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Author Topic: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans  (Read 56356 times)

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2011, 07:27:18 pm »
Russia to Purchase 36 ICBMs in 2011
Monday, March 21, 2011

Russia intends to purchase 36 ICBMs and a pair of ballistic-missile submarines in 2011, Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov said on Friday (see GSN, March 18).

The procurements would be funded under Russia's decade-long military modernization plan, RIA Novosti quoted Serdyukov as saying at a meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and senior military officials. The plan's projected cost exceeds $670 billion, he said; the program's anticipated expense was previously reported to be $650 billion (RIA Novosti I, March 18).

Meanwhile, a high-level Russian navy insider said a future ballistic-missile submarine would also carry cruise missiles. Moscow in February indicated it would prepare the fifth-generation ballistic missile submarine by 2020 as part of its military modernization effort.

Russia also intends to construct by 2020 eight earlier-generation ballistic-missile submarines it would arm with the new Bulava ballistic missile. The Bulava missile is slated to be placed on active duty in 2011 (RIA Novosti II, March 19).
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Putin Announces Doubling of Missile Production
By NABI ABDULLAEV
Published: 21 Mar 2011 15:22

MOSCOW - Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said March 21 that Russia will double production of missile systems beginning in 2013 as the government plans to spend $2.7 billion to launch their serial production until 2020. "New missile weapons, strategic and tactical, such as Yars, Bulava and Iskander-M, will enter service, and beginning in 2013 the production output of missile systems should effectively double," Putin said. Speaking in Votkinsk at a government meeting dedicated to the $670 billion 2011-2020 state arms procurement program, Putin added that the local Votkinsk plant will get $340 million for its modernization within the next three years. Other companies involved in the same production chain with the Votkinsk plant will get $190 million to upgrade their equipment in the next three years, the prime minister said.

The Votkinsk plant, launched in the Volga region Udmurtia republic in 1984, produces the Topol-M, Yars and Bulava intercontinental ballistic missiles, which are expected to remain the core of Russia's strategic nuclear forces for decades ahead. Putin, who visited the plant March 21, called it "the most key one in the whole industry," adding that it will enjoy guaranteed state defense orders. Under the New START nuclear arms reduction treaty between Russia and the United States, which went into effect in February, both countries should have up to 1,550 nuclear warheads and 700 deployed launchers. According to the official disclosure, Russia now has more than 4,000 nuclear warheads and over 800 deployed launchers.
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4000 deployed warheads and increasing missile production, new ICBMs, new Marv, active warhead production lines. Did we just sign a new arms control treaty or is Brezhnev back in office?
« Last Edit: March 21, 2011, 07:36:10 pm by bobbymike »
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Offline Mercurius Cantabrigiensis

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2011, 07:45:37 am »
rather than service life extension (US MMIII - how is that NOT a new missile, to all intents and purposes?).

Saying that the MMIIIs are new is like saying the B-52s are new simply because they've been updated.  The last MMIII rolled off the assembly line nearly 35 years ago.  How many Russian ICBMs are 35 years old?


They are new to the degree that most of the guidance system has been replaced with modern electronics, and the rocket motors have been remanufactured with new propellant charges.  And there  have been other programmes in which new technology has replacing earlier Minuteman hardware. The RVs and warheads came from the scrapped Peacekeeper force, so are not the originals.

Offline sferrin

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2011, 08:28:18 am »
rather than service life extension (US MMIII - how is that NOT a new missile, to all intents and purposes?).

Saying that the MMIIIs are new is like saying the B-52s are new simply because they've been updated.  The last MMIII rolled off the assembly line nearly 35 years ago.  How many Russian ICBMs are 35 years old?


They are new to the degree that most of the guidance system has been replaced with modern electronics, and the rocket motors have been remanufactured with new propellant charges.  And there  have been other programmes in which new technology has replacing earlier Minuteman hardware. The RVs and warheads came from the scrapped Peacekeeper force, so are not the originals.

IIRC wasn't the regraining of the motors a step backwards?  I seem to remember reading that due to formulation changes for environmental concerns that it lost ISP and thus range.
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Offline xmotex

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2011, 12:19:09 pm »
Heaven forfend our nuclear missiles not be environmentally friendly  :o

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2011, 01:37:44 pm »
rather than service life extension (US MMIII - how is that NOT a new missile, to all intents and purposes?).

Saying that the MMIIIs are new is like saying the B-52s are new simply because they've been updated.  The last MMIII rolled off the assembly line nearly 35 years ago.  How many Russian ICBMs are 35 years old?


They are new to the degree that most of the guidance system has been replaced with modern electronics, and the rocket motors have been remanufactured with new propellant charges.  And there  have been other programmes in which new technology has replacing earlier Minuteman hardware. The RVs and warheads came from the scrapped Peacekeeper force, so are not the originals.

