CSBA - Maritime Competition In A Mature Precision-Strike Regime

bobbymike

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Forthcoming study from CSBA, story from Breaking Defense:

WASHINGTON: The seas are shrinking. As missiles grow longer-ranged and more precise, as sensors grow ever sharper, there are ever fewer places for a ship to hide. “A ship’s a fool to fight a fort,” goes an old naval adage, because a land base can carry more ammunition and armor than anything that floats. Admirals have always been uneasy about bringing their fleets in range of shore-based weapons. But what does the US Navy do when those weapons can find you hundreds or thousands of miles out to sea?

Fig 10 China-USThat’s the question posed by Andrew Krepinevich in his forthcoming study, Maritime Competition In A Mature Precision-Strike Regime. (Krepinevich gave Breaking Defense an exclusive advance copy and answered our questions about it at length). The thinktank Krepinevich heads, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, has long led the way on the concepts called anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) and Air-Sea Battle, which wrestle with the rising power of China and other countries to keep US forces at a distance. His new study carries this earlier work to its logical conclusion: a world in which both sides have built the wide-area network of spy satellites, drones, bombers, and missiles that is currently a US monopoly – the “mature precision-strike regime” of the title.

It’s a world in which naval warfare is very different — indeed, in which land-based forces can do so much damage to fleets that the conflict isn’t purely “naval” anymore. (That’s why the study uses “maritime” instead). The World War II parallel is not Midway, where US and Japanese carriers struggled to find each other in the vast Pacific: It’s the Mediterranean, where both Axis and Allied ships were easily found and ravaged by land-based bombers. The difference is that modern technology effectively shrinks the Pacific to the size of the Mediterranean.

“In the Med [in World War II], you have these no man’s lands where it becomes very difficult to operate on the surface of the water,” Krepinevich told me. “In a mature [precision strike] regime, the oceans may shrink to Mediterranean size.”

http://breakingdefense.com/2015/04/no-mans-sea-csbas-lethal-vision-of-future-naval-war/
 

bobbymike

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Link to the study for download:

http://csbaonline.org/publications/2015/04/maritime-competition-in-a-mature-precision-strike-regime/
 

Bruno Anthony

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I guess Krepinevich did not read the USNWCR article written from the Soviet perspective that the Tomcats should get more respect.
https://www.usnwc.edu/getattachment/b2ec1735-8652-40b0-ae04-a9e30a5597cd/Kamikazes--The-Soviet-Legacy.aspx
He cites a lot of NWCR articles but I guess he missed that one
Perhaps didn't fit the new dream of long range drones. Mankind slowly but surely making itself irrelevant.
 

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