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Author Topic: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program  (Read 64390 times)

Offline TomS

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #270 on: April 25, 2018, 10:18:05 am »
Paladin's developments are great for rapid sustained fire technology that Crusader started realizing  but a Strategic Strike Artillery appears needs Light Gas and tanks need an ETC as railguns are still very risky and were judged back in the 80s as impractical for tanks.

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/03/plans-for-new-us-super-tank-with.html

That page has some major misinformation on it.  The statement that the XM360 uses ETC is simply false -- it's just a lightweight 120mm firing the same ammunition as the current 120mm tank guns. 

Offline jsport

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #271 on: April 25, 2018, 02:57:34 pm »
Here is the often read discussion of FCS gun alternatives back in 1997 which could prompt discussion today. Binary liquid propellants that have been patented after 97 render LP much safer and deserve a look.

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/1997/5fcs97.pdf

Offline marauder2048

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #273 on: May 07, 2018, 06:13:25 am »
https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/aaaa/2018/04/30/army-extending-range-of-airborne-munitions/

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Army is working to extend the range of its airborne precision munitions in order to provide greater standoff in future contested environments.

Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said at the Army Aviation Association of America on April 26, that the service needs to make sure it is extending the range of its current capabilities.

The service prioritized long-range precision fires as its top modernization effort, and it is taking steps to extend the range of its cannon artillery on the ground in the short term.

Matching that capability in the sky, the Army aviation’s research, development and engineering arm is looking to increase standoff ranges for its helicopters to effectively fire its munitions.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

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Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #274 on: May 08, 2018, 08:53:46 pm »
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/05/army-needs-2b-a-year-more-for-big-six-52-for-air-missile-defense/

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UPDATED with expert comment WASHINGTON: The Army needs “an additional $2-3 billion per year,” above its already generous 2019 budget, to fund its Big Six modernization priorities in the 2020s, says a new strategy document submitted to Congress. All told, the Army plans to spend over $13 billion on the Big Six over the five years from 2020 to 2024.

More than half of that money, $6.8 billion, goes to air and missile defense, ostensibly only the fifth of the six priorities. Not quite a quarter, $3 billion, goes to the No. 4 priority: Army command, control, and communications networks, including alternatives to GPS. By contrast, the top three priorities — long-range artillery and missiles, armored vehicles, and aircraft — get less than 20 percent combined, $2.6 billion.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #275 on: May 10, 2018, 06:52:42 am »
http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/articles/2018/5/8/army-push-for-greater-lethality-presents-opportunities-for-armaments-industry

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Indianapolis, Ind. — Lethality is now a "hot issue” in the Army and resources are being realigned to push these capabilities forward. And that's good news for industry, a service official said May 8.

“I don’t think I’ve ever seen such strong emphasis on lethality growth from small arms all the way up to artillery systems all at the same time. That’s almost unprecedented,” said Anthony Sebasto, executive director of the enterprise and systems engineering center at the Army’s Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center. “In the past they’ve all come in cycles but this is … a wholesale change,” he added.

The Army has identified long-range precision fires, next-generation combat vehicle, future vertical lift family of helicopters, air and missile defense, soldier lethality and the network as its primary areas of focus as it prepares for conflict with peer competitors such as China and Russia. Armaments touches on five of those six categories, Sebasto said at the National Defense Industrial Association’s Armament Systems Forum in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline marauder2048

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #276 on: May 15, 2018, 10:06:12 am »
Tail-Controlled GMLRS test at WSMR.


Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #277 on: May 19, 2018, 01:38:48 pm »
https://www.army.mil/article/205512

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WASHINGTON -- Within a decade, if not sooner, leap-ahead technologies like lasers, hypersonic weapons, mobile and secure networks and unmanned/autonomous air and ground vehicles will likely reside in combat formations, said the Army's secretary.

Peer threats from China and Russia -- nations also developing these technologies -- make fielding these systems absolutely necessary, said Secretary of the Army Mark T. Esper, who spoke Wednesday at the Center for a New American Security here.

The secretary provided a glimpse into some of these new capabilities that the Army is developing, in partnership with industry, as part of its six modernization priorities.

LONG-RANGE PRECISION FIRES

"The Army is looking at hypersonics as game changer in its No. 1 modernization priority: long-range precision fires," Esper said.

Hypersonic weapons can fire rounds or a projectile hundreds of miles, he said. "That gives us an incredible ability to reach out and hurt an adversary or at least to hold him at bay," he said. Further, it would buy time for maneuver forces to secure objectives on the battlefield.

Projectiles of hypersonic weapons travel at speeds of Mach 5 or more using a supersonic combustion ramjets. Mach 5 is a speed well above high-performance jets that cruise at Mach 3 or 4 at their fastest. Experts say that cruise missiles or even unmanned aerial systems could eventually be modified to make them hypersonic.

NEXT GENERATION COMBAT VEHICLE

The second modernization priority, a next generation combat vehicle, will replace the aging Bradley Fighting Vehicles, which no longer have the power or space to haul modern communications gear or advanced weaponry, he said.

For development of the NGCV, the Army is not averse to opening the competition up to foreign partners as well as American companies, he added. The Stryker, a highly successful vehicle, wasn't made in America.........................
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline jsport

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #278 on: May 20, 2018, 08:01:34 am »
"The Army is looking at hypersonics as game changer in its No. 1 modernization priority: long-range precision fires," Esper said.

Hypersonic weapons can fire rounds or a projectile hundreds of miles, he said. "That gives us an incredible ability to reach out and hurt an adversary or at least to hold him at bay," he said. Further, it would buy time for maneuver forces to secure objectives on the battlefield.

Projectiles of hypersonic weapons travel at speeds of Mach 5 or more using a supersonic combustion ramjets."

Artillery needs to eclipse Aviation as the premiere. This has been projected by DSB  since the early 2000s.

Modern & Future IADS are too dangerous. The ultimate low cost disposable armed swarm UAV is a guided artillery shell (for targets not in complex terrain) .
« Last Edit: May 20, 2018, 08:09:30 am by jsport »


Offline fredymac

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #280 on: May 22, 2018, 12:30:53 pm »

Offline fredymac

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #281 on: May 25, 2018, 06:06:11 am »
Northrop pitch for their command/control interface for forward air defense.


Offline sferrin

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Offline TomS

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