IIRC wasn't the regraining of the motors a step backwards?  I seem to remember reading that due to formulation changes for environmental concerns that it lost ISP and thus range.

sferrin - that's why we need a new ultra modern MMIII replacement. Under the IHPRPT program new solid rocket formulations of high ISP have been tested. Plus in my mind we really need to exercise our ICBM industrial base right from research through to production. It would include the best technology in every aspect of the missile. I would start that today so that you had a lot of time to ensure the new technology works prior to "having" to replace MMIII.

I think Aerojet or ATK tested a 72" diameter first stage for "future strategic strike applications" (MMIII is 66" I believe) with IHPRPT systems. I would look to double MMIII throw weight allowing uploading of up to five or six warheads of 475 kt W87's in case the current "path to zero" is thrown off track.
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Offline RLBH

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2011, 05:59:06 am »
I would look to double MMIII throw weight allowing uploading of up to five or six warheads of 475 kt W87's in case the current "path to zero" is thrown off track.
The other consideration that makes a high throw weight missile attractive is that, offloaded, it has high delta-V, allowing a wider range of trajectories for the same target set. This can be attractive for reasons of overflight rights - if the US had cause to conduct a limited strike against targets in (say) Iran or North Korea, the Russians would almost certainly object to taking the direct route over their country. If you can put a higher-performance (but heavier) bus on the missile, crossrange might be increased to the point where overflights aren't necessary for some targets.

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2011, 06:14:08 am »
I would look to double MMIII throw weight allowing uploading of up to five or six warheads of 475 kt W87's in case the current "path to zero" is thrown off track.
The other consideration that makes a high throw weight missile attractive is that, offloaded, it has high delta-V, allowing a wider range of trajectories for the same target set. This can be attractive for reasons of overflight rights - if the US had cause to conduct a limited strike against targets in (say) Iran or North Korea, the Russians would almost certainly object to taking the direct route over their country. If you can put a higher-performance (but heavier) bus on the missile, crossrange might be increased to the point where overflights aren't necessary for some targets.

It is interesting you say that because options for a MMIII replacement in the 2004 ICBM replacement AoA the Air Force did was for ranges up to 26,000 km and that this same missile could be used for conventional prompt global strike. The long range was for that very reason. Also as to not overfly Russia or other sensitive countries a South Pole launch was even contemplated to hit targets in places like Iran. A southern launch would definitely have a different trajectory than a normal nuke launch.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2011, 11:55:04 am »
Russia to Boost Ballistic Missile Manufacturing, Putin Says
Thursday, April 21, 2011

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Wednesday asserted that beginning in 2013 the nation would double the number of ballistic missiles it manufactures, RIA Novosti reported (see GSN, April 12). "The armed forces will receive new strategic and tactical missile systems, such as RS-24 Yars, Bulava and Iskander M," Putin said in his yearly speech to Russian lawmakers. In March, Putin said Moscow would spend $2.6 billion on the manufacturing of ballistic missiles in accordance with an armed forces update plan. Missile producers, including a factory in Votkinsk, in the coming three years are to receive $500 million to bolster their manufacturing capabilities, Putin said. "The financing will gradually increase in the future," he said (RIA Novosti, April 20).
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2011, 07:06:12 pm »
Russia to Field Missile Defense-Evading ICBM by 2018
Thursday, May 5, 2011

Russia intends no later than 2018 to field an all-new ICBM with the capacity to evade missile defenses, including systems based in outer space, the Xinhua News Agency reported on Thursday (see GSN, March 18). The long-range heavy ballistic missile would be an entirely new weapon and not a copy of the existing Voevoda system, one-time Russian nuclear missile chief Viktor Yesin said. The planned fifth-generation ICBM would be designed to defeat missile defenses, while its launch facilities are also to be shielded with protective antimissile systems, Yesin said. The ICBM could be fired "within seconds" of a launch order, he added. The new ICBM, combined with the current Yars and Topol-M missiles, would establish for Russia a first-strike capability with the ability to eliminate threats posed by an opponent's antimissile systems, Yesin said.
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So this is what the "reset" button with Russia gets us? We neglect our Triad and nuclear weapons enterprise and Russia develops a first strike [their words] "heavy" ICBM?
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline sferrin

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2011, 08:19:57 pm »
I thought the magic TOPOL was suppose to make missile defenses obsolete.  Funny thing is US ICBMs have always been able to fire "within seconds" of launch order.  ISTR reading even back in the 80s that the Minutman fleets reaction time was under 30 seconds.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2011, 08:21:30 pm by sferrin »
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Offline stew3

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2011, 04:24:31 am »
Haven't the Russians always made pretty bold claims though?  I think it stems from their historic inferiority complex and feeling of having to catch up with the west.  Not that what they make is junk, although sometimes that is the case as well.

