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Kawasaki P-X and C-X

Trident

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Triton said:
Skeletal view of Kawasaki XC-2.

Skeletal view of Kawasaki XP-1
Thanks for sharing those! Much better than the previous low-res versions and both now allow some interesting details to be observed.

First of all, the XC-2 cut-away confirms what I said earlier about the landing gear suspension. Secondly the XP-1 appears to have 3 fixed AESA-radars to ensure adequate coverage for surface search - one in the nose radome and 2 cheek arrays below the cockpit windows on either side and a retractable FLIR/EO turret ahead of the nose gear well. You can even see the outlines of the dielectric panel covering the radar arrays as well as the doors covering the FLIR ball in photos of the prototypes!

For example

http://img.blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ybi/1/97/7f/adtwmanbo/folder/433160/img_433160_5420445_3?1192755147

http://img.blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ybi/1/97/7f/adtwmanbo/folder/433160/img_433160_5420445_2?1192755147
 

Trident

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More pics:

http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ktbmwm3/35897958.html

The first one is pretty intriguing - could this be an Enhanced Vision System FLIR, much like those found on many high-end business jets? Might just be some generic antenna fairing, but certainly interesting.
 

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Another observation on the XP-1 cut-away: unlike the older versions posted here previously, the new image shows the underwing weapons pylon locations (4 each for a total of 8).
 

Sundog

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Trident said:
More pics:

http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ktbmwm3/35897958.html

The first one is pretty intriguing - could this be an Enhanced Vision System FLIR, much like those found on many high-end business jets? Might just be some generic antenna fairing, but certainly interesting.
The item you're pointing to on the nose appears to be the same as the one on the side of the fuselage and, hence, probably on the other side of the fuselage as well.
 

Trident

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Those are MAWS sensors of which there are two fore and aft each, so I guess it's possible. A fifth one seems redundant though as most large aircraft make do with 4 apertures for 360° toroidal coverage.

EDIT: Specifically, they are a dead ringer for the EADS AAR-60 MILDS.
 

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Hmmm ... long time no update, but can anyone summarise what's the current status for the P-1 and C-2 for both flight testings !??

Thanks, Deino
 

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Thanks blackkite for treating us to all these beautiful photos of two great-looking aircraft!
 

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http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0000324155

The Defense Ministry said Thursday it will postpone the deployment of two state-of-the-art P1 patrol planes to the Maritime Self-Defense Force’s Atsugi Air Base in Kanagawa Prefecture, scheduled for late this month, after engine trouble occurred during a test flight.

Designed to replace aging P3C patrol planes, the P1 is manufactured domestically by such companies as Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd.

The ministry had planned to deploy seven P1 planes by the end of March following flight tests. The total deployment of P1s was expected to be around 70.

The ministry said the two P1 planes deployed at the base since March will be grounded until the cause of the trouble is determined.

According to the ministry, the engine trouble occurred during a test flight conducted by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in May.

Several engines experienced unstable combustion and stopped after the plane plunged about 2,000 meters from an altitude of about 10,000 meters during the testing of alarm equipment.

No issues were reported as far as prototypes were concerned. Sources said the recent problems are believed to have been caused by minor modifications to the engines, which occurred in the manufacturing stage of the production model.

The MSDF notified local governments around the Atsugi base of the flight suspension.

Efforts to make improvements are now under way at Kawasaki Heavy Industries and elsewhere, but a senior ministry official said that if it was the engine that malfunctioned, the situation is serious....
 

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Trident

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blackkite said:
Hi! Kawasaki YCX.
Thanks! In that second slide you attached as an image, detailing the cargo hold dimensions, what does the diagram on the upper right show? Payload height vs. payload weight envelopes? If so, that's an interesting graphic that illustrates quite well why the XC-2, A400M and An-70 independently converged on almost identical hold cross sections.
 

blackkite

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Hi!
ペイロード : payload(ton), 最小天井高 : cargo room ceiling minimum height(m)
 

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http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0000685748

....The ministry announced Sept. 27 that the cause of patrol aircraft’s trouble was a problem in the fuel engine injection valves. The MSDF suspended flights of the P-1 planes following the incident.

Based on the findings, the ministry will repair five P-1 planes deployed at its bases, including Atsugi Air Base in Kanagawa Prefecture, then provide an explanation to local governments concerned.

Once these actions are taken, flights of the P-1 planes could resume this month. The ministry said the engine problem is unlikely to adversely affect alert and surveillance activities.

