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3-jet light twin-fuselage bomber design by Ernie Heim

cluttonfred

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It certainly seems to show some influence from wartime German designs like the Heinkel and even French designs like those of Fauvel, but from the caption it appears to be an original sketch by a reader from Michigan.
 

Orionblamblam

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From the '30's into the '50's, when seemingly hundreds of new aircraft models were produced every year, the aviation/science/mechanics magazines would regularly publish aircraft designs submitted by random schmoes. The designs tended to "look good" because the magazines would use staff artists to redraw the submissions to the same standard of artistic quality... but they were still just sketches from, in effect, nobodies.
 

Just call me Ray

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Orionblamblam said:
From the '30's into the '50's, when seemingly hundreds of new aircraft models were produced every year, the aviation/science/mechanics magazines would regularly publish aircraft designs submitted by random schmoes. The designs tended to "look good" because the magazines would use staff artists to redraw the submissions to the same standard of artistic quality... but they were still just sketches from, in effect, nobodies.
Harsh, but so very, very true.
 

archipeppe

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Indeed it seems to be more an English design rather a German one....
For example the left cockpit, for the pilot, it comes straight from a De Havilland DH 100 Vampire.
 

hole in the ground

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my money would be on a Boulton Paul design, if it proves to be of British origin. Twin fuse P.111?
 

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"..even French designs like those of Fauvel.."

Well, looks like an updated version of the Fauvel AV 28 (drawing from
http://www.nurflugel.com/Nurflugel/Fauvel/AV28.htm ),
but I must agree with Scott, many of those artist impressions have
to be regarded just as "art" ... :-\
 

lark

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Indeed , in those years-early fifties- Air Trails (U.S.magazine) got a montly
colum under the title 'Airman of Vision' Design competition
in wich wouldbe designers could put their idea's.
The winner of the month received an award of 25$...
 

Justo Miranda

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archipeppe said:
Indeed it seems to be more an English design rather a German one....
For example the left cockpit, for the pilot, it comes straight from a De Havilland DH 100 Vampire.
Or twin 707 inspiration ...
 

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Jemiba

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... or the FFA N-20, as posted by Justo, see here :
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,5188.0/highlight,ffa+n-20.html

Nowadays we would call it "kitbashing", the left fuselage of one of the mentioned types,
scale 1/72, the center wing with the intake maybe the wing with radiator of a Mossie
in 1/48, or 1/32 and the right fuselage just agun pod in a larger scale. Or is there a
bomb aimer house in prone position ?
 

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I have drawn a concept of an alternative MiG MFI design from my own head. I know very little about aircraft design, and the chances of my design being useful are pretty low. However the drawing has taken on a life of its own and appears a lot around the internet. I would suggest that the interest value of my drawing is (or should be) fairly low.

In contrast, I would suggest that the MiG-2000 concept by General Dynamics is quite interesting, despite being just as fictional, because it was created by real aircraft designers in a serious attempt to imagine what the next MiG might look like.
 

Jemiba

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I once found my drawing of the "Breguet Br.780" on http://www.calf.cn/viewthread.php?tid=8721&extra=page%3D6&page=1, a chinese site with hundreds of 3-views (probably all without permission
or credits !)
But the Br.780 was purely a joke, a Br.764 modified into a heavy bomber by squeezing the fuselage
into slimmer shape and adding 2 engines.

For someone, not really able to read english,even this forum has some traps, that can lead him to
accept as real, what just was intended as a joke. And one day, you can buy the first kit of it! :D
 

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Orionblamblam

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TsrJoe said:
iv found over the years that theres quite a lot of what cound be termed such which upon further research turn out to be from persons working within industry, pet projects or indeed designers using a differing forum to suggest 'fun' concepts which may be seen as dead end within industry
With *rare* exceptions, even good designers are "nobody" if their designs are done in a setting where they will never get built. Take me, for example: I am a passably good rocket system design engineer. I've designed everything from small biprop engines to launch vehicles. The designs I created for various companies? Meaningful. Stood a chance to get built (and some did). Apprpriate for this forum. The designs I created as a lark while at home? Generally meaningless.

