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Aircraft designs inspired by the British Civil Air Guard

cluttonfred

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On 23 July 1938, Britain launched the Civil Air Guard, a scheme to subsidize students in private flying clubs in return for their commitment to be called up for national service in wartime. By 8 October 1938, over 30,000 applications had been received and there was a shortage of suitable light aircraft and instructors to meet the demand. The fun didn't last long, as civil flying was prohibited as war approached and Britain entered the war on 3 September 1939.

In "The Aeroplane That Flies Itself," a recent article in The Aviation Historian (Issue no. 8, July 15, 2014), Richard Riding recounted the history of Chrislea Aircraft, starting with the Chrislea LC.1 Airguard designed specifically to provide a light aircraft for the CAG. It was not a success and only one was built (photo attached).

In the same article, Richard Riding says this about the high-wing Chrislea C.H.3 Series 1 Ace. "At first glance, the Ace bore an uncanny resemblance to the pre-war, two-seat Peterborough Guardian. Intended as a contender for the CAG market, the Guardian was equipped with a tricycle undercarriage and powered by a 90 h.p. Blackburn Cirrus. Allotted the registration G-AFZT, it was nearing completion when war put a halt to the project."

Can anyone provide any more information about the mysterious Peterborough Guardian? How about any other designs inspired by the short-lived Civil Air Guard?

Cheers,

Matthew
 

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Apophenia

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Matthew: There's a feature article on the Peterborough Guardian in Flight, 25 Dec 1941, which includes photos of G1 without its fabric covering, some detail drawings, and the attached 3-view drawing (which I've cleaned up a little).

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1941/1941%20-%203091.html
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1941/1941%20-%203092.html

Air History has the following: Peterborough Guardian, c/n G1, G-AFZT, Peterborough Aircraft Co Ltd/Horsey Toll, 12.10.39, Not completed
http://www.airhistory.org.uk/gy/reg_G-A11.html
 

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Apophenia

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A 15 Sept 1938 Flight feature article on the 'Chrislea Monoplane':
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1938/1938%20-%202597.html

The Feb 1893 Aeroplane Monthly article by Lettice Curtis lists the types used by the CAG. These include: the Avro Cadet (number not listed), B.A. Swallow (x 40+), Chrislea L.C.1. Airguard (x 1), Cierva C.30 (x 6), Currie Wot 2 (x 1), De Havilland D.H.87 Hornet Moth ('popular') and D.H.94 Moth Minor (x 2), Foster Wikner Wicko (x ?), Hillson Praga (x ?), and Spartan Arrow (x 8).

Imported types include the Aeronca C-3, Piper Cub Coupé, and Taylorcraft Plus C.
http://aviadejavu.ru/Site/Arts/Art7437.htm

Richard Riding confirms in A Flying Life that the Pragas belonged to the Northern Aviation School and Club Ltd, Barton, but were "flown often by Civil Air Guard students".
 

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cluttonfred

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Thanks very much, Apophenia, I did actually spend some time looking for the Guardian inmth FLIGHT archives but only up to 1939 or 1940, figuring that there wouldn't be much light plane coverage during the war years. Clearly, I figured wrong.

While seemingly a little narrow for a side-by-side two-seater, the Guardian does have a remarkable modern look about it for the time. Great stuff, thanks.
 

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