According to the ministry, the incident occurred on May 13 over the Pacific Ocean during a test flight. At the time, the aircraft was trying to execute a nosedive from an altitude of about 10,000 meters to confirm the stability of warning systems. However, fuel combustion in the engines became unstable and all four briefly stopped working.

The MSDF and IHI Corp., which manufactured the engines, checked the plane and found that an irregularity in the fuel injection valves prevented a sufficient supply of fuel.

Following the incident, the makers improved programs responsible for controlling the valves to increase the flow of fuel....
....The trouble occurred because the shape of the engines was partially altered for mass production.

While the move was aimed at simplifying maintenance work, the incident naturally brought criticism to the ministry over the apparent insufficient data it had collected on how the engine performed.

It was fortunate that the cause of the problem was identified about four months after the incident and that adverse affects on the MSDF’s warning and surveillance activities and the ministry’s plan to deploy the P-1 planes were avoided....
 

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Grey Havoc

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There's going to be a AEW derivative of the P-1 for the JASDF, apparently:

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001585020

8:34 pm, September 21, 2014




The Yomiuri Shimbun



The Defense Ministry is set to start research aimed at domestically manufacturing early-warning aircraft for the first time, with the aim of increasing surveillance on possible incursions into the nation’s territorial airspace, according to ministry sources.

The move is part of an effort to boost the ministry’s preparedness to deal with the increasingly severe security environment in areas surrounding this nation, largely due to China’s increasing military spending in recent years.

The ministry will seek to build the country’s first domestically produced early-warning plane by the mid-2020s, hoping to see it replace the aging U.S.-made aircraft model currently used by the Air Self-Defense Force for similar purposes, the sources said.

Airborne early-warning (AEW) aircraft are outfitted with radar equipment on top of the fuselage, allowing them to monitor distant and low-elevation areas outside the range of stationary ground radar.

When aircraft that could invade Japanese airspace are spotted, fighters from the Air Self-Defense Force are scrambled.

The ASDF currently has 13 U.S.-made E-2C early-warning planes, which perform observation and surveillance together with E-767 airborne warning and control system (AWACS) aircraft that also have command capabilities.

The E-2C planes have been in use for some time. Finding a successor aircraft is urgently required.

In addition to the U.S.-made successor to the E-2C, the ministry hopes to introduce a domestically made AEW aircraft and plans to request ¥80 million in the budget for next fiscal year to study the matter, the sources said.

The ministry is planning to cooperate with private-sector companies to make a prototype aircraft next fiscal year, the sources said.

The ministry plans to base the fuselage on the P-1, a state-of-the-art antisubmarine patrol aircraft it developed, the sources said. This would be outfitted with radar that employs domestic technology such as that used in stationary ground radar.

But ¥252.8 billion has already been spent over 12 years to develop the P-1, so additional domestic development could present problems in terms of cost.

With Chinese and Russian armed forces expanding their activities, ASDF fighters were scrambled more than 800 times last fiscal year for the first time since the Cold War ended in 1989.

In November last year, China unilaterally declared an air defense identification zone over the East China Sea.

Then in May and June, Chinese fighters flew unusually close to SDF aircraft several times over the East China Sea, and a Chinese fighter drew close to a U.S. military plane over the South China Sea in August.

The ministry sees incidents such as these as having increased the importance of AEW aircraft.

One of the government’s goals in creating a made-in-Japan early-warning aircraft is to develop domestically as much the cutting-edge technology necessary as possible for national defense.

Realizing a domestic AEW aircraft, with the advanced radar technology such planes require, would allow the Self-Defense Forces to make necessary improvements and modifications more flexibly without having to go overseas for them.
 

Richard N

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Has anyone found 3 view drawings of the P-1 useable for modeling?

FoxOne Models prototyped a 1/72 model but I have not been able to find any information about its production. Full article with many pictures here: http://foxone2.blog53.fc2.com/category97-3.html
 

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Stargazer2006

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P-1: This beauty definitely looks like the offspring of Lockheed's S-3A and P-3A...
 

Triton

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"Ministry eyes Japan-made AEW aircraft"
8:34 pm, September 21, 2014

Source:
http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001585020

"The Defense Ministry is set to start research aimed at domestically manufacturing early-warning aircraft for the first time, with the aim of increasing surveillance on possible incursions into the nation’s territorial airspace, according to ministry sources.

