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Author Topic: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program  (Read 76876 times)

Offline marauder2048

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #390 on: November 30, 2018, 06:09:41 pm »
Those must be some tiny divert thrusters.

I think we've seen even more compact installations.

Offline sferrin

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #391 on: December 12, 2018, 03:54:55 pm »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline marauder2048

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #392 on: December 12, 2018, 04:19:02 pm »
Thanks. Looks great in flight.

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #393 on: December 12, 2018, 05:37:49 pm »
This is great but we could have had something in the 200-300 km range had we gone in for an upgraded propulsion like some of the solutions that were being talked about a few years ago.
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Offline sferrin

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #394 on: December 15, 2018, 09:15:16 am »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline marauder2048

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #395 on: December 16, 2018, 06:17:48 pm »
They had mentioned in the budget documents a future anti-radiation payload which makes that
surface-launched AARGM-ER  proposal a little more understandable.

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #396 on: December 16, 2018, 08:07:33 pm »
Better to put that payload on the PrSM and get proper stand-off capability unless they want to target a very low cost payload for a GMLRS which could also be interesting as long as they can increase the range. 
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline marauder2048

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #397 on: December 17, 2018, 01:40:16 am »
PrSM might very well have a much increased minimum range which GMLRS-ER has to cover. 

For VIPER, has anyone flown a Gluhareff Pressure Jet in the GMLRS-ER flight regime?

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #398 on: December 17, 2018, 03:31:25 pm »
I don't think so. However, we would have to look across many propulsion solutions to get to those performance levels. Perhaps an SFRJ based design is less risky.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #399 on: January 09, 2019, 03:07:32 pm »
Army picks Iron Dome for interim CMD, eyes long-term adoption of Israeli system


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The Army will acquire two Iron Dome batteries to provide ground forces an interim capability by 2020 against unmanned air vehicles, mortars, rockets, artillery and cruise missiles as well as explore full adoption of the Israeli-developed system for the Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2-Intercept program and incorporation with the Integrated Battle Command System by 2023.

Army acquisition executive Bruce Jette notified Congress of the previously unreported decision in a 14-page report dated Oct. 26, 2018, effectively swapping out an AIM-9X II guided missile -- being developed since 2014 for ground launch from the IFPC Inc. 2 Multi-Mission Launcher -- for the Iron Dome system, which includes the Tamir interceptor.

"Based on an analysis of cost, schedule and performance, the Army [has decided to]: field two interim IFPC batteries of Iron Dome in [fiscal year] 2020, while concurrently componentizing a launcher and interceptor solution that are interoperable and integrated with the Army IBCS by FY-23," states the report.

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The service considered three options: Iron Dome, Norwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System, built by Kongsburg and Raytheon, and an improved variant of the IFPC Inc. 2 program of record.

Only Iron Dome could meet the 2020 goal, according to the report, NASAMS lagging in 2021 and the IFPC Inc. 2 variant lagging until 2023. The NASAMS unit launcher carried a $12 million price tag and each AIM-120 missile was $800,000 and could intercept cruise missiles and unmanned aircraft but not rocket, artillery and mortar fire, according to the report.

The new variant of the IFPC Inc. 2 interceptor, the Expanded Mission Area Missile, is the focus of an ongoing competitive development between Lockheed's Miniature Hit-to-Kill Missile, Raytheon's Accelerated Improved Intercept Initiative and the SkyHunter missiles. "All EMAM candidate interceptors require qualification, integration, and test prior to production and fielding in FY-23."

By comparison, the Iron Dome launcher cost $1.37 million, the battle management center cost $4 million, the radar $34.7 million and each Tamir interceptor, $150,000.

Looking to 2023, the Army plans to explore the "feasibility of a componentized launcher and interceptor for an enduring IFPC solution that leverages joint studies and experimentation between the Army and the Marine Corps," the report states.

"The Army plans to experiment with Army sensors and IBCS to determine the complexity of integration of the componentized launcher and the interceptor solution prior to making a final decision on the enduring solution," states the report. "The Iron Dome system provides the best value to the Army based on its schedule, cost per kill, magazine depth, and capability against specified threats."



« Last Edit: January 09, 2019, 03:17:09 pm by bring_it_on »
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Offline dan_inbox

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #400 on: January 10, 2019, 03:32:24 am »
Given that Iron dome became operational in March 2011, and proved its value intercepting enemy missiles two weeks later (in Beersheba), it is interesting that the Army had to go through all this rigmarole and all this time to make a decision.
No comments on the fact that they target to start protecting American lives only in 2020.
At best. Before any delays, snafus, lobbying and whatnot.

Oh well...

Offline sferrin

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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #402 on: January 10, 2019, 07:51:51 am »
So is Miniature Hit-To-Kill out?

https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/products/miniature-hit-to-kill.html

 ???

It doesn't appear to be out but it is tough to see how the Army spends the money now that it is acquiring the Tamir. The temptation would always be there to just axe the funding and keep buying more Tamir rounds. That may not be all of that of a bad thing as long as the Army keeps investment into the HEL-TVD and decides to move it into EM&D phase soon after the demonstrations. If we can field 100-150 kW HEL on a FMTV by 2030 that would go a long way in support of the Counter RAM mission.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #403 on: January 10, 2019, 02:48:20 pm »
Army eyes laser weapon for short-range air and missile defense by 2027


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The Army has set plans to integrate a high-energy laser weapon into its short-range air and missile defense arsenal by 2027, making room for a directed-energy capability alongside guided-missile interceptors in the Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 system.

This objective is revealed in an Oct. 26, 2018 Army report to Congress on IFPC Inc. 2, the mobile, ground-based air and missile defense system designed to provide protection in all directions against cruise missiles, unmanned aircraft, rockets, artillery and mortar threats that would replace the venerable Avenger system.

The report details how the Army explored three different options -- or, as the document notes, "courses of action" -- with varying capabilities to meet an objective of fielding an interim cruise missile defense capability by 2020.

"Integration of directed energy, by FY-27, is common to all three COAs," states the report.

That single sentence provides new insight into Army plans to weaponize laser technology.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2019, 02:49:58 pm by bring_it_on »
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown