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Navy Researching Guided Hypervelocity Rounds from Standard Deck Guns

bobbymike

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http://news.usni.org/2015/06/01/navy-researching-firing-mach-5-guided-round-from-standard-deck-guns

The U.S. Navy’s deck guns could take on new relevance if ongoing tests to fire a guided round at five times the speed of sound from their muzzles are successful, USNI News has learned.

Using rounds initially designed for the service’s emerging electromagnetic railgun, Naval Sea Systems Command are now in early testing phases of using the planned hyper velocity projectile (HVPs) with the service’s existing gunpowder-based deck guns found on almost every U.S. Navy surface ship, NAVSEA told USNI News.


Gun powder based so a new energetic propellant involved?
 

TomS

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Basically, it's a common sub-caliber flight body that can be saboted into 5-inch, 155mm, and railgun packages. The projectile is only about 28 pounds (15 pounds payload), so ~40% the weight of a full-caliber 127mm projectile. That, plus a super low-drag configuration can achieve the specified range without really exotic propellants.

The BAE data sheet (attached) credits it with the following range, depending on the gun it's fired from:

> 50 nmi (93 km) from Mk 45 Mod 4
> 40 nmi (74 km) from Mk 45 Mod 2
> 70 nmi (130 km) from AGS
> 43 nmi (80 km) from 155-mm Tube Artillery
> 100 nmi (185 km) from EM Railgun
 

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bobbymike

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TomS said:
Basically, it's a common sub-caliber flight body that can be saboted into 5-inch, 155mm, and railgun packages. The projectile is only about 28 pounds (15 pounds payload), so ~40% the weight of a full-caliber 127mm projectile. That, plus a super low-drag configuration can achieve the specified range without really exotic propellants.

The BAE data sheet (attached) credits it with the following range, depending on the gun it's fired from:

> 50 nmi (93 km) from Mk 45 Mod 4
> 40 nmi (74 km) from Mk 45 Mod 2
> 70 nmi (130 km) from AGS
> 43 nmi (80 km) from 155-mm Tube Artillery
> 100 nmi (185 km) from EM Railgun
I wonder if you could load a bunch of these on a missile, like mini-MIRVS, and send them even further than a 'gun' would allow??
 

sferrin

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bobbymike said:
TomS said:
Basically, it's a common sub-caliber flight body that can be saboted into 5-inch, 155mm, and railgun packages. The projectile is only about 28 pounds (15 pounds payload), so ~40% the weight of a full-caliber 127mm projectile. That, plus a super low-drag configuration can achieve the specified range without really exotic propellants.

The BAE data sheet (attached) credits it with the following range, depending on the gun it's fired from:

> 50 nmi (93 km) from Mk 45 Mod 4
> 40 nmi (74 km) from Mk 45 Mod 2
> 70 nmi (130 km) from AGS
> 43 nmi (80 km) from 155-mm Tube Artillery
> 100 nmi (185 km) from EM Railgun
I wonder if you could load a bunch of these on a missile, like mini-MIRVS, and send them even further than a 'gun' would allow??
Said it before. Pack something like an ATACMs with some mini-MIRVS for taking out things like S-400 sites. (Though they wouldn't really be RVs so much at guided bomblets.)
 

bring_it_on

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Navy Quietly Fires 20 Hyper Velocity Projectiles Through Destroyer’s Deckgun


Last summer USS Dewey (DDG-105) fired 20 hyper velocity projectiles (HVP) from a standard Mk 45 5-inch deck gun in a quiet experiment that’s set to add new utility to the weapon found on almost every U.S. warship, officials familiar with the test have told USNI News.

The test, conducted by the Navy and the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2018 international exercise, was part of a series of studies to prove the Navy could turn the more than 40-year-old deck gun design into an effective and low-cost weapon against cruise missiles and larger unmanned aerial vehicles.
 

bring_it_on

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Request for Information: Solicitation Number: N0017819Q3002 Dated 12/18/18

The Navy is seeking a battery solution to meet the size, power and storage requirements against a requirement set that is somewhat fluid.The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) on behalf of the Major Program Manager, Surface Ship Weapons (PEO IWS 3.0) is seeking information from industry for a battery solution to support advancing US Navy technology for guided projectiles. The US Navy is actively developing gun-launched, guided projectile systems to engage a variety of targets, both with and without end-of-mission seeker operations. The seekers under consideration vary drastically in their power requirements. With multiple mission timelines and significant seeker power draw at the end of the mission, the power profile requirement to suit all scenarios can be complex.

The response should include:

1. BATTERY TYPE. The US Navy is interested in a variety of battery solutions, including but not limited to active lithium cell, thermal reserve cells and liquid reserve cells. The Navy is interested in techniques for extending the shelf life of active batteries, as well as reserve batteries that are gun-launch activated. For proposed lithium batteries, status of compliance with NAVSEA TM-S9310-AQ-SAF-010 should be described.

2. BATTERY SIZE. Guided projectile designs have significant volumetric limitations, and all volume is bought at the expense of warhead size. Generally, the maximum volume allocated to the Power System is defined by a cylindrical space 2 inches in diameter and 4.5 inches long. Flexibility in packaging and the ability to inhabit odd volumes would be considered of benefit. Responses should include details on battery dimensions.


3. BATTERY POWER. The power required to energize passive, semi-active and active seekers can vary over multiple orders of magnitude. Before the seeker is activated there is a baseline power expense from mission computer, Radio Frequency uplink or Global Positioning System, and control actuation that is present from launch and up to and during the seeker power draw. Responses should include battery power output capability and duration.


4. TECHNOLOGY READINESS. Responses should include an assessment of the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and reliability of the battery. TRL claims should be substantiated, where possible, including descriptions of any analyses and test and evaluation. Responses should also include substantiated Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) of the battery and its subcomponents. Details of previously conducted test events and results should be included. Events planned in the next 12 months with the goal of improving TRL and MRL should be described.


5. DEVELOPMENT COST AND SCHEDULE. Responses should include a schedule and cost estimate, with the basis for the estimate, (in Microsoft Excel format) to mature the battery to a TRL 8/MRL 7. A cost estimate should include, at a minimum, engineering labor for design and development, hardware and software costs, assembly, integration and test, and test and evaluation. Assume 50 units to be delivered to the US Navy for qualification testing.


6. PRODUCTION COST. Responses should include an average Unit Production Cost Estimate for a quantity of 10,000 units over 5 years. Also responses should include the annual production profile with corresponding risk assessment (distribution).
The Government may elect to visit, or host a visit, from any potential sources following the market survey. The Government may request additional information upon review. Any results of any Government analysis will not be provided.
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=333c7d31418dfdb13bbb12008126abbb&tab=core&_cview=0
 

stealthflanker

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reading the news.. and finally i learned something that hypervelocity doesn't always mean being hypersonic.

https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/ar310-25.pdf
 

sferrin

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stealthflanker said:
reading the news.. and finally i learned something that hypervelocity doesn't always mean being hypersonic.

https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/ar310-25.pdf
I wonder how they justified it.
 
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