The move is part of an effort to boost the ministry’s preparedness to deal with the increasingly severe security environment in areas surrounding this nation, largely due to China’s increasing military spending in recent years.

The ministry will seek to build the country’s first domestically produced early-warning plane by the mid-2020s, hoping to see it replace the aging U.S.-made aircraft model currently used by the Air Self-Defense Force for similar purposes, the sources said.

Airborne early-warning (AEW) aircraft are outfitted with radar equipment on top of the fuselage, allowing them to monitor distant and low-elevation areas outside the range of stationary ground radar.

When aircraft that could invade Japanese airspace are spotted, fighters from the Air Self-Defense Force are scrambled.

The ASDF currently has 13 U.S.-made E-2C early-warning planes, which perform observation and surveillance together with E-767 airborne warning and control system (AWACS) aircraft that also have command capabilities.

The E-2C planes have been in use for some time. Finding a successor aircraft is urgently required.

In addition to the U.S.-made successor to the E-2C, the ministry hopes to introduce a domestically made AEW aircraft and plans to request ¥80 million in the budget for next fiscal year to study the matter, the sources said.

The ministry is planning to cooperate with private-sector companies to make a prototype aircraft next fiscal year, the sources said.

The ministry plans to base the fuselage on the P-1, a state-of-the-art antisubmarine patrol aircraft it developed, the sources said. This would be outfitted with radar that employs domestic technology such as that used in stationary ground radar.

But ¥252.8 billion has already been spent over 12 years to develop the P-1, so additional domestic development could present problems in terms of cost.

With Chinese and Russian armed forces expanding their activities, ASDF fighters were scrambled more than 800 times last fiscal year for the first time since the Cold War ended in 1989.

In November last year, China unilaterally declared an air defense identification zone over the East China Sea.

Then in May and June, Chinese fighters flew unusually close to SDF aircraft several times over the East China Sea, and a Chinese fighter drew close to a U.S. military plane over the South China Sea in August.

The ministry sees incidents such as these as having increased the importance of AEW aircraft.

One of the government’s goals in creating a made-in-Japan early-warning aircraft is to develop domestically as much the cutting-edge technology necessary as possible for national defense.

Realizing a domestic AEW aircraft, with the advanced radar technology such planes require, would allow the Self-Defense Forces to make necessary improvements and modifications more flexibly without having to go overseas for them.



he Defense Ministry is set to start research aimed at domestically manufacturing early-warning aircraft for the first time, with the aim of increasing surveillance on possible incursions into the nation’s territorial airspace, according to ministry sources.

The move is part of an effort to boost the ministry’s preparedness to deal with the increasingly severe security environment in areas surrounding this nation, largely due to China’s increasing military spending in recent years.

The ministry will seek to build the country’s first domestically produced early-warning plane by the mid-2020s, hoping to see it replace the aging U.S.-made aircraft model currently used by the Air Self-Defense Force for similar purposes, the sources said.

Airborne early-warning (AEW) aircraft are outfitted with radar equipment on top of the fuselage, allowing them to monitor distant and low-elevation areas outside the range of stationary ground radar.

When aircraft that could invade Japanese airspace are spotted, fighters from the Air Self-Defense Force are scrambled.

The ASDF currently has 13 U.S.-made E-2C early-warning planes, which perform observation and surveillance together with E-767 airborne warning and control system (AWACS) aircraft that also have command capabilities.

The E-2C planes have been in use for some time. Finding a successor aircraft is urgently required.

In addition to the U.S.-made successor to the E-2C, the ministry hopes to introduce a domestically made AEW aircraft and plans to request ¥80 million in the budget for next fiscal year to study the matter, the sources said.

The ministry is planning to cooperate with private-sector companies to make a prototype aircraft next fiscal year, the sources said.

The ministry plans to base the fuselage on the P-1, a state-of-the-art antisubmarine patrol aircraft it developed, the sources said. This would be outfitted with radar that employs domestic technology such as that used in stationary ground radar.

But ¥252.8 billion has already been spent over 12 years to develop the P-1, so additional domestic development could present problems in terms of cost.

With Chinese and Russian armed forces expanding their activities, ASDF fighters were scrambled more than 800 times last fiscal year for the first time since the Cold War ended in 1989.

In November last year, China unilaterally declared an air defense identification zone over the East China Sea.

Then in May and June, Chinese fighters flew unusually close to SDF aircraft several times over the East China Sea, and a Chinese fighter drew close to a U.S. military plane over the South China Sea in August.

