SNARK [MX-775]
N-65 USAF interceptor program [WS-201A]
N-66 production for Motorola, no details
N-67 USAF YF-89D SCORPION all-weather fighter/interceptor (former F-89B converted)
N-68 USAF F-89D SCORPION all-weather fighter/interceptor
N-69A USAF XB-62 SNARK missile [MX-775]
N-69B USAF XB-62 SNARK missile [MX-775]
N-69C USAF XB-62/XSM-62 warhead delivery test vehicle
N-69D USAF XSM-62A SNARK missile, underwing fuel tanks to test the guidance system at full range
N-69E USAF YSM-62A SNARK missile, served as the prototype of the production SNARK
N-69 USAF SM-62A SNARK production version
N-70 sextant
N-71 USAF YF-89E SCORPION prototype (F-89C s/n 50-752 converted as YJ71-1-3 turbojet testbed)
N-71 USAF F-89E SCORPION all-weather fighter/interceptor (also F-89G?)
N-72 armed systems for SM-62A SNARK [MX-775]
N-73 Zero Length Launcher (ZELL) launch booster rockets for SNARK [MP-131]
N-74 tactical transport project
N-75 photographic recorder for SNARK [MP-131]
N-76 flight characteristics
N-77 jet engine
N-78 magnesium protection
N-79 plastic nose section
N-80 N-69 flight characteristics [MP-131]
N-81 USAF F-89F SCORPION project with wider fuselage, enlarged wing, etc.
N-82 USAF YF-89F SCORPION prototype; cancelled because of the F-89's structural problems
N-83 hydraulic liquid test
N-84 Martin turret
N-85 missile installation (installation of Hughes GAR-1/GAR-2 on F-89G?/H/J?) [MX-904]
N-86 USAF GUN-VAL 30mm gun installation
N-87 USAF GUN-VAL T-110 Rocket launcher
N-88 rocket-propelled carriage
N-89 deceleration engine
N-90 servo-mechanism
N-91 linear deceleration
N-92 laminar flow system
N-93 hydraulic reservoir
N-94 USN embarked fighter project for same requirement as F8U's; also N-94A/B/C [OS-130]
N-95 arrester barrier tests
N-96 Bomber Defense Missile (BDM) (on behalf of Cornell Aeronautical Laboratories?)
N-97 laminar flow system
N-98 fuel system
N-99 titanium fuselage
N-100 zinc pressings
N-101 magnesium moldings (also found for F-89D and F-89G by mistake)
N-102 FANG lightweight jet fighter proposal for USAF competition
N-103 All-weather USAF interceptor project
N-104 molded door (for train?)
N-105 T-110 Rocket launcher
N-106 steel moldings
N-107 jet-propelled carriage

N-109 Project "HEAT" (no details)
N-110 Installation of J71 engine in a F-89D
N-111 YB-62 SNARK air-to-air missile
N-112 QB-62 SNARK target designator
N-113 project "OGRE"
N-114 project "SUPER OGRE"
N-115 ballistic warhead for MX-775 SNARK
N-116 vibrations research
N-117 installation of E-9 fire control system in F-89D [MX-904]
N-118 vibration dampener
N-119 heating structures

N-121 project "DELTA"
N-122 reinforced wing testing
N-123 air intake research
N-124 USAF RB-62/RSM-62 SNARK pilotless photo-reconnaissance version, cancelled [MX-1960]
N-125 warhead studies
N-126 series of long-range interception bomber projects, the first being a modified F-89D
N-126 DELTA SCORPION long-range interception bomber (LRI-X) projects, with new delta wing, longer fuselage
N-126A improved version of DELTA SCORPION with different engine
N-126B same as above, a DELTA SCORPION with different engine
N-127 heating system
N-128 Uniflite system
N-129 cooling system
N-130 slotted wing
N-131 missile
N-132 strategic fighter aircraft
N-133 vibration research
N-134 high-altitude missile
N-135 strategic missile
N-136 heating system fuel
N-137 USAF TS6-6010 70mm rocket launcher
N-138 USAF F-89H SCORPION all-weather fighter/interceptor with "Falcon" missiles
N-139 USN flexible flight-deck project
N-140 accelerator
N-141 USAF F-89 SCORPION all-weather interceptor (projected variant)
N-142 target-towing system
N-143 "Redstone" computer
N-144 huge long-distance interceptor project developed from N-126 design
N-145 FFAR rocket launcher
N-146 Launcher, radar and firecontrol system for the XM3 Hawk missile made by Raytheon
N-147 weapons studies
N-148 counter measures systems for bombers
N-149 long-range interceptor, development from N-126
N-150 spin-stabilized 2.75-inch (70mm) rocket, "DERVISH" program (air-to-air and surface-to-air)
N-151 XQ-4A missile (Northrop Q-4A drone modified to test Boeing IM-99 Bomarc J83-engine ?)
N-152 Convair carriage
N-153 gun mounting
N-154 USN McDonnell F4H-1 PHANTOM
N-155 target-towing aircraft
N-156T from design PD-2879D; became USAF T-38 TALON advanced trainer
N-156F FREEDOM FIGHTER company demonstrators
N-156F USAF YF-5A FREEDOM FIGHTER lightweight fighter [SS-420A]
N-156A USAF F-5A FREEDOM FIGHTER
N-156B USAF F-5B FREEDOM FIGHTER
N-156C USAF RF-5A FREEDOM FIGHTER
N-156NN T-tail Naval version; from design PD-2706
N-156D carrier-borne fighter developed from N-156NN. Later became N-285B
N-156E lightweight jet fighter using CF-700 engines
N-156TX project "TALLY-HO", no details
N-157 equipment for Northrop (Ventura) GAM-67 Crossbow anti-radar missile
N-158 winch for North American B-45
N-159 titanium reinforcements
N-160 project "BELL-BOY", no details (also given for USAF F-89J all-weather fighter/interceptor)


N-164 Long Range Interceptor, competitor of F-108 [WS-202A]
N-165 hypersonic reconnaissance vehicle proposal for USAF [WS-118P]

N-167 large T-tailed, two-engine (four-engine?) Mach 2 interceptor project for LRI-X competition

N-173 hypersonic reconnaissance vehicle proposal for USAF [WS-118P]

N-176 delta-winged, eight-turbine Mach 2 medium-range interceptor project

N-180 observation aircraft proposal for US Navy

N-184 lightweight medium-range interceptor project

N-205B Upgraded T-38 as a "Space Trainer"; max. altitude 50 miles, top speed Mach 3+

N-250 X-21 LFC experimental aircraft, modified from Douglas WB-66D
N-251 V/STOL operational demonstration aircraft

N-267 VTOL T-38 derivative for research purposes

N-285B projected naval version of F-5, development of N-156D; offered to USN and Australian Navy
N-286 projected stretched version of F-5E
N-287 Northrop-produced Hawker P-1127 Kestrel
N-288 manned bomber attack missile
N-289 V/STOL demonstrator
N-290 high-lift F-5
N-291 advanced F-5A tactical fighter
N-292 F-5 suck-in doors, two-position gear and 4,350-lb thrust engines
N-293 CONDOR, no details (a "Northrop Condor" is described as a "two-person flyer" in a novel)
N-294 advanced USN jet trainer (F-5B)
N-295 F-5B USN trainer (magnesium to aluminum)
N-296 F-5B USN trainer (strength L.G.)
N-297 inflated MAP F-5 configuration
N-298 F-5A-40-NO modification program to F-5C Skoshi Tiger configuration
N-299 advanced F-5 installation of J-1A (J100) engine
N-300 stretched version of F-5E; preliminary project for P-530 fighter
N-301 modified F-5B for TAC companion to N-298
N-302 Norway follow-on (F-5A)
N-303 Norway follow-on (F-5B)
N-304 USAF reconnaissance F-5 (RF-5), s/n 6058
N-305 F-5C – follow-on to N-298 - Skoshi Tiger
N-306 follow-on to N-301 (F-5D)
N-307 USAF reconnaissance RF-5 for Military Assistance Program
N-308 A-X Program (see N-312, N-320)
N-309 NASA V/STOL jet operations research aircraft
N-310 Advanced Tactical Fighter, F-X Program (P-700)
N-311 F-5-21 prototype
N-312 turbofan-powered A-X, became N-320, then YA-9A
N-313 V/STOL tactical fighter
N-314 twin GE-15-powered advanced E/M fighter (P-600 YF-17 COBRA)
N-315 baseline advanced E/M fighter
N-316 single F100-powered advanced E/M fighter with double air inlets
N-317 single GE-15 powered advanced E/M fighter
N-318 twin non-afterburning GE-15 powered advanced E/M fighter (P-600 YF-17 COBRA)
N-319 single F100-powered advanced E/M fighter with single air inlet
N-320 A-X competitive airplane, became YA-9A
N-321 P-610 Lightweight Fighter
 

Antonio

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Great work, thanks for sharing! Could the B-2 be in the N-3XX range?
 

Stargazer2006

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pometablava said:
Great work, thanks for sharing! Could the B-2 be in the N-3XX range?
Thanks my friend. No, the B-2 is certainly part of the new numbering system that was apparently set up early in the 1990s. I only have three designations from this:

N-14 'SENIOR ICE' pre-B-2 bomber project for USAF's ATB program
N-19 found in NASA records as related to B-2 Inlet / Airframe development
N-39 found in NASA records as related to B-2 Jet Effects development

Other Northrop designation lists include the P-series of designs:

P-530 USAF/USN COBRA fighter proposal; evolved from N-300
P-530-2 first COBRA design to have the two vertical tails of the later F-17/F-18
P-600 USAF/USN fighter proposal for Light Weight Fighter competition and YF-17A COBRA prototypes
P-610 COBRA intermediary variant; single engined P-530 derivative for Light Weight Fighter competition
P-630 USN F-18 HORNET fighter, production version of YF-18 (also known as MDD 267)
P-700 Advanced Tactical Fighter, F-X Program

Non-standard designations found include:

TSC-1 proposal for JAST fighter competition
TSC-2 proposal for JAST fighter competition
TSC-3A proposal for JAST fighter competition
RPTA-1 tracking aid system
NROC-2 (no detail)
DP117K USAF YF-23A BLACK WIDOW II fighter prototypes
 

aim9xray

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A few corrections, amplifications and a story or two.

1) It is much more likely that the model numbers NASA Langley associated with the B-2 are actually the numbers assigned to the wind tunnel models for contractual tracking and ID purposes - after all you couldn't put "Exact 1/12th Scale B-2 Intake Wind Tunnel Model" on the model crate packing sheet - at least in 1983!

2) There are some indications that model and/or project numbers used by ATD and B-2 Divisions (and predecessor organizations) were assigned out of a sparsely populated list, as part of the extreme security measures used by the programs. (A related bogus designation is the "SP-3/ZSR-63" EW system related to the B-2).

3). A story...the "P-xxx" designations of the early 70's started as an informal joke among several members of the advanced design group. Since there was no time (or budget) to pursue a particular advanced F-5 derivative design during normal working hours, members met at 5:30 in the evening to work on the project. This became known as Project 5:30, or later, P-530. This sequence continued on for a while for related projects until the YF-17 contract was awarded. This story may -or- may not true but it was related by one of those who was there!

4) The classic "N" series of project designations appear to have been pretty much abandoned in the 1980s as those who enforced the original drawing system retired, died or left the company. Acronyms (such as TSC) appear to have replaced the PD drawing number system and applied to the particular project. This also served the purpose of obfuscating the number and type of preliminary studies - both for competitive and national security reasons.

5) The use of "N" project/program designators appears to only have applied to those efforts at the Hawthorne (Aircraft) Division. Spin-offs such as Nortronics (later Northrop Electronics) and Electro-Mechanical Division went their own way as the corporation grew decentralized. An example is the N-64 guidance system for the Snark. This project was one of the efforts that led to the establishment of Nortronics who named later developments the NAS-xx (Northrop Astroinertial System) series. Notable applications were the:

NAS-14: SR-71A
NAS-21: TR-1A (U-2R)
NAS-26: B-1B (A/C #9 only, for SRAM launch navigation IV&V)
and last of the line:
NAS-27: B-2A (codenamed as the NSS - Navigation Sub-System).

6) This is all based on memory, sourced by rumor and heresay [grin]. So, trust, but verify!

Stargazer - don't take this as criticism - keep up the hard word! But please don't use made-up designations or abbreviations as MDD for McDonnell Douglas - others will source from you and soon it will become internet canon such as the "F-107A Ultra Sabre".

Edit: typos.
 

Stargazer2006

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Thank you very much for all the insight (the P-530 story, in particular, is hilarious)... and for the tip. I will try to remember that but it's true that for me, at least, "MDD" has indeed been "canon" for years and it's a habit that will be hard to get rid of... ::). Are you actually saying that this acronym was never used by ANYONE but myself? Ouch!
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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"MDD" is commonly used on the internet, but McAir (McDonnell Aircraft Division) was the official abbreviation.
 

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McAir meant McDonnell Aircraft Corporation previous to the merger. -SP
 

aim9xray

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Steve is right; McAir appears to have been the standard internally. There was, no doubt, a corporate "style guide" for usage, I am certain that we'll see one up on eBay eventually.

But while McAir was used in letters and publications, it was common to see MacAir used outside the company. This may have been due to the phonetic spelling of the name, helped along by founder James McDonnell's calling himself "Old Mac". After the merger, it was common the hear the short name McAuto or McAstro used to refer to the subsidiaries McDonnell Douglas Automation Company and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, respectively. Sometimes the term MacDac was used by outsiders, too. (Heck, Air Progress ran a article in the early Seventies proposing nicknames for for companies and products; among these were the Lostdeed TriFarce and the McGuzzle Does-less DC-10!)

As to the MDD appellation; I guess that I'm more of an interwebz noob than I thought :eek:. My recollection is that after the merger, they used MDC (McDonnell Douglas Corporation) - this may also have been the NYSE stock ticker symbol for the company. (If you catch me using NOC for Northrop or Northrop Grumman - that's where that comes from.)

Caution: Editorial Opinion ahead!
Should the acronym be MDD or MDC for the company? (A corollary is the ME-109 versus BF-109 question...) My feeling is that we should use the nomenclature used at the time by those who were there. If you want to rename the company after the fact, that is your choice - but you will get some odd looks from those who were there! (...and don't even get started with retronaming such as the Boeing P-51... !)

An example of this is the piece of equipment used on the F-14 to interface the Phoenix missile to the aircraft belly stations. The Hughes propaganda which was repeated everywhere (Aviation Week, particularly) was to call it a "pallet". But if you were on the flightline, that was a "weapons rail". That's what the Navy nomenclature was and that's what it was called in the NATOPS publications. To call it a pallet on the flightline immediately marked you as an uninformed outsider. (Don't ask how I know.)

Well, that was my two cents. Again, Stargazer - please keep up the hard work. My criticism is meant only to better the product, not as a personal attack.

...we now return you to the previously scheduled Northrop thread...
 

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Hi All!

N-191---long range high speed unmanned bomber
N-201---long range missile fighter system
N-214---"Optimum" interceptor weapon system study
N-322---P-610, single-seat version
 

BillRo

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To add a little to this, I had a structural design background and in 1976 I joined the Northrop Aircraft Div. F-18 Configuration group from F-5 and after a year doing structural design finally got back to doing configuration. As the F-18A design froze we evolved into configuring the F-18L, Northrop's Land Based mod of the F-18A under Lee Begin and Ed Jacobs. This was the time when we were trying to sell to countries like Spain and Canada and had the full-size articulated mock-up for show and tell. In about 1980 the original Bob Sandusky Advanced Design disappeared to work on Low Observable projects and a new white world Advanced Projects group came about. Between 1980 and 1985 I was involved as manager doing Advanced F-18 and F-5 Configuration design as well as all the configuration designs for AF and NASA contracts for different project engineers. We inherited the book where the N-XXX configuration numbers were recorded. I am sure the black world group started a new one, which is why you see those low N-XX numbers repeating.

I obviously cannot remember those designs and N numbers but perhaps that book is somewhere in the Northrop archives. The group was still going in 1985 and was up to at least N371 when I left to join the Tacit Rainbow missle program at the Northrop Ventura drone division.
Photo is from 1982 with Compact Efficient fighter on the board and a model of N344? as far as I can tell.

BillRo
 

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overscan (PaulMM)

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BillRo said:
To add a little to this, I had a structural design background and in 1976 I joined the Northrop Aircraft Div. F-18 Configuration group from F-5 and after a year doing structural design finally got back to doing configuration. As the F-18A design froze we evolved into configuring the F-18L, Northrop's Land Based mod of the F-18A under Lee Begin and Ed Jacobs. This was the time when we were trying to sell to countries like Spain and Canada and had the full-size articulated mock-up for show and tell. In about 1980 the original Bob Sandusky Advanced Design disappeared to work on Low Observable projects and a new white world Advanced Projects group came about. Between 1980 and 1985 I was involved as manager doing Advanced F-18 and F-5 Configuration design as well as all the configuration designs for AF and NASA contracts for different project engineers. We inherited the book where the N-XXX configuration numbers were recorded. I am sure the black world group started a new one, which is why you see those low N-XX numbers repeating.

I obviously cannot remember those designs and N numbers but perhaps that book is somewhere in the Northrop archives. The group was still going in 1985 and was up to at least N371 when I left to join the Tacit Rainbow missle program at the Northrop Ventura drone division.
Photo is from 1982 with Compact Efficient fighter on the board and a model of N344? as far as I can tell.

BillRo
Great to hear these kind of details from the people that worked on this stuff. Thanks again for sharing.
 

AM

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Hi all!

N-381 -Multi-role carrier-based flying wing aircraft

From Midland's "Secret Projects" series
 

Stargazer2006

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According to NASA's CRGIS website, the Northrop B-2 Spirit's inhouse designations were "Model 19" and "Model 39" (presumably N-19 and N-39).

16-Foot Transonic Tunnel

Test #351 1980 Pressure Model (Northrop Model 19 - B-2 Inlet / Airframe)
Test #356 1981 Pressure Model (Northrop Model 39 - B-2 Jet Effects)
Test #363 1981 Pressure Model (Northrop Model 19 - B-2 Inlet / Airframe Model)
Test #369 1982 Pressure Model IV (Northrop Model 19 - B-2 Inlet / Airframe Model)
Test #375 1983 Theory Verification Model (Phase V) Northrop Model 39 (B-2 Jet Effects Model)
Test #379 1983 Pressure Model (Phase VI) (Berrier, Bare, Leavitt) Northrop Model 19 (B-2 Inlet / Airframe Model)

http://crgis.ndc.nasa.gov/historic/Additional_Photos_for_16-Foot_Transonic_Tunnel_Ordered_by_Tunnel_Test_Log
 

aim9xray

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As noted earlier in this thread:

aim9xray said:
1) It is much more likely that the model numbers NASA Langley associated with the B-2 are actually the numbers assigned to the wind tunnel models for contractual tracking and ID purposes - after all you couldn't put "Exact 1/12th Scale B-2 Intake Wind Tunnel Model" on the model crate packing sheet - at least in 1983!
I feel it highly unlikely that these were assigned "N" project numbers (in the Northrop 1930s to 1970s program/project listing). I believe that these were the tracking numbers (for lack of a better term) rather than anything else.
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Stargazer2006 said:
According to NASA's CRGIS website, the Northrop B-2 Spirit's inhouse designations were "Model 19" and "Model 39" (presumably N-19 and N-39).

16-Foot Transonic Tunnel

Test #351 1980 Pressure Model (Northrop Model 19 - B-2 Inlet / Airframe)
Test #356 1981 Pressure Model (Northrop Model 39 - B-2 Jet Effects)
Test #363 1981 Pressure Model (Northrop Model 19 - B-2 Inlet / Airframe Model)
Test #369 1982 Pressure Model IV (Northrop Model 19 - B-2 Inlet / Airframe Model)
Test #375 1983 Theory Verification Model (Phase V) Northrop Model 39 (B-2 Jet Effects Model)
Test #379 1983 Pressure Model (Phase VI) (Berrier, Bare, Leavitt) Northrop Model 19 (B-2 Inlet / Airframe Model)

http://crgis.ndc.nasa.gov/historic/Additional_Photos_for_16-Foot_Transonic_Tunnel_Ordered_by_Tunnel_Test_Log
As Craig says, this makes no sense. The two model numbers are specifically associated with two physical models - a B-2 inlet/airframe model (19) and a B-2 Jet effects model (39). These will be designations for the models specifically not the aircraft.
 