Context is terribly important.
 

Justo Miranda

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It is a law of life that good ideas are originated by young people and put into practice by older ones, well integrated in the establishment.
I believe that the vitality of an industry can be gauged by the time it takes to copy an original idea, isolated from its original source, and put it into practice.
If you allow me the irony, it is very similar to a money laundering process.
 

aim9xray

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Orionblamblam said:
Context is terribly important.
And context can be *excruciatingly* difficult to devine from a drawing, particularly as viewed from this end of the wayback machine.
 

Justo Miranda

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An example of "context" is the hurry with which Sydney Camm had to design the wing of the Hawker Typhoon.
It was a bad design that was paid with the life of 28 pilots.
 

Orionblamblam

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aim9xray said:
Orionblamblam said:
Context is terribly important.
And context can be *excruciatingly* difficult to devine from a drawing, particularly as viewed from this end of the wayback machine.
Sure. But from this far removed, a few details can pop out about some particular "magazine design:"
1) "Designed by who? Never heard of him."
2) "Looks unlikely."
3) "Nothing like that ever got built."
4) "No manufacturer seems to have expressed an interest."

Put those together...
 

aim9xray

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Oh, I agree for the "reader submission" in a magazine.

My comment was meant more in the context of evaluating the umpteenth variation drawing (or piece of art) of, say, a Boeing xxx-yyy number, without knowing if it was for a NASA study, AFRL, IRAD, or even the art department.

By the way, three of your criteria are met by Armand Thieblot.
 

Orionblamblam

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aim9xray said:
Oh, I agree for the "reader submission" in a magazine.

My comment was meant more in the context of evaluating the umpteenth variation drawing (or piece of art) of, say, a Boeing xxx-yyy number, without knowing if it was for a NASA study, AFRL, IRAD, or even the art department.
Yes, but let's face it... 4) "No manufacturer seems to have expressed an interest" is the real test. No matter how nutty, impossible, ill-conceived or even just plain stupid a design might be, if it was done by Boeing employees on Boeing time, it's suddenly interesting.
 

Jemiba

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"if it was done by Boeing employees on Boeing time, it's suddenly interesting."

Right, because, I think, if Boeing tasks a designer and pays him for his work, Boeing will
have some kind of interest in the result.

If you replace "Boeing" by "Junkers" or "Focke-Wulf" (or maybe even "Sukhoi" or "Mikoyan" ?),
I think, matters may be sometimes a little bit different. During times, when the aim was just
to keep the design team complete and intact (alive !), there may have been designs by a
real Junkers designer, using Junkers paper and with Junkers pencils for drawing a design ... his
company never had the slightest ambition to even consider it !

But generally "No manufacturer seems to have expressed an interest" should be a good point,
I think. Amateurs mostly aren't just the inventor or designer, but double as "manufacturer ",
so they are "in",exceptions from that rule perhaps could be design Bureaus/thinktanks like
Bauhaus Luftfahrt e.v. (http://www.bauhaus-luftfahrt.net/) or even Avpro ?
But probably not Monsieur Luigi Colani ! ;D
 

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Mole said:
It certainly seems to show some influence from wartime German designs like the Heinkel and even French designs like those of Fauvel, but from the caption it appears to be an original sketch by a reader from Michigan.
Indeed, each month (dating from the very late 1940s or very early 1950s, Air Trails magazine had a contest whereby readers were invited to submit designs for cash prizes. Three were chosen each month. This appears to be one of those designs.
 

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Finally I found it,

but I can't translate well.

http://www.avia-it.com/act/biblioteca/periodici/PDF%20Riviste/Ali%20nuove/1954/Ali%20nuove%201954%2006.pdf
 

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archipeppe

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The caption tells that such design belongs to an amateur named "Raffaele Sgarzi" by Milan.
Probably he was inspired (or copied it well) by the Ernie Heim design, it not solves the puzzle.
 
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