The ministry sees incidents such as these as having increased the importance of AEW aircraft.

One of the government’s goals in creating a made-in-Japan early-warning aircraft is to develop domestically as much the cutting-edge technology necessary as possible for national defense.

Realizing a domestic AEW aircraft, with the advanced radar technology such planes require, would allow the Self-Defense Forces to make necessary improvements and modifications more flexibly without having to go overseas for them.
 

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T-50

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very good stuff too see!! Japan is going more and more developing and building its own aircraft!
not anymore depending on the US aircraft industry,but like a phoenix out of its ashes building up a great aviation industry of its own!
 

TomS

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I'm surprised to see a rotodome -- I thought that AESA made flat fixed arrays like Wedgetail and Erieye a better bet.
 

Deino

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blackkite said:
Not sure, but it looks a bit psed !?? ... at least if it came from I China I would call it a fake.

Deino ???
 

blackkite

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The budgetary request in the Heisei 27 fiscal year(2015)

http://www.mod.go.jp/j/approach/others/equipment/sougousyutoku/pdf/siryou/23_01.pdf
Please watch page.16
Obviously radar dome drawing is added to the wind tunnel test model photograph.
The form of this airplane may change with future surveillance study.

Surveillance study about giving an early warning function is carried out to a domestic large-sized machine.
(A budget is about 80 million yen.)
The body and the aerodynamic data to the airplane of a form which carries a warning-and-surveilance radar for the purpose of using for development of a future early warning airplane are investigated.

Off topic
Future fighter associated business (about 41,200 million yen)
- About fighter plane, also including the possibility of international joint development, empirical study for at home attaining accumulation and an advancement of a fighter plane pertinent art will be carried out in the future so that development can be taken into consideration as a choice by the retirement-from-service time of fighter plane (F-2).
- Research enterprise 12 affairs (new seven affairs, five continuation)
<The main research enterprises>
1. Fuselage : Non Fastener weight saving
2. Engine : High Thrust and light weight small size prototype engine Trial Production
3. Avionics : Research of Stealth-shaped radar dome
4. Elementary technology research
5.In order to clear the demand performance of future fighter plane and technical achievement possibility, trade-off study and a simulation are carried out.
 

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red admiral

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TomS said:
I'm surprised to see a rotodome -- I thought that AESA made flat fixed arrays like Wedgetail and Erieye a better bet.
Multiple AESA within a non-rotating rotodome (so that would be just a 'dome') will give 360 deg coverage. This is not possible with the Wedgetail/Erieye configuration.
 

TomS

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Thanks. I thought of that after I posted. I'm racking my brain to remember where I've seen a design with three fixed antennas inside a non-rotating circular dome. Maybe an E-2 replacement?
 

AeroFranz

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Maybe this?


http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4313.msg199887.html#msg199887


in this case the rotodome was actually triangular (after all you don't need a fully circular fairing if there is no rotating antenna)
 

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I think one of the Chinese AEW types (KJ-2000?) has such an antenna, but can't check at the moment.

Deino will know.

Chris
 

red admiral

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TomS said:
Thanks. I thought of that after I posted. I'm racking my brain to remember where I've seen a design with three fixed antennas inside a non-rotating circular dome. Maybe an E-2 replacement?
The competitors to Wegetail offered to Australia featured this configuration.
 

Deino

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CJGibson said:
I think one of the Chinese AEW types (KJ-2000?) has such an antenna, but can't check at the moment.

Deino will know.

Chris

You are correct, the Chinese KJ-2000 uses such an antenna consisting of three arrays arranged to scan 120* each.


By the way I still think that this P-1 wind- tunnel model is photoshoped. :mad:
 

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Deino said:
By the way I still think that this P-1 wind- tunnel model is photoshoped. :mad:
I think blackkite confirmed that it was an 'official' photoshop, used in a MOD budget request document to illustrate the concept. The old 'pennywise, pound foolish' approach in action.
 

TomS

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red admiral said:
TomS said:
Thanks. I thought of that after I posted. I'm racking my brain to remember where I've seen a design with three fixed antennas inside a non-rotating circular dome. Maybe an E-2 replacement?
The competitors to Wegetail offered to Australia featured this configuration.

Ah, that's the one I was thinking of -- A310 with three Phalcon AESA antennas in a fixed dome.


http://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/e-310.htm
 
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