Stargazer2006

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aim9xray said:
I feel it highly unlikely that these were assigned "N" project numbers (in the Northrop 1930s to 1970s program/project listing). I believe that these were the tracking numbers (for lack of a better term) rather than anything else.
Did I ever say that the numbers belonged to the "historical" N- list?? The ''SENIOR ICE' program has been quoted as being the N-14, and it is obvious that this is a new numbering system!!

This being said, I agree that the term "model" can be understood in two different ways and that concluding to these being N- numbers was a little far-fetched of me. Still, the page says "Northrop Model 19" and "Northrop Model 39", which makes it impossible for these numbers to refer to NASA model numbers. Perhaps there were as many as 40 scale models of the B-2, and they picked only two for these tests?
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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THe N-14 designation (not officially confirmed, I believe) dates from the same timeframe as these two Model numbers. Most likely it applies to the whole B-2 program.

It doesn't fit that these others are N- series numbers. The N-14 designation itself would probably have secret in the time frame the models were tested in, as were all other identifiers for the program. Therefore a number was assigned to each model. It doesn't really matter whether it was Northrop or NASA who invented the model numbers - it might have been Northrop. There is also no reason to suppose 40 models were built - the two numbers could have been allocated randomly.

It hardly seems likely Northrop would have created 3 different designs for one program in one year, and tested the inlets of one design, and the exhaust of another, for several years.
 

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Worked on part of the B-2(sensor system) and we only knew the client was called "Semsel". Only following rollout was it made plain to us it was Northrop, and the B-2. Super compartmentization of knowledge on who did what. Doubt a Northrop corporate number for the whole program exixts.
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Serendipity...


Read this, very apposite to topic.


http://crgis.ndc.nasa.gov/crgis/images/2/23/B-2_DELIVERYTESTING.pdf



B-2 DELIVERY/TESTING

GENERAL

The first B-2 test was conducted in the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel in December 1980. Security was very tight and very few people knew what was being tested. I don’t know for sure but I don’t believe that the Langley Center Director or even the Division Chief knew that the test was being conducted. At that time, the Branch Head accepted or rejected outside tests on a case-by-case basis (he also supervised all engineering personnel and controlled the tunnel budget). The tunnel logbook entry (Test 351) for the test was entered as “Pressure Model”. A list of 16’TT B-2 tunnel entries is provided in Table 1. Only people who were required to visually see the model (engineer and technician test crews) and the Facility Managers were briefed to see the model. Other personnel (instrumentation and data reduction specialists, for ex.) were briefed to a lower security level and the model was covered and closed-circuit televisions were shut off when they were allowed in the area. Included with the Northrop Grumman test personnel was an entire cadre of security personnel who handled security issues. Each piece of paper generated (no matter how small) such as data, shift notes, instrumentation hook-up sheets, run sheets, etc. was collected at the end of each shift, stamped with a classification marking, and logged into an item inventory. All NASA hard-disk drives, primarily for data storage at that time (no PC’s were used), were replaced with Northrop-Grumman inventoried equipment. Except for the test section entry door, all tunnel entry doors were locked with special locks and a guard manned the test section entry door at all times (three shifts). At the conclusion of each test, all documentation (notes/data/photos/hard drives/etc) were removed from the facility and taken back to company facilities. As a result, except for participants’ memories and cryptic tunnel log book entries, no official records of these tests exist at Langley.