Offline stew3

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2011, 04:39:54 am »
Russia to Boost Ballistic Missile Manufacturing, Putin Says
Thursday, April 21, 2011

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Wednesday asserted that beginning in 2013 the nation would double the number of ballistic missiles it manufactures, RIA Novosti reported (see GSN, April 12). "The armed forces will receive new strategic and tactical missile systems, such as RS-24 Yars, Bulava and Iskander M," Putin said in his yearly speech to Russian lawmakers. In March, Putin said Moscow would spend $2.6 billion on the manufacturing of ballistic missiles in accordance with an armed forces update plan. Missile producers, including a factory in Votkinsk, in the coming three years are to receive $500 million to bolster their manufacturing capabilities, Putin said. "The financing will gradually increase in the future," he said (RIA Novosti, April 20).


How does this compare with Obama's promise (we will see) to spend several billion on updating our nuclear weapons complex?  I know we are not producing MM3 rocket moters (I think) and the Russians are.  Although we do have some recent experience producing Trident 2 missiles, the Russians seem to have a much more active iCBM industrial production base.  And  how many MM missiles do we have left?  (other than the 450, soon to be 420 in the silos)  We seem to be test firing them a lot.

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2011, 06:35:10 am »
Russia to Boost Ballistic Missile Manufacturing, Putin Says
Thursday, April 21, 2011

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Wednesday asserted that beginning in 2013 the nation would double the number of ballistic missiles it manufactures, RIA Novosti reported (see GSN, April 12). "The armed forces will receive new strategic and tactical missile systems, such as RS-24 Yars, Bulava and Iskander M," Putin said in his yearly speech to Russian lawmakers. In March, Putin said Moscow would spend $2.6 billion on the manufacturing of ballistic missiles in accordance with an armed forces update plan. Missile producers, including a factory in Votkinsk, in the coming three years are to receive $500 million to bolster their manufacturing capabilities, Putin said. "The financing will gradually increase in the future," he said (RIA Novosti, April 20).


How does this compare with Obama's promise (we will see) to spend several billion on updating our nuclear weapons complex?  I know we are not producing MM3 rocket moters (I think) and the Russians are.  Although we do have some recent experience producing Trident 2 missiles, the Russians seem to have a much more active iCBM industrial production base.  And  how many MM missiles do we have left?  (other than the 450, soon to be 420 in the silos)  We seem to be test firing them a lot.

Money for the weapons complex is strictly for nuclear weapons, warhead refurbishment, RV's, etc nothing for delivery systems. Russia has a far more robust modernization program for delivery systems. The US "forgot" to include $6 million this year for a MMIII replacement study so I don't know how serious they are towards Triad modernization. There is also preliminary work on a Trident replacement the SSBN(X) and missile but we won't see the former until 2030 and the later to 2037 I believe. A MMIII replacement is scheduled for 2030 as well but with 20 years of projected large federal deficits between now and then we will wait to see if anything get built.

Check out the Future US ICBM's and SLBM's thread great information there. http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,6632.0.html
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #28 on: May 25, 2011, 03:21:08 pm »
Russian Missile Test Said to Involve New Weapon
Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Russia's submarine-launched missile test on Friday did not involve a Sineva system as was officially stated but rather a new "Liner" ICBM, Russia Today reported (see GSN, May 23). The Russian Miass Missile Center on Tuesday revealed that the successful test actually involved a new ICBM variant that had been developed in secret. The missile could be a significantly advanced version of the Sineva, which entered into service four years ago, Russia Today reported (Russia Today, May 25). Meanwhile, the first of Russia's fourth-generation Borei-class submarines has been put into water for final sea testing, Sevmash shipyard spokeswoman Anastasia Nikitinskaya said to ITAR-Tass (see GSN, April 20).

Work on the nuclear-powered Yuri Dolgoruky began in 1996. Shipyard testing of the vessel began in 2007 and ended in 2010. The submarine is to field the experimental Bulava missile, with an initial test launch from the vessel slated to take place in 2011. Russia intends to construct a minimum of eight Borei-class submarines, which would form the backbone of the country's revamped sea-based nuclear deterrent (ITAR-Tass, May 24). Separately, Russian RS-24 ICBMs are to be fielded this year with a unit at a military installation in the Ivanovo region, Interfax reported on Tuesday (see GSN, May 18). "The rearmament of the RS-24 ICBM fitted with a MIRV (multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicle) warhead boosts the [Russian strategic missile troops] attack force's combat capability to counter missile defense systems, thus strengthening the nuclear deterrent potential of the Russian strategic nuclear forces," RSVN spokesman Col. Vadim Koval said (Interfax, May 24)
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline Trident

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Re: Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans
« Reply #29 on: May 26, 2011, 12:49:00 am »
Liner is probably little more than a Sineva with a different warhead configuration (ISTR Sineva carries four, maybe the new one has more of a smaller design? The basic missile definitely has the throw weight to handle a lot more than just 4!). Would also explain how it could be developed so quickly, much like the RS-24 is basically a MIRVed Topol-M.