Covid-19 Vaccine - Where, How & Costs

shedofdread

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Flyaway

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The reason we have case numbers in the U.K. is down to one simple thing the removal of the requirement for mandatory mask wearing indoors.
 

edwest2

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That doesn't follow. Indoor settings are the most likely to spread aerosols. Both NI and Scotland are keeping face coverings for indoor settings.
 

starviking

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That doesn't follow. Indoor settings are the most likely to spread aerosols. Both NI and Scotland are keeping face coverings for indoor settings.
Boris announced the lifting of restrictions in England as “Freedom Day”, I guess that led many to think “freedom from masks”.
 

Archibald

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That doesn't follow. Indoor settings are the most likely to spread aerosols. Both NI and Scotland are keeping face coverings for indoor settings.
Boris announced the lifting of restrictions in England as “Freedom Day”, I guess that led many to think “freedom from masks”.

Demagogy cranked well past 11, I would say.
 

edwest2

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Too many people in the U.S. have decided that they'll do what they want, even if it leads to death. Just because there are no German planes flying overhead, they have also decided they'll go where they want when they want. And they can. 100% of the time. They can also cross a nearby freeway whenever they want and not look both ways. These people are risking their lives, the lives of people they know and those they don't know.

To them, the remarkable and ONGOING efforts to find better treatments does not matter. PEOPLE CAN"T AFFORD TO THINK LIKE THAT.

And for the POLITICALLY OBSESSED -- Boris and Biden won't save you. Your doctor will. The scientific community will. POLITICIANS CAN"T make vaccines or antiviral pills or antibody treatments. Get medical advice only from your doctor or a registered nurse.
 

DWG

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It seems the U.K. is a particular hotbed of Delta sub variants the virus really seems to be finding itself on effective evolutionary ground over here.

Do bare in mind we also do a great deal of sequencing... It's not beyond the realms of possibility that such mutation is everywhere but goes undetected.

I haven't checked the recent figures, but certainly through into the summer we were doing as much sequencing as the rest of the world combined
 

DWG

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TLDR: back-calculating from overall mortality figures suggests everyone in Iran has had Covid at least once, and in some provinces 2 or 3 times. Which implies it may be impossible to reach herd immunity via infections alone.
 

Archibald

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TLDR: back-calculating from overall mortality figures suggests everyone in Iran has had Covid at least once, and in some provinces 2 or 3 times. Which implies it may be impossible to reach herd immunity via infections alone.

In this case, I really feel sorry for the unfortunate COVID that infected Ali Khamenei. Needless to say, and to spoof Voltaire "it was the virus that dropped dead" (also applies to Jean Marie Le Pen, Bolsonaro, Trump... unfortunately.)

And we all should have a thought for the virus that attacked Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Or tried to do so: the virus actually looked at the guy, sighed, and committed suicide instead: self-imolating. "Way too rotten inside, even for a COVID" were the virus last words.
 

Flyaway

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It’s looking increasingly likely that it’s a virus that has a tendency evolutionarily for transmission over things like immunity escape. From what I’ve read viruses usually go one of two ways so hopefully it will continue to conform to these evolutionary norms.
 

Dreamfighter

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TLDR: back-calculating from overall mortality figures suggests everyone in Iran has had Covid at least once, and in some provinces 2 or 3 times. Which implies it may be impossible to reach herd immunity via infections alone.

I can´t access the article (registration only) - and I know Iranian official numbers (about 6 million infections and about 125.000 dead) are not trustworthy or accurate - but I find it incredible every Iranian (there are about 85 million of them) would have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 (which is not the same as getting/having COVID-19, as some reporters still get mixed up in their writings all too often) at least once, and a large portion of them 2 or even 3 times. Maybe they´re calculating back with a way too low IFR (Infection Fatality Ratio) ??
The median age in Iran is about 32 years, which is 10 years lower then in most European countries but still a bit higher then in India and much higher then in large parts of Africa, and probably not all too many elderly Iranians live in nursing-homes. So, you can expect the casualty-ratio in Iran to be a fair bit lower then in Western countries for a particular number of infections, but in a scenario with between 85 million and maybe 150 million infections there would still be an enormous amount of dead.
 

Dreamfighter

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The majority of cases of Covid have been caused by spending a long time (several hours) in close contact with another person.
This is why the following have been such dangerous places:
Hospitals and Care Homes where people spend lengthy periods up close with strangers.
Families living in cramped housing where they are in close contact with one another and the outside world.
It is no accident that the great proportion of deaths have been among the over 70s. These people are constantly exposed to close contact over time with others.
I have so far avoided Covid by following these rules
Distance NEVER get close or touch strangers. A metre at least when chatting.
Duration After ten or fifteen minutes move away or outside if you can.
Dose If exposed to close contact over time such as public transport wear a mask, washand sterlize and use any shield (face away from people)
The three Ds have so far kept me safe.

A lot of infections indoors are caused by aerosols in the air (invisible clouds made up of very small droplets with virus-nuclei in them) caused by contagious people who cough or sneeze, or who just exhale. So good ventilation, to prevent formation of these aerosols (which can stay in the air sometimes for hours without adequate ventilation) or to get rid off them, is an important part of preventing SARS-CoV-2 infections (and e.g. also common cold and flu infections) indoors.
(CO2-meters are very useful to check if a room is ventilated enough. The CO2-level should be and remain below 900ppm. If it does not, open up a window to let in fresh air.)
 
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sublight is back

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The majority of cases of Covid have been caused by spending a long time (several hours) in close contact with another person.
This is why the following have been such dangerous places:
Hospitals and Care Homes where people spend lengthy periods up close with strangers.
Families living in cramped housing where they are in close contact with one another and the outside world.
It is no accident that the great proportion of deaths have been among the over 70s. These people are constantly exposed to close contact over time with others.
I have so far avoided Covid by following these rules
Distance NEVER get close or touch strangers. A metre at least when chatting.
Duration After ten or fifteen minutes move away or outside if you can.
Dose If exposed to close contact over time such as public transport wear a mask, washand sterlize and use any shield (face away from people)
The three Ds have so far kept me safe.

A lot of infections indoors are caused by aerosols in the air (invisible clouds made up of very small droplets with virus-nuclei in them) caused by contagious people who cough or sneeze, or who just exhale. So good ventilation, to prevent formation of these aerosols (which can stay in the air sometimes for hours without adequate ventilation) or to get rid off them, is an important part of preventing SARS-CoV-2 infections (and e.g. also common cold and flu infections) indoors.
(CO2-meters are very useful to check if a room is ventilated enough. The CO2-level should be and remain below 900ppm. If it does not, open up a window to let in fresh air.)
Or just run a sharp plasmacluster which will kill airborne coronavirus droplets.

 

overscan (PaulMM)

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I have encountered a number of intelligent people who are convinced they need to personally review all the evidence themselves to make a decision.

Personally, I find that a very arrogant response. Sorry, infectious disease and vaccine researchers, immune system scientists - what this topic requires is a detailed examination of the evidence by a computer specialist. Right.
 

Arjen

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In the words of Forrest Gump: stupid is as stupid does.
 

edwest2

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I have encountered a number of intelligent people who are convinced they need to personally review all the evidence themselves to make a decision.

Personally, I find that a very arrogant response. Sorry, infectious disease and vaccine researchers, immune system scientists - what this topic requires is a detailed examination of the evidence by a computer specialist. Right.

Sometimes, intelligent people can be led astray. The most direct route to good information is your doctor. The internet can rapidly spread inaccurate information and raise doubts. For example, I know an intelligent person who believes the vaccines were rushed into production too fast. Compared to what? Previous vaccines involved smaller groups of test subjects. After millions of doses given, the possible side effects have shown themselves. Is that too little information? As of today, according to the business site Bloomberg, 6.9 billion shots have been given.

It may be that this is a trust issue regarding scientists or politicians or both. This is a health matter that could lead to death. And although there are a few treatment options now, including antibody treatments, taking a risk like this is not prudent.
 

edwest2

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"underestimated"? How? "Does anyone know how many people we have?" Unknown person responded: "I think it's about this many." and no one bothered to check?
 

Flyaway

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A panel of independent medical experts advising the Food and Drug Administration voted 17 to 0 (with one abstention) this afternoon in favor of authorizing the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for use in children ages 5 to 11 years old.

The vote is a key step toward the first pediatric COVID-19 vaccine in the US. Next, the FDA will need to sign off on the recommendation from the advisory panel—the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC)—and issue an emergency use authorization for the 5-to-11 age group. That FDA authorization is expected within days. Once that occurs, the federal government will begin shipping pediatric doses of the vaccine to states for distribution at clinics, pharmacies, and pediatricians' offices.
But before doses can go into any little arms, a panel of independent experts for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will also need to weigh in. That panel—the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)—is scheduled to meet November 2 and 3. If ACIP votes in favor of recommending use of the vaccine in children ages 5 to 11, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky will need to sign off on the committee's recommendation. That would likely happen quickly, and after that, vaccinations can begin.
The committee also heard detailed data on the risk of myocarditis, which is most significant in young males. But the data we have so far suggests the risk may peak in males ages 16 to 17, similar to what's seen in "classic" myocarditis cases from the prepandemic era. For instance, according to the latest data, there were around 70 cases of myocarditis for every 1 million doses of vaccine given to males ages 16 to 17. But the rates dropped to about 40 cases per 1 million doses in males 12 to 15 and 37 cases per 1 million doses in males 18 to 24.

This mirrors what's been seen before with myocarditis. Case rates overall are higher in males, and the risk is bimodal with age. Infants less than 1 year old and teens 16 to 18 have the highest rates of hospitalization for myocarditis. Between infancy and adolescence, the risk is low, and it declines gradually after the adolescent peak. Why this trend exists is unclear, but medical experts suspect that the infant peak in myocarditis is linked to congenital problems and the adolescent peak is related to testosterone levels—which also helps explain why it's mainly seen in males.
With all of the uncertainty and complicated modeling data, there was clear hesitation and a lack of enthusiasm for authorizing the vaccine for all children among some of the VRBPAC members. Some advocated for authorizing the vaccine just for children at high risk of severe disease, such as those with asthma or obesity. "It just seems to me that in some ways we're vaccinating children to protect the adults, when it should be the other way around," said James Hildreth, voting VRBPAC member and president of Meharry Medical College. "So, this is a really tough one for me, but I do believe that children at highest risk do need to be vaccinated."

Others openly worried that the authorization would lead to vaccine mandates for all children before more safety data could accumulate to better assess the risk/benefit calculations. "I think [mandates] would be an error at this time until we get more information about the safety," said Cody Meissner, voting VRBPAC member and pediatric infectious disease expert at Tufts Medical Center.
 

starviking

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"underestimated"? How? "Does anyone know how many people we have?" Unknown person responded: "I think it's about this many." and no one bothered to check?
There could be a wastage calculation to figure out for the roll-out, or uncertainty as to exactly how many vunerable people need to get a booster.
 

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