FIRST MODEL DELIVERY

The first B-2 model to be tested in the 16’TT was an inlet model and was delivered to Langley by a special USAF C-130 flight in the middle of the night. The original plan was for the C-130 to be taxied from the USAF side of the field to the NASA hanger where the 16’TT night-shift crew was waiting on it. We had made arrangements for a forklift (one of 16’TT technicians was trained in the forklift operation) to unload the model and carry it over to the 16’TT JETF (Bldg. 1234) where it was to be assembled. Unfortunately, no one had told the USAF air traffic controller what the plan was and he would not give the C-130 (now sitting in idle at the end of the runway) permission to taxi over to the NASA hanger. I don’t know if the aircraft commander received permission to sit at the end of the runway to wait for us or just stalled the air traffic controller but we drove the forklift to the end of the runway and unloaded the model there (my memory says that the C-130 never shut his engines down). The model was then transported by forklift back to NASA bldg. 1234. Building 1234 had been prepared for the effort by having special locks installed on all doors and all windows painted over. Being an inlet model, the outboard wing panels were unimportant to the test effort and thus were left off the model. Of course, at the time, even the NASA personnel who were briefed to the program had no idea what they looked like or even that they were missing; this made for a very unusual looking model. Once the model was assembled and checked out, a process that took at least a week or more of two-shift operation, it had fake vertical tails put on it. The model and fake tails were covered with a black cloth and the assembled model was moved from JETF to 16’TT in the middle of the night at a specific time that was coordinated to ensure that no Russian satellites were overhead during the move. Once inside the 16’TT, the fake tails were removed and the model was installed in the test section.

ONE MORE TRY

After the first model delivery by USAF C-130, subsequent model deliveries were made by commercial flights to Patrick Henry International Airport. However, a security team had to ride with the model and supervise loading, unloading, and transportation from a Northrop facility to 16’TT. On one of the deliveries, I rode as a passenger with a NASA security agent in a NASA van that was to be used for transporting the model from the airport to 16’TT. We took the back route (134 to 17 to Oriana Road) to the airport without incident. At the airport, we loaded the model into the van and headed back to Langley by the same route with a large caravan of vehicles (NASA van and about five rental cars for the Northrop security, technician, and engineering personnel). However, between the times we arrived at the airport and started back to Langley, the local police had set up a driver’s license checkpoint on Oriana Road and the NASA security agent had left his wallet (and license) in his office. As we approached the checkpoint, the security agent tried to get me to slide under him into the driver’s seat, which I refused to do. Upon reaching the checkpoint, the security agent waved his NASA agent shield and mumbled something about being on “Official Government Business” along with the caravan of cars following us; the police waved us through without asking to see a diver’s license and the rest of the trip back to Langley was uneventful.

Table 2 provides a list of other tests that occurred after the B-2 tests and had cryptic entries in the tunnel log book.

TABLE 1.- List of B-2 model entries in the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel.

Test Number Tunnel Log Entry Date Northrop Model Number Model Description Test Hours
351 Pressure Model 11/12/80 to 12/11/80 19 Inlet Airframe Integration 80
356 Pressure Model 3/3/81 to 3/16/81 39 Jet Effects 80
363 Pressure Model 11/15/81 to 12/9/81 19 Inlet Airframe Integration 96
369 Pressure Model IV 7/1/82 to 7/23/82 19 Inlet Airframe Integration 120
375 Theory Verification Model (Phase V) 6/13/83 to 6/24/83 39 Jet Effects 98
379 Pressure Model (Phase VI) 11/10/83 to 12/9/83 19 Inlet Airframe Integration 120


Table 2.- List of 16’TT tests that were entered cryptically in the tunnel log book. PAB = Propulsion Aerodynamics Branch, BEN refers Ben Franco (the lead Northrop test engineer), ATF = Advanced Tactical Fighter, A-12 was a Navy attack vehicle that was subsequently cancelled.

Test Number Tunnel Log Entry Date Real model description
404 PAB-N 3/11/86 to 3/21/86 Northrop ATF nozzles
410 PAB-1 12/10/86 to 1/22/87 Faceted nozzles
415 BEN-6 5/4/87 to 6/5/87 A-12 model
421 PAB-001 1/25/88 to 3/29/88 Inlet model
 

Stargazer2006

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Very interesting, Paul. Thanks a lot for sharing!
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Incidentally, this makes it clear that NASA will not have any pictures of these models from the testing.
 
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