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Author Topic: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names  (Read 25753 times)

Offline Jemiba

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2012, 06:46:35 am »
German is a pluricentric language, so there actually isn't a common pronounciation. Generally there's a kind of countrywide
accepted "correct pronounciation", but looking into history, this changed several times, often depending on the most
influential parts of the country. Today the variant which is spoken in or around Hannover is often regarded as the "purest" form.
I'm from Berlin and at school we were told, that our accent actually not even is an accent, but just a kind of "bad pronounciation" !  ::)
We often pronounce the final "g" as Stéphane told us (" ..sh" instead of "k"") ...
Had a look into the list in http://www-oedt.kfunigraz.ac.at/oedtradio/content/05-mat/3plzglobal.htm for other pluricentric languages:
Arab, Chinese, Portugese, Korean and lots of others and, well, amongst them, besides German, English, French and Russian !
It takes a long time, before all mistakes are made ...

Online pometablava

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2012, 07:16:46 am »
The same for Spanish. Specially different in the South from the ideal/academic Castellano.


Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2012, 08:18:38 am »
As pometablava points out, there is an "ideal" academic Spanish in Castilla.

In the same way, there is an "ideal" academic English in Oxford (though few people actually speak it).

Likewise, there is an "ideal", academic French, and it is supposed to be the one from the Tours area.

What German, what Russian, what Polish, etc. areas are considered to have the "ideal" pronunciation?

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2015, 03:41:22 pm »
Just a friendly reminder to all forum members wishing to decipher titles and captions written in the Russian language (please note that sounds are almost never exact equivalents but the closest possible in the English language):

Offline foiling

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2015, 02:42:33 am »
Thank you all for your contributions & clarifications. As a keen enthusiast of Russian aircraft, who cannot speak a word of Russian, but can now identify certain key words useful in interpreting data, this has been extremely helpful, and much appreciated.

Offline Boogey

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2018, 06:01:38 am »
For those not familiar with Eastern European languages, deciphering surnames and transcribing them can be a real pain...

Ж (Russian, etc.) = Ž (Czech, etc.) = Ź (Polish) = ZH (English) = J (French)

It's nuance of course, but Russian letter Ж we in Poland write with letter Ż, not Ź, and the pronounciation of it sounds a little bit like French j
in words " jalousie " or " je t’aime ". The phone Ź sounds quite differently.


That's why lots of people pronounce Škoda as "Skoda" (instead of Shkoda) ...

Polish people know it very well, but we have to pronounce the name " Škoda " as " Skoda ", because the properly pronounced word " Szkoda "
means in Polish " harm ", " damage ", " detriment ", " injury ", " hurt " and so on, so the associations are not good.

Besides Polish people when learnig Russian language are teached to pronounce the phone Л like Polish Ł, that's why every Polish
would instinctively write the name of Лавочкин as Whahvochkin in English.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 06:15:28 am by Boogey »
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Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Pronouncing and spelling Eastern European names
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2018, 08:22:15 am »
For those not familiar with Eastern European languages, deciphering surnames and transcribing them can be a real pain...

Ж (Russian, etc.) = Ž (Czech, etc.) = Ź (Polish) = ZH (English) = J (French)

It's nuance of course, but Russian letter Ж we in Poland write with letter Ż, not Ź, and the pronounciation of it sounds a little bit like French j
in words " jalousie " or " je t’aime ". The phone Ź sounds quite differently.


That's why lots of people pronounce Škoda as "Skoda" (instead of Shkoda) ...

Polish people know it very well, but we have to pronounce the name " Škoda " as " Skoda ", because the properly pronounced word " Szkoda "
means in Polish " harm ", " damage ", " detriment ", " injury ", " hurt " and so on, so the associations are not good.

Besides Polish people when learnig Russian language are teached to pronounce the phone Л like Polish Ł, that's why every Polish
would instinctively write the name of Лавочкин as Whahvochkin in English.

Very interesting stuff, Boogey. Nice to see you around, and thanks for this valuable info (I had always wondered how the heck Ł ought to be pronounced, now I know!  ;D)