Register here

Author Topic: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program  (Read 64374 times)

Offline bobbymike

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 8346
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #285 on: June 06, 2018, 06:07:44 am »
https://insidedefense.com/insider/esper-long-range-precision-fires-will-serve-joint-purpose

Quote
ong-range precision fires are the Army's No. 1 modernization priority not only because they will provide a critical capability but also because they can be used to benefit the joint force, according to service Secretary Mark Esper.

"We think that for a number of reasons, we need to make sure we have overmatch in indirect fires, not least for a ground campaign, but also we need to have the ability to support our sister services," Esper said during a June 5 talk at the Brookings Institution.

Relating to Multi-Domain Operations, LRPF could be used to help the other services gain entry to a certain theater in a future fight. For instance, the Army could support the Air Force by suppressing enemy air defenses, or the Navy by shooting "multihundred-mile range" rockets or artillery from a coastline, he said.

The Army intends to spend nearly $1.6 billion from fiscal year 2020 to FY-24 in support of LRPF efforts, according to a comprehensive modernization strategy submitted to Congress and obtained last month by Inside Defense.

https://missilethreat.csis.org/the-forthcoming-missile-defense-review/

Quote
Later this spring, the Trump administration will release its 2018 Missile Defense Review (MDR), which is expected to better align U.S. missile defense policy with the present security environment. President Barack Obama’s 2010 Ballistic Missile Defense Review (BMDR) reflected the security environment of the time and the aspirations of the Obama administration. In particular, technological advances by U.S. adversaries and a renewed focus on long-term competition with Russia and China drive the need for a new review.
New Era, New Policy

The new MDR will need to address at least two major trends that have emerged over the past several years: the significant advances made by U.S. adversaries in nuclear and missile technology, and the shift to a more competitive footing with near-peer states like Russia and China as noted in the Trump administration’s National Defense Strategy.

The qualitative progress that U.S. adversaries have made in missile and nuclear development has been considerable. In just the last two years, North Korea has tested six new ballistic missile variants, including two versions of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of reaching U.S. territory. It has also made unexpected progress toward a solid-fuel submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) and has tested new, more advanced antiship missiles and air defenses.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bring_it_on

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1654
  • I really should change my personal text
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #286 on: June 07, 2018, 07:31:15 am »
...
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bobbymike

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 8346
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #287 on: June 08, 2018, 07:11:34 am »
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/06/sasc-ndaa-would-add-500m-for-cruise-missile-defense/

Quote
An American Achilles’ Heel

While the US military has invested massively in defense against ballistic missiles — such as GBI, THAAD, and Patriot — it’s largely neglected cruise missiles, which fly completely different flight paths and present a different kind of target. ICBMs, Scuds, and similar launch on a plume of hot exhaust visible from space and then fly a completely predictable ballistic path — hence the name — so they’re (relatively) easy to spot. But they fly so fast and high they’re hard to hit, requiring highly specialized high-performance interceptors.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline marauder2048

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 2010
  • "I should really just relax"
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #288 on: June 13, 2018, 09:39:16 am »
LOCKHEED MARTIN'S MINIATURE HIT-TO-KILL INTERCEPTOR MATURES TO DEVELOPMENT STAGE

PARIS, June 13, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Army Cruise Missile Defense Systems Project
Office awarded Lockheed Martin a $2.6 million dollar contract to mature the Miniature Hit-to-Kill
(MHTK) interceptor, evaluate its effectiveness and demonstrate manufacturing readiness as part
of the Extended Mission Area Missile Program. Announced by the company at the Eurosatory
exhibition, this award marks the MHTK's transition from the Science and Technology (S&T) phase to
the Development phase.

"This award brings us one step closer to addressing a top battlefield priority – having an effective
and cost-efficient solution to defeat rockets, artillery, mortars and other airborne targets,"
said Hal Stuart, Force Protection program manager at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control.

Previous S&T contracts with the U.S. Army, together with Lockheed Martin investment, helped
mature the MHTK missile from basic research to a concept demonstration with two configurations
– a semi-active radio frequency seeker and an active radio frequency seeker.  MHTK has
conducted a dozen flight tests with a combination of investment and contract funds.
The most recent controlled flight test in January at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico,
demonstrated the interceptor's increased agility and validated performance of the airframe
and electronics, which are now common between MHTK's two configurations to drive affordability.

The MHTK missile is designed to defeat rocket, artillery and mortar targets through body-to-body
contact without a warhead at ranges projected to exceed those of current and interim systems. The
missile is just under two and a half feet (76 cm) in length, an inch and a half (4 cm) in diameter and
weighs about five pounds (2.2 kg) at launch. The compact size of MHTK allows multiple rounds to
be packaged in a very small footprint to effectively combat complex threat situations like saturation
attacks. The MHTK interceptor complements the Lockheed Martin family of Hit-to-Kill missile
interceptors by delivering close range lethality with proven success for truly layered defense.

https://news.lockheedmartin.com/2018-06-13-Lockheed-Martins-Miniature-Hit-to-Kill-Interceptor-Matures-to-Development-Stage#assets_all

Offline bobbymike

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 8346
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #289 on: June 15, 2018, 12:33:26 am »
https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/eurosatory/2018/06/14/nammo-rolls-out-its-extreme-range-artillery/

Quote

PARIS — Norwegian ammunition company Nammo has rolled out what it’s calling an “extreme range” artillery concept using ramjet propulsion that it hopes will meet the emerging long-range precision fires requirements for a variety of countries, including the United States.

Nammo has combined its experience in both ammunition and rocket-propulsion technology, and it’s merging those capabilities to create an artillery shell capable of reaching more than 100 kilometers in range without changing the gun on a standard 155mm howitzer, according to Thomas Danbolt, company vice president of large caliber ammunition, who spoke at Eurosatory, one of the largest land warfare conferences in Europe.

The company displayed a model of the artillery shell at the exposition.

The development makes sense at a time where countries around the world are seeking farther standoff ranges for their fires capabilities as they contemplate having to penetrate territory that is built up to deny access by land, sea and air.

The U.S. Army, in fact, has made Long-Range Precision Fires its top modernization priority and is pursuing technology to extend cannon artillery. The service is also developing technology to get after extremely long ranges like hypersonics and ramjet technology.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline fredymac

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1162
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #290 on: June 15, 2018, 02:57:15 am »
Looks expensive.  The XM1113 round is being developed internally by the Army so it will be the favored in-house solution.  That's assuming they get the electrical burn process fully worked out.

ERCA and XM1113 article
https://www.themaven.net/warriormaven/land/new-army-artillery-doubles-attack-range-outguns-russian-equivalent-EAew8QuDH0ih_KoSc1Nv9Q/

Offline TomS

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 2640
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #291 on: June 15, 2018, 03:15:37 am »
News reports keep lowballing the Nammo round's range -- 100km is ballistic; with aerodynamic gliding, the company claims 150km.  That's really not in the same ballpark as XM1113; these aren't alternative solutions to the same requirement.




Offline jsport

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 966
  • I really should change my personal text
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #292 on: June 15, 2018, 08:11:58 am »
Now if a Electro Magnetic Thermal Chemical Gun technology were brought back (as it never should have been abandoned) were used to fire this or SCRAM shells (as they never should have been abandoned) then realistic Suppression of Air Defense (SEAD) can be accomplished from ships.

Offline bobbymike

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 8346
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #293 on: June 20, 2018, 04:10:07 pm »


TC-GMLRS conducts successful test flight

"Hit M3.8 at burnout" Very nice now load these on a B-52 or a surface ship by the hundreds.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bobbymike

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 8346
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #294 on: June 22, 2018, 05:18:29 pm »
https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/eurosatory/2018/06/21/one-of-these-3-missiles-could-be-the-armys-next-interceptor-to-protect-against-indirect-fires/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DFN%20DNR%206/21/18&utm_term=Editorial%20-%20Daily%20News%20Roundup

Quote

PARIS — The U.S. Army has awarded three $2.6 million contracts in the first phase of a program to find a second interceptor to defend against rockets, artillery, mortars, cruise missiles and drones.

Lockheed Martin was awarded one contract to mature its Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) missile out of the science and technology phase and into the development phase.

And Raytheon received two awards: one to qualify Sky Hunter — which is the U.S. version of Israeli company Rafael’s Tamir interceptor — and another based on the Accelerated Improved Interceptor Initiative (AI3).

The U.S. Army indicated in its fiscal year 2019 budget documents that it wanted a new surface-to-air missile to provide capability to counter RAM, cruise missile and drone threats and plans to hold a competition to procure it.

The missile the Army is calling the Expanded Mission Area Missile, or EMAM, will be the second interceptor qualified for the Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 program, or IFPC Inc. 2, which has been in development to counter RAM threats for years.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bobbymike

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 8346
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #295 on: June 29, 2018, 05:51:08 am »
https://www.defensenews.com/land/2018/06/28/us-armys-interim-short-range-air-defense-solution-crystallizes/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=Socialflow

Quote

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army’s interim short-range air defense system, which will urgently fill a capability gap identified a few years ago in the European theater, has crystallized.

The Army had already decided the Interim Maneuver-Short-Range Air Defense system would be developed around its Stryker combat vehicle, but it has now chosen Leonardo DRS to supply a mission equipment package that will include Raytheon’s Stinger vehicle missile launcher, according to Col. Chuck Worshim, program manager for cruise missile defense systems with the Army’s Program Executive Office Missiles and Space, who spoke to Defense News on June 28.

General Dynamics Land Systems — which produces the Stryker — will be the platform integrator for the IM-SHORAD system, he added.

The Army went through a selection process through the Department of Defense Ordnance Technology Consortium to determine the best collection of vendors to build prototypes.

A Boeing-GDLS team was a front-runner for an interim SHORAD mission package, unveiling before any other vendor a solution in August 2017 at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline Moose

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 795
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #296 on: June 29, 2018, 09:22:29 am »
Seems like a good choice. Boeing's need to have Avengers supplied from government stocks was a problem, as was their need to more heavily modify the base vehicle. Going to be interesting to see how much the Army is able to take advantage of the mount's flexibility.

Offline sferrin

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 10622
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #297 on: June 29, 2018, 10:01:29 am »
Stinger. Again. Color me neither impressed nor surprised.  ::)  I guess making something actually useful would be too hard.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline Moose

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 795
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #298 on: June 29, 2018, 06:50:16 pm »
It's a rapid-acquisition, interim system and the requirements specified Stinger. Question is what happens with the system going forward, does it receive a laser and//or new missiles down the line? And what will the NGCV version of manuever SHORAD look like?

Offline jsport

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 966
  • I really should change my personal text
Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #299 on: July 02, 2018, 08:44:14 am »
It's a rapid-acquisition, interim system and the requirements specified Stinger. Question is what happens with the system going forward, does it receive a laser and//or new missiles down the line? And what will the NGCV version of manuever SHORAD look like?

An NGCV w/ some version of the 75mm ARES autocannon able to handle everything from drones to ballistics missiles (ballistic msle def 75mm HV gun has been studied) would be start.  :D